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My Kind of Transit: Rethinking Public Transportation Hardcover – April 1, 2009

3.7 out of 5 stars 6 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

Review

"This unique work will inspire scholars and students to research further on this essential and largely untreated topic. It will also pop up on the shelves of those urbanists who ponder wistfully on the loss of great city culture and vital urban social life and imagine the emergence of a more beautiful, more convivial, and more livable urban future."
(Susan Zielinski University of Michigan)


"My Kind of Transit is the first volume I have come across that comprehensively considers transit in terms of those factors that actually determine whether or not people will choose to ride it. Nordahl's humane, and even humanist, arguments recognize and celebrate how transit, if properly designed, can be elevated in the public esteem from loser cruiser to mode of choice. Please, if your work deals in any way with planning or transportation, do us all a favor and read his book."
(Jeff Speck coauthor of Suburban Nation)

About the Author

Darrin Nordahl is the city designer at the Davenport Design Center, which was formed in 2003 as a division of the Community & Economic Development Department of the City of Davenport, Iowa. He has taught in the planning program at the University of California at Berkeley and is the author of Public Produce: The New Urban Agriculture (Island Press).

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Product Details

  • Series: My Kind of Transit
  • Hardcover: 176 pages
  • Publisher: Island Press; 2 edition (April 1, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1930066880
  • ISBN-13: 978-1930066885
  • Product Dimensions: 7 x 0.9 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.8 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #605,008 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By David Dennis on August 12, 2011
Format: Hardcover
People in the public transport business care about unionized workers. They care about creating big projects to get interest from stakeholders. Who they don't care about is customers. Customers, after all, are mostly poor, dispossessed folks who should be glad they have public transport at all.

This book challenges this idea and looks at public transport from the perspective of customers. How can we really get people out of their cars? By making public transport accessible and fun to use. The author talks convincingly about what might make that happen, using a number of real world examples.

I am dubious that people could really be coaxed out of their car, since cars are so much more convenient than trains or busses. But the idea of making public transportation a social space instead of just a utilitarian way to get people from place to place is very appealing.

I somehow doubt that making public transport even slower than it is today is going to make things work for most. But I applaud the author in at least asking questions I have never seen asked before. This book is very much worth reading for the examples, and for people to really think about what could make public transport make sense for at least some people in our age of hustle and bustle.
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By Tom1964 on December 12, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book is unrealistic. It looks at several small transportation systems with boutique-like endearing qualities and then attempts to contrast them with the industrial strenght systems in major metro areas. I kind of felt like my school was using this book to do the author a favor since what he wrote doesn't have a lot of practical application outside of small tourist area public tranportation systems.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is not a book to use for a class. To me it is more of a book for some reading on transportation systems and how they have evolved.
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