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My Sister the Moon Mass Market Paperback – September 3, 1995

4.5 out of 5 stars 76 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

While it successfully recreates the culture of the whale-hunting Aleuts of 9000 years ago, Harrison's sequel to Mother Earth, Father Sky (600,000 paperback copies in print) lacks the tense grittiness of its predecessor.
Copyright 1992 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From School Library Journal

YA-- Set in the prehistoric Aleutian Islands, this is a sequel to Mother Earth, Father Sky (Doubleday, 1990). At her birth, Kiin's father had planned on killing her so that his wife might immediately produce a son. She is saved, however, when the chief claims her as the wife for his infant son. Her life is one of difficulty and abuse--her father beats her regularly and gives her to traders for the night to improve his exchanges--but her inner strength enables her to survive through the turbulent, stormy times. This moving story keeps readers in its grip because every hint of peacefulness is upended by another difficulty. Although YAs will enjoy this novel as much as its predecessor, it is more disturbing as the excellent characterizations involve readers significantly, causing them to share the tense emotional drama with Kiin.
- Jacque line Craig, W. T. Woodson High School, Fairfax, VA
Copyright 1992 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.
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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 416 pages
  • Publisher: Avon (September 3, 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0380718367
  • ISBN-13: 978-0380718368
  • Product Dimensions: 4.2 x 1 x 6.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (76 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,026,790 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
These are a great trio of books, and I love Sue Harrison's writing. But I must warn customers not to buy through Kindle. In this book, "My Sister the Moon" 2 significant plot points were doubled...you know, you're reading then suddenly you're reading a totally different "occurrence"...then it goes back to what you were reading, and 10 pages up ahead is what you read 10 pages back. Of course, by that time, it's already spoiled for you. So, great books-just-whoever set this book up to be "Kindleized" did a poor job.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
My Sister the Moon is the second book in the Ivory Carver Trilogy by Sue Harrison. It picks up several years after the first book and follows the same tribe that was formed with Chagak, although the book doesn't focus on her this time.

This time it focuses on Kiin, who is only named part of the way into the book because she is so despised by her father. Instead of being left for dead as an infant, the leader of the tribe decided to betroth his son to her and thus force her father to let her live. Because she was not a son, he did everything in his power to make it rough for her. Add in a brother who is jealous and Kiin had a rough childhood. And it didn't stop there, shortly after marrying the leader's son, her brother kidnaps her and sells her, just when she's learned she's pregnant.

Kiin is another strong woman, just like in the previous book. She has a lot of hardships thrown at her and the world is especially cruel to her, but she perseveres anyway. And she also has a lot of talent, which helps her try to rise in the world. Although she is still at the mercy of the men around her for the most part. Which is discouraging, but relevant to the time period. Again, the bad guys in this are bad with no redeeming qualities and while you can understand their motives, they still don't seem quite real because they are so bad.

There were so many twists and turns in this book. Just when you think good is going to prevail something else happens to screw it up. The theme for this book was very heavily weighted towards power. Everyone wants power and control and don't really care if it hurts others in the process. Because of this the book is pretty dark with topics covering rape, incest and lots of violence.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
This is a book i will probably never get rid of. it's one of those books that leave you so excited, you don't really want the story to end, but you're glad it ends for the characters' sakes.

kiin is a beautiful young woman in prehistoric alaska who is hated by her father so much he beats her constantly and gives her a name that means "no one" or "nothing" i forgot which.

when kiin is old enough, she prepares to be married to the brother of the young man she really loves. while she aches for her heart's desire, the man she loves is soon to be sent away after her marriage.

after she has moved in with her lover's brother and his family and is already a few months pregnant, kiin is kidnapped by her brother, raped by him, and taken to a distant village where she is sold to a man in trade who already has two wives -- all by her own brother.

kiin's courage and perseverance is what gets her home again. but her second husband persues her once she has run away and proceeds to fight with her first.

this is where the novel ends. the real ending is revealed in the next novel: My Brother the Wind.

who lives and who dies? who does kiin go home with? find out.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
My mother's now-deceased school librarian friend recommended this book to my mother, as something she thought I would enjoy. I was 11 or 12 at the time. I loved it, and read it over and over. Until it fell to pieces, and I got a new copy, which also fell to pieces.

Knowing my mom and her friends, they probably figured I'd adore Kiin, and were probably trying to inspire some tough/strong/independent female feelings in me. At the time, though, I only knew that this was a fabulous book. I loved the historical detail, the complicated relationships between characters, and how Sue Harrison made the characters and their culture seem close and accessible.

The summarized plot can read like a string of deeply depressing traumas -- Kiin is abused since birth, remainds unnamed until she is about 15 or 16, is given a degrading name when she finally is named, is raped, is kidnapped, and so forth. But I was never depressed. I wouldn't say I was uplifted, either, but the book gave me a lot to think about. It's a genuine prize in a genre with so much junk.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Interesting way of thinking about ancestors of Inuit people. Kept my interest as did the first book: Mother Earth, Father Sky. My Brother, the Wind (3rd book) got too convoluted for me... people moving from one colony to the other etc., not as enjoyable a read. Only sexual content was reference to it being done and hands & mouth moving over body. Very short episodes and only a very few for the size of the book.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I enjoyed the first book to a poiont but was in need of more of a light read. found it tough going. Not that the author doesnt take you on a historically interesting journey.- just often to sad or brutal to get through. DId not finish it.
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