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Moscow Stations Paperback – January 1, 1998

2.7 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews

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Paperback, January 1, 1998
$126.81 $8.95

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Language Notes

Text: English (translation)
Original Language: Russian --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Venedikt Erofeev was born in 1938 and died in 1990 of throat cancer in a tragic parody of his autobiographical hero's fate. His fame rests essentially on the novel Moskva - Petushki, written in the 1970s and published in sixteen languages. Stephen Mulrine is a Glasgow-born poet and playwright. His many translations from Russian range from the classic plays of Pushkin, Gogol, Ostrovsky, Turgenev and Chekhov, to contemporary works by Alexander Gelman and Lyudmila Petrushevskaya.
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 54 pages
  • Publisher: Oberon Books (January 1, 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1870259475
  • ISBN-13: 978-1870259477
  • Product Dimensions: 7.3 x 4.8 x 0.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 2.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #7,150,333 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Moscow Stations is on of the most fascinating literary works of late Soviet literature. Sub-titled 'a poem', this novella is indeed poetic and dense, mixing autobiography, fantasy and hallucination in the tragic life of the narrator, a homeless and occasionally-employed alchoholic, who wanders the Moscow streets and subway system forever in search of the next drink, and haunted by the dream of a beautiful woman he has apparently promised to meet at one particular station which he never seems to be able to find.
Woven around this hopeless quest, this slim volume contains so much: from alchohol-addled discussions of philiosophy on half-empty subway carriages rattling on throught the impenetrable Moscow darness, to pin-sharp satire at the absurdity of totalitarian bureaucracy; from passages of the most heart-rending tenderness, particularly in the description of a brief visit to the narrator's sick son, to the most laugh-out-loud humour.
The writing gathers momentum and increases in insane intensity as the inevitable tragic demise of the narrator approaches, stabbed in the neck by unknown assailants in an echo of the pointless death of Josef K in Kafka's 'The Trial', and in a bizarre prefiguration of Erofeev's own death of throat cancer. The author's life was as ribald, riotous and ultimately tragic as his character in this book - the stories of cocktails made from vodka, meths and pesticides; the loss of family, the lazy drunken work-crew antics - these are all apparently drawn from his own mazey, mashed-up existance.
The only slightly disappointing thing about the English edition of Moscow Stations is some slightly stilted and over-literal translation in the early chapters.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Naaaaaaah! Not a good read. Ridiculous, tedious account of the drunks in Russia.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This thing is more like a pamphlet than a book

Reviewed by James David
Author of The Coast Guard Oracle
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