Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Myth Alliances (Myth-Adventures) Mass Market Paperback – July 27, 2004

4.1 out of 5 stars 21 customer reviews
Book 14 of 19 in the Myth-Adventures Series

See all 10 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Mass Market Paperback
"Please retry"
$57.99 $0.01
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
$0.98

Top 20 lists in Books
Top 20 lists in Books
View the top 20 best sellers of all time, the most reviewed books of all time and some of our editors' favorite picks. Learn more
click to open popover

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

Skeev the Wizard is back, flying, so to speak, from a new publisher's masthead. A land of Wuhses has been taken over by 10 female Pervects (who are green, scaly, and fanged, but varied in size, skill, and fashion sense) bent on debt collection. The Wuhses call on Skeev, who, with girlfriend Bunny, sidekick Trollop Tananda, and dragon Gleep, is soon off to troubleshoot or, at least, trouble-negotiate. It soon seems that, while the Pervects may be taking advantage of the Wuhses' economic illiteracy, susceptibility to marketing manipulation, and inability to make a decision without unanimity, they aren't doing all that much harm. On the other hand, they do have the Wuhses producing addictive, magically activated, virtual-reality glasses for export. By the time the Wuhses are shut of the Pervects, satires on marketing, fads, pop psychology, fashion, computers (which are pets in some lands in the book), and many other things have gone down, and the reader has very probably had fun. Roland Green
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

"Give yourself the pleasure of working through the series.  But not all at once; you'll wear out your funnybone."—Washington Times

"Stuffed with rowdy fun."—Philadelphia Inquirer

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New York Times best sellers
Browse the New York Times best sellers in popular categories like Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Books and more. See more

Product Details

  • Series: Myth-Adventures (Book 3)
  • Mass Market Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Ace; 1st Printing edition (July 27, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0441011829
  • ISBN-13: 978-0441011827
  • Product Dimensions: 4.2 x 0.8 x 6.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (21 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #337,497 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Mass Market Paperback
The bad guys aren't really bad; the good guys aren't really good. There is none of the humor, sensibilities, or character of his first three books in the series.

Mr. Asprin can be a fine, funny writer but has a tendency to lose both control and track of his characters. What started out as a fine funny romp in 'Another Fine Myth' has settled down into formulaic nonsense in which the characters don't have character, they have stereotypes. The characters aren't flawed, they are plot points. No exploration of the humor of the human condition, just something else to resolve to extend the text a few pages.

What could be interesting interplay between a not quite mature or worldly boy wizard and a way too worldly Businesswoman Bunny is completely... well... nothing. There is no there there. Tananda has been relegated to a set piece (where is the fiery whimsical assassin who said "Bark at the moon, Istavon"?). The rest of the guys remind me of Michael York's Basil Exposition in the Austin Powers movies. They are simply there to inject or resolve plot points that Rob didn't have the imagination to deal with properly. Also, when did Ahaz become Yoda?

The whole series died somewhere during `Little Myth Marker' and perhaps should have stayed dead.

Let the flames wars begin!
Comment 19 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
As a long time MYTH-series lover, I was so excited to have a new MYTH book to read. I was terribly enthusiastic through MYTH-ION Improbable but my reading pace slowed to a crawl through MYTH Alliances. The plot was predictable, the puns came across as merely a substitute for imagination, and I really didn't feel as if I were getting to know the characters any better. You could see where the plot was headed from chapter 1. Three weeks on my desk and 29 chapters later, it went exactly where I thought it would and took an inordinate amount of time to get there. In addition, Asprin and Nye have taken to making Skeeve's character just plain uninteresting. Before he had his faults, but he was still endearing. Now, he's matured into a standard, boring adult. Bring back the orginal creativity and spark!
Comment 10 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Myth Alliances was a surprise for me. I thought there were no more Myth books from Robert Aspirin (and would be no more), but my husband found them and got them for me. Yay!

This one is the first collaboration work in this series, which gives the name a funny double meaning, applying both to this new alliance between Robert Aspirin and Jody Lynn Nye in writing the series and to the oddball coalition of characters in the book.

It took a while for the two styles to meld, but the story smoothed out and picked up about halfway through. As usual for a Myth book, the story is propped up by a lot of punny jokes and oddball characters. This one features a self-help guru who’s great at winning hearts, minds, and book sales and a showdown between the passive-aggressive Wuhses and their Pervect oppressors. Skeeve has his hands full figuring things out and combatting some seriously dangerous magic.

I couldn’t help but feel that the authors missed an opportunity to build suspense and mystery by revealing a certain key bit of information incredibly early in the book. It didn’t kill the book, but I think that it was mostly responsible for the slow start.

Overall, I really liked this story. I’m glad that the co-author joined in and is keeping the series alive. Folks who enjoy the Myth series will likely enjoy this one, but may not love it because it isn’t quite on par with some of the earlier books.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I enjoy the whole series. Each book is a fun read, but to understand what the later books are referencing in story lines and characters, one must read the series from the beginning. It's worth it and I've been hooked.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Mass Market Paperback
While Myth Alliances is a better book than Something M.Y.T.H. Inc., it is merely a continuing demonstration of the disintegration of the Myth Adventures. Nye's collaboration with Asprin drew him out of the tailspin that the series had entered, but there is not enough upward motion to make it worthwhile.

The tenor of the book is far different from the original seven or eight volumes, which is perhaps the greatest disappointment. Asprin had managed in those old novels to blend a sense of playfulness and crisis. Here, the crisis is present, but the playfulness is not. That is not to say that there is no humor. There are numerous attempts at it, and many of them succeed, but with a different feel. Some are simply subtler such as the inclusion of "Wensely" and "Gouda", which would normally be fine were it not for the fact that the Myth series has heretofore been entirely blunt. You don't go in looking for subtle. Other jokes simply entered into realms that felt awkward for Asprin's characters and universe such as pushing Tananda from the role of occasional seductress into wholly uninhibited vamp. Skeeve, meanwhile, continues to evolve from earnest, thoughtful, and naive hero caught in something greater than his world to generic bumbling hero, a step that strips a first-person narrative from its sympathetic and amusing overtones.

The plotting felt random at times, moving from dimension to dimension and introducing a new obstacle only out of sheer need to keep the storyline going, and while the narrative was good enough to keep me reading, it wasn't enough to cover up this pacing flaw.
Read more ›
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews