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Music (Blu-Spec CD) Import

4.4 out of 5 stars 16 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

Japanese Blu-Spec CD pressing of this classic album. The Blue Spec format takes Blu-ray disc technology to create CD's which are compatible with normal CD players but provides ultra high quality sound. Includes one bonus track Pocket Money. Sony.

Product Details

  • Audio CD (March 31, 2009)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Import
  • Label: Epic Japan/Zoom
  • ASIN: B001QL35CM
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,117,939 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

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Music

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
Carole King's "Music" is not an overlooked masterpiece (it sold over four million copies upon its release), but certainly one which has been forgotten over the years. Perhaps too closely released on the heels of "Tapestry", "Music" has certainly been overshadowed by that previous trademark, landmark work.
With "Music", King experiments with some new sounds and styles, such as the R & B track "Brother, Brother" which opens the album with a sound reminiscent of the tune "What's Going On?" The title track is a truly uplifting jazz waltz with an incredible sax improvisation as a centerpiece.
The simplicity and honesty of "It's Going To Take Some Time" is stunning and certainly surpasses The Carpenter's more orchestrated version of the tune during the same year. Throughout "Music", she effectively utilizes a pair of strong female backup vocalists who strengthen King's own delivery of her material and who bring a richness and soulfulness to tunes such as "Growing Away From Me" and the Goffin/King standard "Some Kind of Wonderful."
If this album had received as much press and airplay through the years as "Tapestry" did, tunes like "Song of Long Ago" (with background vocals courtesy of James Taylor) and "Carry Your Load" would now be instant classics. As it is "Sweet Seasons" is the only top-10 single from the album and the only one most people would be likely to recall.
Over all, "Music" does not have the musical cohesiveness of her next two projects "Rhymes & Reasons" and "Fantasy", but song for song it certainly contains some of the best material she has ever recorded. Like Tapestry....a classic!
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Format: Audio CD
Carole King pours her passion into her music. The first time I heard this collection on LP I felt the magic. It is my favorite album because it was the first one to introduce me to this rare song writer. I must have worn out that LP and graduated to cassette. I wore that out too. Thanks to CD, I can play it on and on without a worry.

Music followed her landmark album Tapestry both released in 1971. While it did not receive the recognition of the former album, these songs continue in the same soulful path. Carole's genius shines throughout.

The list of Pop and R & B singers who have recorded her songs seems endless. Carole's lyrics are timeless and inspirational for all generatons.
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Format: Audio CD
One of the problems with having the best selling record of all time at any given moment in the history of the musical universe is that you have to follow it up, which is what happened when Carole King put out "Music" at the end of 1971. Once you acknowledge that coming up with another "Tapestry" was going to be impossible, "Music" is actually one King's better albums. King, of course, was a veteran songwriter, who had forged a memorable partnership with Gerry Goffin (her eventual husband). Working in the Brill Building in the early 1960s they had written such hits as "Will You Love Me Tomorrow?" for the Shirelles, "Take Good Care of My Baby" for Bobby Vee, and "The Locomotion" for Little Eva (who just happened to be their babysitter). Everybody from the Beatles to the Monkees to Aretha Franklin recorded songs written by King & Goffin. But after a decade of being just a songwriter, King proved with "Tapestry" she could sing her own songs just fine.

The biggest difference between "Tapestry" and "Music" was that with this next effort King was singing mostly new songs this time around, several of which were written with her new collaborator Toni Stern. The tradeoff ends up being that the melodies are a stronger but that the lyrics are not as sublime as what we heard on "Tapestry." A few of the songs, most notably the opening song "Brother, Brother" and "Carry Your Load," are much more political than what we had heard prior to this from the singer-songwriter. The great irony was that most of King's best songs always sound better performed by somebody else. "(You Make Me Feel Like) A Natural Woman" by Aretha Franklin is the classic example, but on "Music" we have "It's Gonna Take Some Time," which was successfully covered by the Carpenters.
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By A Customer on January 14, 1999
Format: Audio CD
Carole King's "Music" remains one of the most underrated seventies singer/songwriter albums. Tapestry was an almost impossible act to follow, but Music is an outstanding collection of more great songs and winning performances. While it may not hit the peaks that Tapestry did, it is solid and consistent, with, to my ears, no filler. "Sweet Seasons" was a hit, and deservedly so; "Brother, Brother," "Song of Long Ago," "Music," and "Carry Your Load" are other highlights. The whole album projects the combination of warmth and intelligence that is the hallmark of Carole's best music. Confession: I play it more than Tapestry. It never disappoints me.
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
In the early-to-mid 70's, Carole King set the standard for the mellow singer-songwriter genre. She released 4 albums in a row that were achievements anyone would be proud of, and then 2 more that weren't bad at all. This album, her second, was pretty much overshadowed by the giant "Tapestry", her first. But the passage of time allows us to see that it is a valid artistic accomplishment in its own right, not a pale follow-up to "Tapestry". Carole's trademark piano and soft percussion are applied to a variety of impressive songs. "Brother, Brother" is a good strong opener, with its tremolo effect and bongos backing up Carole's vocal about keeping a caring eye on someone she is fond of. "It's Going To Take Some Time" is softer, but still serious, about someone picking up the pieces after a hard fall. "Sweet Seasons" brings us back into the sun again, with its terrific piano hook and lyrics describing the joys of "...a life in the open, a life in the country..." "Surely" is my favorite on the album. It is slow and deliberate and shows quiet power as Carole tries to convince her lover of her loyalty. I especially like the lyric "How does the turtle go? Slowly, surely. That's how my love grows..." The title cut to some extent echoes the jazzy feel of "It's Too Late", but it makes a more positive statement and, accordingly, it is more upbeat. "Song Of Long Ago" is a compact, delicate, folklike song with added vocals by James Taylor. The message of this song is that no matter what's happening to you, the important thing is to FEEL. "Too Much Rain" is slow and deliberate like "Surely", with a less happy ending. And just in case all this mellowness has lulled you to sleep, the final cut, "Back To California", will wake you up.Read more ›
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