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Movie

3.7 out of 5 stars 11 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Unknown Binding
  • Publisher: Mysterious Press; Advance copy edition (1995)
  • ASIN: B000VANS9O
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Michelle Mumaw Gage on March 2, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
You had to know if Stanley wrote a movie, someone would turn up murdered on the set, didn't you? I greatly enjoyed this book, not the least because it reminded me of Parnell Hall's discussion of his own experience with writing a film, which was very similar to what Stanley dealt with only without the dead bodies. It was nice to see Sergeant Clark again; he might not be Stanley's favorite police officer but I like him, and I like reading about his interactions with both Stanley and Sergeant MacAulluiff.
This novel was a Shamus Award nominee for Best Private Eye Novel, and a Lefty Award nominee for Funniest Mystery Novel.
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Another good story. Not as much humor as some of the others. But it has it's moments. I really liked McAuliff's role in this move. He was not there to help Stanley solve the crime. His boss even has a bigger part in this book.
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I have read all the Stanley Hastings mysteries. I wish Parnell Hall would write more novels about the hapless failed actor who has become a third-rate private detective, but, somehow, always wins in the end.
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Format: Kindle Edition
Detective Stanley Hastings finally has his chance to hit The Big Time as a screenwriter. Sidney Garfellow, a documentary director people have actually heard of, has hired him to write the screenplay for his first 'regular' movie. Stanley dreams of leaving his less-than-rewarding career as an investigator for a personal injury lawyer for the Silver Screen. What stands in the way of this? Well, Sidney Garfellow, who keeps changing his mind about what he wants, forcing Stanley to rewrite and rewrite again. Then there's the film's star, who ignores Stanley's golden prose in favor of more 'natural' lines he's written himself. Oh, and there's people getting killed on the set. Just a little problem there...

Hall draws heavily on his own experiences when writing Stanley Hastings: he has worked on the stage, in films, and, at one time, as a detective himself. He writes hilarious songs, often about the foibles of being an author. It is no surprise that he has some experience with screenwriting himself: he wrote the screenplay for C.H.U.D. At least Stanley gets to write a movie with "four hot babes" in it.

I've read several of the Hastings novels, and I always enjoy the verbal humor in them. This novel is no exception. Stanley gives us his unvarnished and aggrieved opinions of the director, the actor, and Murty the sound man. He exchanges marvelous barbs with his boss, who visits the set, and Sergeant McAuliff, a series regular who is hired as a consultant. After the deaths begin, Detective Clark is brought in to investigate. Stanley doesn't like Clark: in a previous novel, Stanley was his prime suspect. The cops are smart, especially Clark, who is far from the closed-minded nabob mystery authors so often employ.
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I enjoyed this book but not as much as his other stories. It got a little bogged down in detail but still kept my attention and interest
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These books by this author are very interesting and they keep you wanting to read more. He wrote a very good string of books.
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