Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Qty:1
FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books.
Temporarily out of stock.
Order now and we'll deliver when available.
Order now and we'll deliver when available. We'll e-mail you with an estimated delivery date as soon as we have more information. Your account will only be charged when we ship the item.
Details
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
In Mysterious Ways: The D... has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $25.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Solid used copy with visible wear.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

In Mysterious Ways: The Death and Life of a Parish Priest Paperback – November 4, 2001

4.3 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews

See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$14.00
$5.00 $0.01

Featured Titles in Fiction
Beloved
Beloved
Beloved
$14.00 FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books. Temporarily out of stock. Order now and we'll deliver when available. We'll e-mail you with an estimated delivery date as soon as we have more information. Your account will only be charged when we ship the item. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover


Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Paul Wilkes is an American writer, speaker, and filmmaker who is best known for his focus on religion, especially Roman Catholicism and its monastic tradition. Wilkes has written for "The New Yorker", "New York Times Magazine", and "Atlantic Monthly". His book, "In Mysterious Ways: The Death and Life of a Parish Priest", won a Christopher Award.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New York Times best sellers
Browse the New York Times best sellers in popular categories like Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Books and more. See more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Grove Press; 1st edition (November 4, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0802138519
  • ISBN-13: 978-0802138514
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.7 x 8.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,042,330 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Paul Wilkes, often seen in the pages of the New Yorker or the New York Times Sunday Magazine writing on issues of faith in the modern age, turns in a compelling biography of a modern-day Catholic cleric. Entering the priesthood in the idyllic 1950s, Joe Greer's expectations were completely upturned by the dramatic changes of Vatican II and the wrenching realities of ministry in inner-city Boston. Rather than enjoying the peace of a well-appointed rectory, Fr. Greer winds up riding the stone-pelted school buses of Boston during the angry days of desegregation. Never claiming sainthood for himself, Greer struggles with very human temptations -- and occasionally falls to them, only to repent and try again. Finally, as the pastor of a suburban Boston church, Joe Greer faces the greatest challenge to faith anyone can confront -- he is diagnosed with a rampant and unyielding form of cancer. How this good man of a faith always open to doubt deals with the most dangerous temptation -- the temptation of despair -- shapes the crux of this well-told spiritual biography
Comment 9 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
This book really shows the day-to-day experience of a parish priest and probably applies to any clergy role. Of course, this book's main subject is, in addition, suffering from a terrible form of cancer. As the book portrays, he tries his best to keep going, even through times of debilitating treatment. By the end of the book, he has learned some painful lessons about delegating responsibility, and when to put yourself first. Still, the priest remains a faithful servant, trying to do God's will and trying at the same time to just survive. The book speaks a great deal to the demands on a clergy person's time and what that means for his/her life. Plus this book focusing on a Catholic priest also reminded me of the stresses in the Catholic church of today. (This book, however, was written more than 10 years ago.) For anyone interested in church life, the book illuminates some constant themes--mainly the need of the priest to serve pastoral and theological needs while, at the same time, making sure the boilers in the buildings are working.
Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Paul Wilkes (born 1938) is an American writer of Slovak origin and filmmaker who is best known for his focus on religion, especially Roman Catholicism and its monastic tradition.

Here are some quotations from this 1990 book:

"And although they were hardly in the vanguard of the spirit that pervaded so many college campuses in the late 1960s and early 1970s, seminarians began to TALK WITH faculty and administration, instead of BEING TALKED TO." (Pg. 47)
"And being priests, who take their days off during the week as Saturdays and Sundays are far too jammed with Masses, weddings, and baptisms, they can indulge their passion (for skiing) without having to deal with the crowds that hamper the weekend skier." (Pg. 80)
"But you don't find too many priests my age standing up and proclaiming celibacy must be maintained. We older priests know that the quality and quantity of men aspiring to the priesthood would be greatly improved and that this tendency toward the feminiizing of the clergy would be checked. I find it very hard to be convincing about celibacy when a young man comes to me, talking about the priesthood. I just can't lie to him that it is all that important anymore." (Pg. 86)
"'A large percentage of the students at Harvard Divinity School are Catholic. The men among them will not be priests, but obviously they are interested in religion. These are the people who very probably would have been in seminary years ago. Now what is the archdiocese doing about them? Nothing,' he mutters, finally sitting down, seemingly driven to exhaustion by the reality." (Pg. 93)
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
God works in mysterious ways but not as mysterious as those of the internet or radio, as you can't see the person behind the voice and email. I wish you could see the beautiful stained glass window on the cover of this library book. It is fantastic. The apostle Paul (formerly called Saul) constanly felt that he was 'weak' and called out to God for guidance. "My strength is shown forth in your weakness." In the methodist church, a preacher called Paul Allen took most of his sermons from Paul's teachings. At a local 'big business' baptist church, he senior pastor Sauer used Paul to prove that the Methodist are deal wrong, but used his teachings instead of those of John the Baptist, as a ranting, out-of-contaol diatribute against the methodists.

Joseph Greer was a dynamic Catholic priest in Massachusetts who often confessed that he, too, felt 'weak.' His was not a weakness of faith or spirit. His body, at the age of 55, was rife with cancer. In his position as parish priest, no problem was too small for his attention and intervention, such as as a parking-lot dispute. A noise problem and ugly artificial owls GSA has over this town is an eyesore and ear-sore, and yet it is too minor to deal with, a "harassment" charge from the director in Nashville who doesn't have to endure the noise pollution he is emiting over this town.

Ordained at the age of 25, his grave illness thirty years later made him spiritually deeper and more intent on serving his parish will all his strength and ability. Even with a bone marrow transplant, his cancer returned. He has to face his own death, as am I, with suffering, humility, and the power of love -- instead of hate. He was an inspiration to all who knew him.

The author was a visiting writer at the University of Pittsburgh when he wrote this book. Others include THE GOOD ENOUGH CATHOLIC, COMPANIONS ALONG THE WAY, SIX AMERICAN FAMILIES, and A YEAR IN THE LIFE OF AN AMERICAN FAMILY.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse