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Mrs. Tuesday's Departure Paperback – April 4, 2012

4.1 out of 5 stars 585 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews


" ...the reader is caught up and swept along in its flow, from the beautiful cover right down to its rather stunning end." -- Karl Larew author of CANDLES IN THE WINDOW

"It has been a long time since I felt I was a part of a story rather than being just a casual observer. I truly cared for the characters, their lives and the turmoil that played itself out around them. I am looking forward to more excellent writing from Ms. Anderson!" - Atkinson77 

"A beautifully crafted tale of a time when people's humanity was in question. The indomitable human spirit will always survive. Great job!" - Nancy E. Miller

"I really enjoyed this book. Family loyalty is important-then and now. Natalie has me wanting to start writing again, maybe I will even write the book I dreamed about when I was young." - Sherryl Richey

From the Author

I first published Mrs. Tuesday's Departure as an ebook on Amazon's Kindle a little over a year ago. It went well. But as the year went on, I felt that the book was not as good as it could have been. Which inspired me to take advantage of an ebook's fluidity, to make some changes and plan it re-launch. Mrs. Tuesday's Departure, in its original form, was quite a bit different from the book I published in some important ways: First it was written in the First Person Point of View, which gave it a much more intimate feel, which as it turns out, was the right POV for a story about a family experiencing the most terrifying moments of war. Second, it was actually set in Budapest, Hungary during World War Two, not in the fictional other-world it was thinly disguised as. And finally, it had a spiritual element that explored a particular element of religious faith that has always perplexed me....the challenge of believing in something we cannot see. With that in mind, a few months ago, I resurrected the original manuscript and set to work dusting it off and making a few changes, hopefully clearing up things that in reviews of the first Mrs. Tuesday release had caused consternation for some readers.

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 254 pages
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (April 4, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1468170546
  • ISBN-13: 978-1468170542
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.6 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (585 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,792,638 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By K. Freeman on February 29, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I'm sorry, but I just could not finish this story. That's very rare for me.

First, the book really, really needed a thorough copyedit. There are typos, grammatical errors, problems with sentence structure, and word choice issues throughout. The grammar and sentence structure problems in particular are so big that they affect a reader's understanding of the story.

The main "chapter" requirement seems to have been word count. The chapters are no more than two pages long each, and they seem to break for no apparent reason. Perhaps the author tried to pad the length by adding white space?

The story jumps around from one scene to the next with no continuity, fluidity, or connection. Characters come and go aimlessly, sometimes named and sometimes not. I think some pages may have been placed out of order--that's how bad the scene flow, or lack thereof, is.

It's clear as I read the other reviews that they are talking about a totally different book. It sounds like the first version was better than this revision. Unfortunately, I cannot recommend this book to anyone in its current form.
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After reading all the great reviews of this book I was looking forward to reading it. Unfortunately I didn't make it past the first twenty pages or so. It is so poorly written and the editing so horrendous I found it unreadable. The story was intriguing but due to lack of (or sometimes excessive) punctuation I was reading sentences over and over trying to determine the context. In the end it just wasn't worth it.
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Mrs. Tuesday's departure is a good easy read on a drizzly Saturday afternoon. The writing style is easy to follow and simply written, making for a quick read. I was disappointed that the story was so short, as I would've liked to have delved a little deeper into some of the issues that I feel were at the heart of this story. I like the notion of "the wanted" as it brings reminiscence of the Nazi war which this seems to echo in many ways, and that was one of the strengths of the story: that it has a deeper resonance then the seeming everyday characters pervading the story would initially show. It's not, however, a story of Nazis. It is a character driven story. One that is appealing in its universality.

I do feel as though the characters at times -- especially at the beginning -- needed more flesh, as I had a hard time discerning between all of the female characters names at first. There wasn't enough physical description of the separate characters for me to see them as separate entities fully formed in my imagination. There were times when the spelling of names changed: Lily vs Lilly, and though it wasn't a big deal, it was disconcerting. Some grammar issues and POV shifts occurred every now and then, but this was for the most part, a clean novel with a good story.

I enjoyed the literary device of a story within a story, that left me thinking about this novel long after I read the last word. It is a good story that encompasses prejudice and marginalization and the fear that is unavoidable in the human condition when these terrible human concepts rear their ugly heads.
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Most of this story is told by Natalie in the first person. She has a strong voice and her motivation comes through quite clearly when in a Solomon like twist she is forced to choose between her young niece and her insane sister while putting her faith in God that the other will be safe.

The descriptions of the city itself and the war torn city of Budapest seem quite detailed and accurate. The meat of the story takes place in a very short time, a matter of days from start to finish. There are sufficient flashbacks to flesh out the motivations of some of the characters but Deszo remains an enigma throughout. Josef also is a confusing character who seems willing to die to save people he only just met and to whom he has no real ties.

***Spoiler Alert***

There is no Happily Ever After here. There is no real ending at all. Although the story ends with the image of the two sisters going off to the showers together, smiling and hand in hand, that ending is the fabricated "Mrs. Tuesday" ending that Natalie wrote for Mila, the ending showing Mila 70 years later. Or is it? For me the ending came in the train station with Natalie joining her sister and leaving Mila with Deszo who she really has no idea if she can trust. Everything after that seems to be the ending written by Natalie. Or wasn't it? If the real ending is suppose to be that Mila returns 70 years later and finally finds out the fate of her aunts then, IMO it needs to be written as a real ending/epilogue and not as part of Natalie's "Mrs. Tuesday" story.

I didn't hate this story, but the unsatisfying ending let me down. It is not a book I would reread or recommend to a friend.
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Suzanne Anderson's "Mrs. Tuesday's Departure" is a fast-paced, exciting story set in Budapest during the German occupation of Hungary late in WWII. Yet the characters often have English-language names ("Kate Blake" is the prime example); the city and country are never explicitly identified; the Germans are called "Black and Reds"; and their principal victims are called, simply, "The Wanted." These names and terms seem to represent the author's attempt to cut her book free from its specific, historical moorings, in order to concentrate on the characters' emotions; even so, the location is unmistakeably Hungarian, and would be even without Anderson's explanation to that effect in her promotional blurb.
The lead character, Kate, tries to protect her twelve-year old niece, Mila, and her (Kate's) twin sister, Lilly, from the "Black and Red" menace. Mila, it appears, is part Jewish on her father's side, if I have correctly understood the story line. Kate's efforts are complicated by a long history of family and romantic tensions, along with some other problems associated with the times. The psychological aspects of the story allow for more than one, indeed, for a multi-layered, interpretation, including what may be some almost supernatural elements: is the story's outcome "real," or does it exist only (or partially) in Kate's (or Mila's) mind?
At times, I was reminded of Christine Arnothy's half-century old, autobiographical classic, "I am Fifteen and I don't want to die," another story of a very young girl in wartime Budapest. But Anderson's novel is about a mature woman, Kate, more than it is about twelve-year old Mila; nor has street warfare come (yet) to Anderson's Budapest; again, unlike Arnothy's.
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