Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

My Son Marshall, My Son Eminem: Setting the Record Straight on My Life as Eminem's Mother Hardcover – Bargain Price, November 1, 2008

3.8 out of 5 stars 40 customer reviews

See all 8 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover, Bargain Price, November 1, 2008
$23.47 $20.24
Paperback
"Please retry"
$496.84

This is a bargain book and quantities are limited. Bargain books are new but could include a small mark from the publisher and an Amazon.com price sticker identifying them as such. Details

Popular & highly-rated in Biographies & Memoirs
Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail
Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail
Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions


Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

One of the most embattled celebrity mothers in the U.S. pop culture landscape, first-time author Nelson has suffered repeated insults and accusations from son and rap star Eminem, aka Marshall Mathers, who paints her as a negligent (if not malignant) mother and drug abuser. In this memoir, Nelson tells her side of the story, coming clean with a detailed but defensive account of their complicated mother-son relationship. Beginning with her turbulent marriage to Mathers' father, Bruce, through her 2000 attempt to sue Marshall for defamation (she claims it was just a way to save her home from foreclosure) and their present estrangement, Nelson insists throughout that her only concern is for sons Marshall and Nathan; readers-especially the Eminem fans likely to fill her audience-may think she protests too much. Still, it's easy to believe the theatrical rapper exaggerates, and Nelson's insight-especially into Marshall's relationships with wife Kim and daughter Hailie-attest to an ongoing connection that he and/or the media may have obscured or denied. Though readers may find it hard to reconcile Debbie's claim never to have exploited her son in the pages of a tell-all about him (complete with baby pictures), Nelson's urgent voice sketches a tense but sympathetic portrait of the elusive, mercurial MC.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Review

FROM PUBLISHERS WEEKLY: One of the most embattled celebrity mothers in the U.S. pop culture landscape, first-time author Nelson has suffered repeated insults and accusations from son and rap star Eminem, aka Marshall Mathers, who paints her as a negligent (if not malignant) mother and drug abuser. In this memoir, Nelson tells her side of the story, coming clean with a detailed but defensive account of their complicated mother-son relationship. Beginning with her turbulent marriage to Mathers¹ father, Bruce, through her 2000 attempt to sue Marshall for defamation (she claims it was just a way to save her home from foreclosure) and their present estrangement, Nelson insists throughout that her only concern is for sons Marshall and Nathan; readers‹especially the Eminem fans likely to fill her audience‹may think she protests too much. Still, it¹s easy to believe the theatrical rapper exaggerates, and Nelson¹s insight‹especially into Marshall¹s relationships with wife Kim and daughter Hailie‹attest to an ongoing connection that he and/or the media may have obscured or denied. Though readers may find it hard to reconcile Debbie¹s claim never to have exploited her son in the pages of a tell-all about him (complete with baby pictures), Nelson¹s urgent voice sketches a tense but sympathetic portrait of the elusive, mercurial MC. (Nov.) --Publishers Weekly
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

The latest book club pick from Oprah
"The Underground Railroad" by Colson Whitehead is a magnificent novel chronicling a young slave's adventures as she makes a desperate bid for freedom in the antebellum South. See more

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 226 pages
  • Publisher: Phoenix Books (November 1, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1597775967
  • ASIN: B005EP2WSE
  • Product Dimensions: 6.4 x 0.9 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (40 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,197,801 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Okay, so I just finished reading this book. If nothing else, it is extremely entertaining. I bought it 2 days ago, and finished the book now even through my 12-hour work days. Let me start by saying that I have been a huge Eminem fan since I was very young. I lived an extremely similar life to his, growing up with a very similar mother, foster siblings, and many of the struggles he has rapped about; so when I heard about this book I just HAD to read it. We have all heard the stories about his mother in his songs, and I NEEDED to hear her side of things. However, how much truth you can place on this book is kind of up to the imagination.

