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Mozart's Sister (English Subtitled)

2012

NR CC

(English Subtitles) Written, directed and produced by René Féret, MOZART'S SISTER is a re-imagined account of the early life of Maria Anna "Nannerl" Mozart (played by Marie Féret, the director's daughter), five years older than Wolfgang (David Moreau) and a musical prodigy in her own right.

Starring:
Marie Féret, Marc Barbé
Runtime:
2 hours, 0 minutes

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Product Details

Genres Drama, Romance, International, Music
Director René Féret
Starring Marie Féret, Marc Barbé
Supporting actors Delphine Chuillot, David Moreau, Clovis Fouin, Lisa Féret, Valentine Duval, Adèle Leprêtre, Mona Heftre, Salomé Stévenin, Julien Féret, Nicolas Giraud, Océane Jubert, Arthur Tos, René Féret, Benjamin Couture, Grégoire Girard, Jorge Tomé, Frédéric Hulne, Samuel Cahu
Studio Music Box Films
MPAA rating NR (Not Rated)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly Details
Format Amazon Video (streaming online video)

Other Formats

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Blu-ray
This is a quote from the film in which Maria Anna Mozart - the sister of the child prodigy Wolfgang - laments that her father has opened her personal diaries and scribbled comments about the genius of his young son but her own achievements, hard work, and devotion to music are ignored.

The movie transported me...to the eighteenth century in a way that "Amadeus" did not. Whereas "Amadeus" is spectacle, this gentle film takes place in the drawing rooms or homes of the nobility. It is the time when Mozart's father, Leopold, is dragging his two amazing children throughout Europe to show them off, to improve his son's musical education, and to advance his own thwarted ambitions. Needless to say, the photography, the costumes, and the music are a delight. I adored the film, yet was saddened by its theme. Bottom line, this is the most underrated film of 2011.

Marie Feret - who plays the 16 year old sister of Wolfgang - is a wonder. How does she do it? Understatement. She conveys emotions all through her eyes - shyness, laughter, intelligence, joy, anxiety, and alas...disappointment. [The director actually used both of his young daughters as actresses in "his film" - and gets terrific performances from them]

As for the principal character in the movie, the truth is that Mozart's sister was brilliant and talented but, as a woman, she was forced to take second place to her brother. This is not to say she was the better genius. That is impossible. But her opportunities - as a violinist or as a composer - were walled in by her domineering father. That she might have been an extraordinary genius - at least as a musician - is a serious possibility.
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Format: Amazon Video
This film took me completely by surprise. As a period piece, it satisfies to the greatest possible detail in visual and cultural accuracy, pulling us right into the lives and times so vividly that we can breathe it... or struggle to breathe as we so keenly feel the struggles. But to label this simply as a period piece would be a great injustice.

Superbly written and directed, this deep and lavish story of the lives within a family and the society it moved in, and especially that of a young woman so blessed with talent and yet thrust into such stifling conformity that manages to destroy the minds of some and the lives of others.

Every role -- every single role -- was impeccably performed by these amazing actors. But shining above them all was Marie Féret whose intensity of withheld emotions felt all the more powerful by her subtlety and restraint. I want to see her again and again.

I can't remember another film that gripped me so completely that I sat riveted to the screen until the final credits had disappeared, wishing I could pull it back for more.
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Format: DVD
If it's the magic name Mozart that attracts you to this film, you will be mildly disappointed. The 11-year-old poppet who plays Wolfi is hardly more than a well-costumed prop, and there are scant snatches of any music in the film. [I suppose one should be thankful that there isn't a pseudo-classical soundtrack slurping sweetly in the background.] Yes, it's really about Nannerl, Mozart's older sister, and it has a 'message' to expound, about the frustration of a young woman's genius in a paternalistic society.

With Nannerl as protagonist, Leopold Mozart, the composer's notoriously domineering and ambitious father, is the chief antagonist in the script of this film; essentially, Father Leopold precludes his daughter's aspirations to compose for two reasons, first that it's not imaginable to him that a Woman could indeed compose worthily, and second that he aspires to see his daughter married well, above his own rank in society. That's historically accurate; Leopold Mozart did prohibit his daughter even from performing publicly at age 18, and refused to let her accompany him and Wolfgang to Italy. Nannerl (Maria Anna Mozart (1761-1829) stayed with her parents in Salzburg until her arranged marriage in 1783 to a wealthy widower with five children already. Nannerl returned to Salzburg, with four of her step-children and two of her own children, after her husband's death in 1801. Her parents and her famous brother were already dead by then, and Nannerl lived quietly. Wolfgang's widow Constanze and her nephew Franz Xavier had no contact with her until the 1820s, when she had become feeble and blind. There's lingering myth that she died in poverty, but in fact she left quite a substantial estate of money.
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Format: Blu-ray
This is a quote from the film in which Maria Anna Mozart- the sister of the child prodigy Wolfgang - laments that her father has opened her personal diaries and scribbled comments about the genius of his young son; her own achievements, hard work, and devotion to music are ignored.

The movie transported me...to the eighteenth century in a way that "Amadeus" did not. Whereas "Amadeus" is spectacle, this gentle film takes place in the drawing rooms or homes of the nobility. It is the time when Mozart's father, Leopold, is dragging his two amazing children throughout Europe to show them off, to improve his son's musical education, and to advance his own thwarted ambitions. Needless to say, the photography, the costumes, and the music are a delight. I adored the film, yet was saddened by its theme.

Marie Feret - who plays the 14 year old sister of Wolfgang - is a wonder. How does she do it? Understatement. She conveys emotion all through her eyes - shyness, laughter, intelligence, joy, anxiety, and, alas...disappointment. The truth is that Mozart's sister was brilliant and talented but, as a woman, she was forced to take second place to her brother. This is not to say that she was the better genius. That is impossible. But her opportunities - as a violinist or as a composer - were walled in by her domineering father.

Important scenes are the interaction of Mozart's sister with one of the princesses of France. The princess is locked away in a convent and befriends the talented young girl. The princess learns to accept her role as a bride of Christ and to find joy and contentment as an obedient nun. But Nannerl, the sister of Mozart, is different from other girls. Her heart and mind beg her to create; her society and father simply won't allow it.
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