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Naked City: The Television Series Paperback – 2008

4.5 out of 5 stars 8 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 218 pages
  • Publisher: Autumn Road Company (2008)
  • ISBN-10: 0972868437
  • ISBN-13: 978-0972868433
  • Product Dimensions: 8.9 x 5.9 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.9 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,789,459 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Jay Bhatt on February 7, 2008
Format: Paperback
An interesting book about one of the better TV series of the 1960s. Naked City was unique in that most of the stories were more about the people of New York than about police procedures. The book contains information about the show's history, relevant commentary from some of the regular cast, guest stars and directors; plus photos, an episode guide for all 138 shows and a bio section of those associated with the series. If you ever enjoyed watching Naked City, I recommend this book.

Jay Bhatt - W. W. Hagerty Library, Drexel University
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Format: Paperback
In "Naked City The Television Series," author Jim Rosin gets to the heart of the matter by interviewing the actors, directors, and executives that made Naked City a reality. And it was just that--a reality. Today's "reality" TV is a misnomer compared to this series, and Rosin's book does a terse little job of explaining why.

One of the actors (Johnny Seven) who is quoted, ties it all together when he says, "What made Naked City so different was that its main star was a superstar: New York City." The realistic location scenes (The series was filmed on the streets of New York) gave this show its edge, and it was a hard edge, even when the episode was one that illustrated the compassion that could be found on those hard streets.

Rosin elaborates on the show's genesis (it was adapted from the 1948 movie), and then synopsizes every episode throughout the TV show's lifetime (It was a 30-minute series 1958-59, then expanded to one hour 1960-63), but he cleverly refuses to spoil the plots, just in case you decide to order some DVDs of the show.

He also gives many of the major players in the series a thorough biography at book's end. Add in the great black-and-white photos of the street action and cast members, and you've got an accurate, handy, and concise history of TV's early days, via one of its best offerings.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I remember first seeing Naked City on local TV during the 1980's. I was instantly hooked. During the aughts, I remembered how much I enjoyed the series and to my delight, I found Amazon.com sold complication videos. I also searched the Internet and found a somewhat "questionable" web site that sold what appeared to be off-the air bootleg copies of entire series of many shows. I passed.

A different "local TV channel" recently ran a. marathon of Naked City I captured on DVR. I've been slowly watching each episode. The storylines, the humanity, the videography. A genuine time-capsule of mid-century New York. Given what this review is about, I am embarrassed to say that I forgot that I even have Mames Rosin's book. I just glanced at it and must say that. Overall, as a basic reference to Naked City, it is good enough.

Unless there was an attempt to avoid "spoilers"' I find that the episode descriptions often lack depth. I gazed at a few "random" episodes and one seemed to imply, let's say, a reconciliation or a positive resolve. It was quite the contrary. The end was tragic and there was no mention of the twists and turns of the storyline which would influence me to REALLY want to see the episode. Instead, the actual episode arguably ranks way up there with Naked City's best. See spoiler alert below.

In addition, the author numbered the episodes in apparent sequence but failed to use the more useful format, Season #, Episode #.

Don't get me wrong. I think this book is useful to both fans and those curious about Naked City. There are photographs and bibliography's of the actors and those behind the scenes. There are also very nice excerpts from interviews as well.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
the interviews were great only one small mistake; dennis hopper and not robert duvall starred in shoes for vinnie winford
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