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Murder in Mumbai: A Dutton Guilt Edged Mystery by [Calamur, K. D.]
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Murder in Mumbai: A Dutton Guilt Edged Mystery Kindle Edition

4.4 out of 5 stars 20 customer reviews

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Length: 184 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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Product Details

  • File Size: 769 KB
  • Print Length: 184 pages
  • Publisher: Dutton (July 17, 2012)
  • Publication Date: July 17, 2012
  • Sold by: Penguin Group (USA) LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B007FEPP4K
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #978,705 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By TChris TOP 500 REVIEWER on July 17, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition
Murder in Mumbai is a police procedural -- or maybe a journalist procedural -- set in modern Mumbai. Two men burglarizing an apartment find a body in a trunk. Inexplicably, they decide to dispose of the body in a garbage dump rather than leaving it where they found it. The dead woman was the CEO of a corporation. Among the murder suspects are the woman's unfaithful husband, a ruthless competitor, and a subordinate whose career benefited from the woman's death.

The best murder mysteries plant clues that give the reader a chance to solve the murder. Krishnadev Calamur makes a clumsy attempt to do so, but given that the improbable motive for the murder isn't revealed until the closing pages, a reader spotting the murderer will be relying on guesswork rather than detective skills. Still, the straightforward plot is moderately interesting.

The same cannot be said of the novel's characters. The two central characters are stereotypes. Inspector Vijay Gaikwad is the honest cop surrounded by corruption and bureaucracy. Jay Ganesh is the fiercely dedicated crime reporter, a veteran print journalist who complains that the new kids at the paper don't know how to write. His investigation provides Gaikwad with the break he needs to solve the murder. But for their enjoyment of chai tea and biscuits, the two characters might as well be Americans. They are thin and unoriginal, lacking in personality.

Calamur strives to be profound in his observations of evolving Mumbai and insightful in his comments about human nature but rarely rises above the obvious. Gaikwad's supposed pride in the self-confidence of modern women in Mumbai seems more like the author's commentary on a changing country than a realistic character trait.
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Format: Kindle Edition
In a strange way, Murder in Mumbai reminds me of William X. Kienzle's The Rosary Murders. A cop and a reporter compete--and at times co-operate--to solve a murder in their gritty city against a backdrop of changing religious hierarchy. Except in The Rosary Murders, the city is Detroit in the 1970's, the religious hierarchy is the Catholic church, and the culture is reeling from the recent civil rights movement and Vatican reform. In Murder in Mumbai, the city is Mumbai, India, the hierarchy is the caste system, and the culture is shifting as it adjusts to the new Mumbai in what was once the old Bombay. The movie version might star Frieda Pinto rather than Donald Sutherland but I could definitely see it as a gritty police drama.

Though Murder in Mumbai is short (it comes in at just 169 pages on my Kobo, including introductory pages) I felt I really got a sense of life in the fast-paced and ever-changing city of Mumbai. The murder mystery storyline was accessible and relatively easy to follow, though, like The Waterman's Daughter, the real star of the novel was the setting itself.

For more reviews, please visit my blog, CozyLittleBookJournal.

Disclaimer: I received a digital galley of this book free from the publisher from NetGalley. I was not obliged to write a favourable review, or even any review at all. The opinions expressed are strictly my own.
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Format: Kindle Edition
This is one of those special novels that open the eyes of the reader to the truths of the East, and, in this case in particular, India.

The author, who grew up there, seems to have a love and hate relationship not with his country, but with the city where the action of this book takes place:

"Anyone who's lived in Mumbai will understand this: You love it; you hate it; you loathe it; you embrace it."

Well, the two main characters here, Inspector Vijay Gaikwad and journalist Jay Ganesh, seem to share these feelings. They love their city, but they hate its wealth and its poverty, the never-ending traffic jams, the way that the system operates and the fact that no two people are the same under the sun.

For instance, we learn, that if a foreigner or a rich man gets murdered there's an outcry in the press and the politicians lean heavily on the shoulders of the cops and want instant results, while if a poor man is killed he hardly gets a mention in the broadsheets or the radio.

The victim in this case is not only rich, but a foreigner as well. Her name is Liz Barton and she's the CEO of a mining company. Who killed her and why? The truth is that she did have a lot of enemies: an environmentalist, a man who's been left behind in order for her to take the position that was meant for him in the company, a husband who's unhappy and unfaithful, and probably an opponent from some other company.

Gaikwad is ordered to investigate the case, but in order to do that maybe he just has to cut a deal with the devil. Who's that? None other than Jay Ganesh.
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Format: Kindle Edition
The overall plot was interesting. The descriptions about the setting, classes, its customs and traditions, I have to admit, felt like I was reading a textbook. That isn't necessarily bad, I felt like I learned some things. I found myself skipping through some of the descriptions , as I felt like it was repetitive information. I admired the integrity and honesty of the main characters Gaikwad and Ganesh on their journey to solve the mystery of who murdered Liz Barton, not willing to just come up with an answer, but wanted to come up with the right answer. I would have liked them to have more personality though. I had no idea who the murderer was, and couldn't even guess. At the end, it's like "Ohhh, now I get it." There were motives for her murder presented through the story, but the actual motive wasn't revealed until the end.
It definitely wasn't a waste of time, but I didn't find it to be exceptional.
I was given this book for free in exchange for a review.
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