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My Name is Aram (Capuchin Classics) Paperback – May 15, 2009

4.6 out of 5 stars 22 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

Review

Book of 14 interconnected short stories by William Saroyan, published in 1940. The book consists of exuberant, often whimsical episodes in the imaginative life of young Aram Garoghlanian, an Armenian-American boy who is the author's alter ego. -- The Merriam-Webster Encyclopedia of Literature --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From the Publisher

William Saroyan's most celebrated work of short fiction- a boy's view of the American Dream. Aram Garoghlanian was a Californian, born in Fresno on the other side of the Southern Pacific tracks. But he was also part of a large, sprawling family of immigrant Armenians--a whole tribe of eccentric uncles, brawling cousins, and gentle women. Through these unforgettable, often hilarious characters Aram comes to understand life, courage, and the power of dreams. Whether it is fierce Uncle Khosrove who yells "Pay no attention to it" in any situation, Uncle Melik, who tries to grow pomegranate trees in the desert, or angelic-looking Cousin Arak who gets Arma into classroom scrapes, Aram's visions are shaped and colored by this turn-of-the-century clan. Like Sherwood Anderson's Winesburg, Ohio, William Saroyan's brilliant short stories in My Name Is Aram work together to create a picture of a time, a place, and a boy's world-a truly classic account of an impoverished family newly arrived in America-rich in matters of the heart.

"He has written so charmingly about his immigrant forebears that we are not only glad ours are Americans... but wish they too had been Armenian."--Georgia Review --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Product Details

  • Series: Capuchin Classics
  • Paperback: 160 pages
  • Publisher: Capuchin Classics; 1 edition (May 15, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0955915635
  • ISBN-13: 978-0955915635
  • Product Dimensions: 5 x 0.4 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (22 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,292,707 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By A Customer on June 16, 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I am a high school student, and we read an excerpt from this book in our literature class. I immediately was intrigued by Saroyan's method of writing and the fact that his novels are autobiographical. This is a story of Aram Garoghlanian, a boy living in Fresno with his large family of Armenian immigrants. Throughout the book, such ideas are touched upon as maturity, honesty, and acceptance. My Name is Aram is a portrait not only of Aram Garoghlanian and William Saroyan himself, but Americans in general. Americans struggle with basic values and ideas everyday, and accepting our eccentric family members is something we learn to do. Saroyan describes small details in hi writing that bring the story to life and open up a new world. Readers will soon realize when they open this novel that each of us holds Aram inside us, whether it means we struggle with the idea of stealing a horse or keeping the families reputation. I strongly recommend this book to anyone.
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By A Customer on February 23, 1999
Format: Mass Market Paperback
The book is composed of different events that happened in the author's life. It is the life of an Armenian immigrant family in the beautiful San Juaquin Valley. Although, the story is about events that are happening in a particular Armenian family, in reality it is the life all immigrants in America. The stories some how effects all Americans. I am positive that some where in our lifetime we were criticized for a certain cultural trait. It is the story of the ultimate underdog who is determined to succeed. At the same time it is a very fun and easy book to read. I could not put the book down.
Saroyan has to be the best writer to come out of the West. He should have been recognized more for his genius work.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book, along with "The Human Comedy", comprises the essential William Saroyan experience. I would rate this book slightly below "The Human Comedy" in terms of the nature of the stories and the development they undergo -- but in Saroyan-land, even underdevelopment is superior to most other authors. This book is a series of seemingly disconnected short stories involving a small cast of characters, so you can read a chapter, put it down, and not have that feeling of incompleteness that George Lucas always left you with at the end of each Star Wars movie. Just one of the stories was worth the cost of the book -- the teflon cousin who breezes through life in the classroom with the blame for all of his sins somehow falling onto those nearby. No, he doesn't get his comeuppance, but the accusers (a classroom teacher and a principal) somehow get theirs, and in an completely unexpected and humorous way.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
This is a nice small book of short stories which offers a pleasing weekend or evening read. Book is about a young boy by name Aram Garoghlanian and his family, Armenian immigrants living in Fresno, CA. It describes Aram's adventures during his early teenage years and events happening in his great and proud tribe of Garoghlanians.

Book is base on episodes of the author's childhood, and the characters of Aram's tribe are based on real individuals, Saroyan's relatives. The book is sensitive and pleasant, and each of the 14 chapters, is written as a separate short-story.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
"My Name is Aram," is a literary classic
with easy vocabulary, great humor and
appealing imagination, that makes it unforgettable.
The author, William Saroyan, was a
genius who won great praise for his
many other works. This book is a gem
which should not be forgotten. Young,
old, learners of all types, and those who
recognize the superior aesthetic experience
provided by inspired books will want to keep
this on their bookshelves. It is an amusing
and warmhearted look at multicultural America
from the point-of-view of poor Armenian boys
growing up in rural California long ago. Organized in
short, linked chapters of believable adventures
by inventive young boys, it is simply a wonderful
book.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
we love all the Ralph Moody books, the Nancy Drew books, the Louis L'Amour books, the Dick Francis books and the Nancy Drew books. It's so nice to be able to get the books we want on Amazon books. Thank you so very much.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
"My Name Is Aram" is a collection of short stories set in Fresno, California in the early 20th century featuring a boy named Aram and his extended Armenian family. The stories are essentially in chronological order and include recurring characters, but the book isn't truly a novel, as all the stories are self-contained and could really be read in any order.

Most of the stories in "My Name Is Aram" are superbly written gems of short fiction. The first, "The Summer of the Beautiful White Horse," has frequently been anthologized and with good reason: it is an expertly crafted short story, with a childlike sense of wonder and some unforgettable characters (such as the easily irritated Uncle Khosrove, who reacts to EVERYTHING by shouting "It is no harm! Pay no attention to it!"). Another favorite is the offbeat "Locomotive 38, the Ojibway," about a wealthy, eccentric Native American who wanders into Aram's town. These are two stories that everyone should read at least once. I also particularly enjoyed "The Circus" (Aram can't resist skipping school whenever the circus comes to town), "The Pomegranate Trees" (about an attempt by Aram's uncle to grow a field of pomegranate trees in harsh desert land), and "The Three Swimmers and the Grocer from Yale" (on the way home from a swim, Aram and two other boys encounter a very strange grocer). A couple of the other stories have a somewhat sad or serious tone, which helps balance the book as a whole.

Many of these stories reminded me of the works of Jean ("A Christmas Story") Shepherd. Aram is often getting into minor trouble and clashing with the authority figures at school, but even when they're punishing him, most of the adults realize he's just being a kid.
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