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Multipliers: How the Best Leaders Make Everyone Smarter Audible – Unabridged

4.5 out of 5 stars 226 customer reviews

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By Matthew Lobaugh on June 18, 2010
Format: Hardcover
As an avid business literature reader, I've grown to adopt a strategy for reading books on marketing, leadership, strategy, and the other host of business topics that we all have to be well versed in to lead people and produce results. Typically, I try to find things to read that are based on research or some kind of rigor around best practices. Also, I read the reviews ahead of time and try to get some idea around what return I will get from my time spent with the topics.

I ask myself things like"

"Is this new thinking, or just a rework of some existing ideas?"

" Am I going to be able to improve myself or my abilities from reading this, or is this just to inform me?"

" Is this based on someone's opinion, or is it grounded in some real research?"

"Do I believe that I will be able to take action and apply what I'm reading when I'm done?"

This work brings all of these questions to the right place. If you have to deal with people as part of your role in whatever you're doing, this book will provoke you to think differently about how you engage with the people around you. You will get a very high return on your time and money spent on this book.
Probably the most fun aspect of it is afterward, tracking all the diminishers in your life. If you look at how these people engage and lead, it becomes a really stark and obvious trait that's really, really easy to spot once you've read this book.
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Format: Hardcover
In this book written with Greg McKeown, Liz Wiseman juxtaposes two quite different types of persons whom she characterizes as the "Multiplier" and the "Diminisher." Although she refers to them as leaders, suggesting they have supervisory responsibilities, they could also be direct reports at the management level or workers at the "shop floor" level. Multipliers "extract full capability," their own as well as others', and demonstrate five disciplines: Talent Magnet, Liberator, Challenger, Debate Maker, and Investor. Diminishers underutilize talent and resources, their own as well as others, and also demonstrate five disciplines: Empire Builder, Tyrant, Know-It-All, Decision Maker, and Micro Manager. Wiseman devotes a separate chapter to each of the five Multiplier leadership roles.

Wiseman cites dozens of real-world examples that suggest how almost any organization (regardless of its size or nature) can plan, implement, accelerate, and sustain a human development program that strengthens participants' leadership and management skills that (a) will enable them to multiply the intelligence and capability of the people around them and (b) avoid behaviors that can diminish people's ability and enthusiasm

As Wiseman clearly realizes, people combine some of the best and worst traits of both the Multiplier and Diminisher. Strengths can become weaknesses or vice versa if carried to an extreme. A Talent Magnet, for example, could be especially effective recognizing and attracting high-potentials and then hoard their talents, exploiting them to her or his advantage. A Micro Manager could be especially alert for significant details that others ignore but deny other people's professional development by refusing to delegate tasks to them.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Having been an HR VP and a recruiter for the IT industry and a Fortune 500 company I strongly agree with the concepts presented here. It's a short, easy read and the book is well designed. It does not spend a lot of time on theory despite the credentials of the author and the rigorous research that went into it. Instead it provides examples and "How To" in each chapter.

If you enjoy books like Daniel Goldman's "Emotional Intelligence", Howard Gardener's "Multiple Intelligence", Carol Dweck's "Mindset" and subjects like psychometrics, personality type and temperament you will relate well to this book.

Having said that I think the real value of this book and its main aim is how we can improve ourselves; how each of us can be less of a diminisher and more of a multiplier. You WILL recognize yourself and others in this book.

I have one bit of advice if you plan to read this book - take the test first. It is located at [...]
I have taken a LOT of psychometric tests in my time and this one is very new so its easy to game if you have read the book. Take the test, THEN read the book.

I do plan on implementing what I have learned and the implementation strategy they recommend is not onerous.
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Format: Hardcover
I've read dozens of business books and books about leadership; I have many years of experience as a manager and an MBA. But here's the thing... I do my best to get out of seminars on management/leadership classes and I'll do anything to avoid reading one more repetitious and unoriginal book about how to be a better manager or leader. So... how did I get to writing a review about: "Multipliers: How the Best Leaders Make Everyone Smarter"?

I'm lucky enough to work for an employer who decided to get Liz Wiseman and Greg McKeown to give a bunch of their managers an accelerated one-day 'multipliers' talk based on their book (before it was published so I read it a few months later). As I've mentioned before I'm a skeptic. Most of this management stuff is repetitious BS and it's all about the authors/presenters talking about what made them the great managers and leaders that they are today. I didn't have much of a choice about attending and as I listened to Greg and Liz speak about their research and present raw unedited video clips about some of the multipliers they were writing about in their book something changed.

They were offering practical advice about how to be not just a better leader but a better person. What's leadership about? It's not about about being better than everybody else on your team - it's about getting the most out of them. That's what this book is about. The examples are concrete and the advice and techniques are down to earth and useful to everyone from a parent to a C-level executive.

There isn't a day that goes by when something from Multipliers doesn't influence what I do and how I lead.
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