Let's start with this: Marshall Mathers is a fraud, he fabricated a persona of a man who had a tough childhood and problems with his mother to get famous. When she inquired about this, he would say "it's just a joke". None of the troubles he raps about actually happened, it is just a big hoax to sell records and scam the public into believing this to make money. Eventually, he started believing his own lies and now believes he actually did have a rough childhood. (Obviously I do not believe this - but this is what his mother will have you believe)

The biggest thing that made me question the facts and reality of this book was Debbie's persistence that she was an angel. Not once in this book will you see her say she did anything at all wrong. Oh, I'm sorry. She said that it was wrong of her to tell her son "I wish it was you instead of Ronnie" but followed it up with a slew of excueses, saying that she was under pressure and Kim had randomly had her furniture reposessed for absolutely no reason. Whatever. But that's it.
Read more ›
2 Comments 18 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
My Son Marshall, My Son Eminem is both the life story of Eminems mother Debbie Nelson and her interpretation of her sons life and her relationship with him. Debbie writes about their family history, their relationship, his passionate but notoriously stormy relationship with Kim, his early interest in music and how fame has impacted their lives. It is fairly well-written and makes for an engaging read but there were times I felt the book should be called "I'm Not A Bad Person" because that was the message she was clearly trying to hammer home to the reader by unnecessarily mentioning the charity work she does and compliments of being sweet and good that she gets from others.

A major problem I had with this book was that there are numerous assertions made by Debbie which do not stand up to any kind of scrutiny. Debbie make the following inaccurate claims:

- that Eminem is controlled Kim and always gives into her but if that were true then he would not have released the songs about killing his wife which both Eminem and Kim have said she hated and did not want released
- when Eminem and Kim first lived together Kim faked their burglaries but in fact Eminem witnessed the burglar and chased him (which makes me wonder how many of the other numerous accusations she makes about Kim are untrue)
- Debbie took Nathan to visit Kims work and found that her receptionist job at a health spa was a cover for prostitution and there was a menu of sexual services available. Since prostitution is illegal in Michigan I don't believe that a brothel hand menus of sexual services to anyone who just walked in off the street
- that the Kim Basinger character in the film 8 Mile comes onto her son. I have seen the film multiple times and that never happens.
Read more ›
1 Comment 41 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition
As someone with a mother who utterly failed as a parent, and seeing the constant excuses and lack of responsibility on her part, I get the same impression from Debbie Mathers. This entire book comes across as just one big excuse, a weak attempt to garner pity and cash in on her son’s fame. While I did finish reading, mostly to see if there was ever any sort of admission for wrongdoing, I found the book to be fake and insincere, overall.
Comment 9 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I'm an Eminem fan and bought this book electronically not long after purchasing Eminem's book. I went in without bias. While I believe that at least some of it is probably true, I also believe a lot of it is pure BS. She makes herself out to be some innocent angel! It also occurred to me that probably inside her head what she wrote is her own reality and spin on things. It just doesn't ring true to me.
Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I'm a huge fan of biographical media but I guess I've stuck to more of the AUTObiographical or authorized type up to this point. If you are an Eminem fan and you'd like to know how his mom thinks he became the way he is ("And I am whatever you say I am"), this book will make you very happy. If you're interested in the human condition and you can't imagine why Eminem would say/do some of the things he says/does, you might get a better understanding of things through this book but you'd get the most clear idea by reading his own work.

Mother and son were estranged for at least 8 years by the time Debbie wrote this, so a lot of what she says about his recent life is pure speculation. Most of the book is defensive and maybe even annoying. No mom is as good a parent as she claims to have been. The way she told the story made me wish I had grown up at her house, but I know that every family has their own "closet" to be cleaned. I only bought this book because Eminem's book is not available in a Kindle version and I didn't have time to order and wait on his. Reading this book as an alternative to that one was like going to the movies but standing outside the building with a cup up to it and your ear; not worth the effort, but it wasted some time. Save your money and get his book instead. It's not that I'm counting on Eminem to be totally fair and balanced but surely, his mom is hurt, confused and maybe a little bitter. Probably A LOT bitter.
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Pages with Related Products. See and discover other items: audible book