Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Qty:1
  • List Price: $16.95
  • Save: $3.23 (19%)
FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
Mysterious Patterns: Find... has been added to your Cart
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Good | Details
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: 2014. A good hardcover ex-library book with usual library markings, clean pages, and moderate cover wear. The dust jacket is covered in mylar. Booksavers receives donated books and recycles them in a variety of ways. Proceeds benefit the work of Mennonite Central Committee (MCC) in the U.S. and around the world.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 3 images

Mysterious Patterns: Finding Fractals in Nature Hardcover – April 1, 2014

4.2 out of 5 stars 11 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$13.72
$7.66 $7.20

Fish in a Tree
Make This Summer A Classic
The uplifting and unforgettable New York Times bestselling, Schneider Award-winner that's perfect for fans of "Wonder." Hardcover | Kindle book | See more for ages 9-12
$13.72 FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books. In Stock. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Frequently Bought Together

  • Mysterious Patterns: Finding Fractals in Nature
  • +
  • Growing Patterns: Fibonacci Numbers in Nature
  • +
  • Blockhead: The Life of Fibonacci
Total price: $40.59
Buy the selected items together

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Gr 3–6—The team who explored the Fibonacci sequence in Growing Patterns (Boyds Mills, 2010) returns with a similar book about fractals. Until 1975, there was no name for shapes in nature in which smaller parts looked like the whole shape. Then mathematician Benoit Mandelbrot, who had been thinking about and studying these patterns, named them fractals. Using clear text and outstanding color photographs, Campbell explores the concept of these unusual shapes. Beginning with circles, cones, and cylinders, she leads readers carefully and concisely through examples of fractals such as trees, rivers, mountains, broccoli, lightning, and lungs. The photographs, sometimes highlighting the ever-smaller pieces of a vegetable fractal against a black background, sometimes drawing back to give a aerial view of a geological feature, are crisp and precise and underscore the clear text. The book invites readers to construct a geometric fractal as a hands-on exemplar of the concept. An afterword reveals more of Mandelbrot's background and work, which will be an inspiration to budding scientists/mathematicians.—Marge Loch-Wouters, La Crosse Public Library, WI

From Booklist

The creators of Growing Patterns: Fibonacci Numbers in Nature (2010) present another mathematical concept related to patterns and fractals. After introducing classic geometric shapes, the discussion shifts to Mandelbrot’s observations of fractals with a brief explanation (“Every fractal shape has smaller parts that look like the whole shape”) and a series of examples. In the first, a line segment branches into a Y, with each arm branching again and again into ever smaller Y’s, while an adjacent photo shows a bare-branched tree. Many clear color photos illustrate the examples, which include a broccoli crown, a clustered flower head, lightning, and a mountain range. The latter may be hard for children to grasp as an example of fractals, as there’s little clarification and no graphic aid apart from a photo of mountain peaks. The afterword comments on Mandelbrot and some possible applications of his ideas (invisibility cloaks, anyone?). While clearer explanations would have made this a stronger book, this beautifully designed volume is a useful resource and, apparently, the only children’s book devoted to fractals. Grades 3-5. --Carolyn Phelan
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New York Times best sellers
Browse the New York Times best sellers in popular categories like Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Books and more. See more

Product Details

  • Age Range: 7 - 10 years
  • Grade Level: 2 - 5
  • Lexile Measure: 1040L (What's this?)
  • Hardcover: 32 pages
  • Publisher: Boyds Mills Press; SEW edition (April 1, 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1620916274
  • ISBN-13: 978-1620916278
  • Product Dimensions: 0.5 x 11.5 x 8.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #96,231 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
I have taught math for over 40 years and I love introducing complex math topics with concrete examples. Both Mysterious Patterns: Finding Fractals in Nature and Growing Patterns: Finbonacci Numbers in Nature are two of my favorite books to use with my middle school students. Students tend to think of mathematics as being arithmetic, just numbers. These books beautifully illustrate how mathematics manifests itself in nature. After reading this book, I never look at broccoli or Queen Anne's Lace the same way: they are a mathematical miracle manifested in nature. Sarah Campbell's books also use very precise terminology, but in a way that is easy to understand. That is important for students to learn to discuss real mathematical problems with precise terms. And then there is the photography. Each photo makes the concept of fractals easier to understand and to marvel at. Recently I went hiking with my grandchildren in Great Smoky Mountain National Park. I enjoyed watching them pick up acorns, leaves, sticks, rocks, and marvel at the treasures they discovered. Sarah Campbell's books help me continue this conversation with my grand kids when we look at the beautiful photos in her books.
Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Charming book that teaches and illustrates a math concept that is not often taught in schools. I loved it, and would recommend it for grades K through 6. Teachers, librarians, grandparents, parents -- if you have a kid that loves math and you're struggling to think of a gift, this makes the perfect choice. It's unlikely that the child has ever seen anything like it before.
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
Sarah certainly doesn't shy away from tackling the tough subjects in math and science, making them accessible to bright young minds. Mysterious patterns takes on fractals! It's an enormous topic and this book offers a nice intro for budding geniuses. In fact, I often use Sarah's books (Growing Patterns too) to help explain these big ideas to my adult students!
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
This is a beautiful and simple introduction to fractals. The photo of mathematician Benoit Mandelbrot as a boy on one of the closing pages is a nice finishing touch. I checked Mysterious Patterns out of the library for my twelve year old, but everyone in the house has admired it. I hope this author/photographer team finds more ideas for similarly elegant books. (Hooray for the nameless librarian who suggested the fractals topic. Please, suggest some more.)
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
This is a great book to introduce the concept of fractals to young people. I read this book with my ten year old son who is a lover of math and we both enjoyed the content and the illustrations. How interesting that until 1975 there wasn't a name for fractals...
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
A terrific nonfiction book to introduce the fairly complex concept of fractals (shapes that have smaller parts that resemble the larger, overall shape). Clear text and well-chosen photos are the strong points. I might have given this 5 stars if the typeface and design felt more modern.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Mysterious Patterns: Finding Fractals in Nature
Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more about Amazon Giveaway
This item: Mysterious Patterns: Finding Fractals in Nature

Pages with Related Products. See and discover other items: my math, math connects