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Nanga Parbat Pilgrimage: The Lonely Challenge Paperback – December, 1998

4.3 out of 5 stars 9 customer reviews

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Paperback, December, 1998
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Editorial Reviews

Language Notes

Text: English (translation)
Original Language: German
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 384 pages
  • Publisher: Mountaineers Books (December 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0898866103
  • ISBN-13: 978-0898866100
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 5.9 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,393,628 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
This is without a doubt one of the two best mountaineering books. Incredible stories of close shaves and lucky escapes make it clear that the final ending on Chogolisa was bound to happen sooner or later. Only Terray's "Conquistadors of the Useless" reaches the same heights. They don't write them like this anymore ....
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Format: Paperback
You might not find the literary style of this book to be a knockout, but, like Jerzy Kukuzka's "My Vertical World", the content will probably blow you away. Hermann fought his way past numerous obstacles on his way to the summit of Nanga and did so with impeccable style. It's a guaranteed classic.
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Format: Paperback
Everyone interested in Alpine and Himalayan mountain climbing knows of Herman Buhl (Messner considers him the best climber of all time). His feat of survival alone in a bivouac above 8,000 meters on Nanga Parbat is among the most remarkable achievements in the history of Himalayan Mountaineering!
And here is the most significant area where the book comes up short -- it devotes only a short section, at the very end of the book, to this remarkable expedition. Do not be mislead by the title -- this is not a book about this expedition -- it is an autobiography of Buhl, highlighting some of his remarkable achievements in climbing in the Alps.
My second concern about the book is related to the author's style. Of course, it is a matter of personal preference, but I find Buhl's writing as uninspired and dry, as his climbing capacities are outstanding. One simple comparison of the description of the same episode (climbing the north face of the Eiger) by Buhl as compared to that by Gaston Rebuffat (I highly recommend his book "Starlight and Storm"; they found themselves climbing the Eiger at the same time) clearly shows the much more inspired writing of the French (not to mention that Buhl does not even mention Rebuffat, a well known climber in the Alps by then, by name).
If you are really interested in Herman Buhl, I recommend "Climbing Without Compromise", or the "Kurt Diemberger Omnibus".
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book, written by Hermann Buhl, was largely re-written by his friend and editor Kurt Maix, at least according to Reinhold Messner, author of a climber's biography of Herman Buhl. This may be so, but I think this book conveys what Hermann Buhl wanted to say- after all he approved it.

While text such as "[my recollections of Nanga Parbat] are ... shining, alluring visions which sear one's heart and wipe out all memory of distress, worry, and disappointment" does not sound like his words, I think they well describe the sensation. And that is one of the key differences between this book and Messner's book, "Hermann Buhl- Climbing Without Compromise". This book conveys, as a detached writer would, the thoughts and feelings more than the exact words or technical details of Buhl's life. For those who prefer, or want additionally, to "hear" Buhl's own voice, and many more\technical details of his accomplishments, I recommend Messner's book.

FYI, the 1987 Movie "The Climb" only covers Buhl's climb of Nanga Parbat, but keeps fairly close to what is described here, and even "quotes" Buhl from this book.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Herman Buhl was mountaineer beyond belief. He spent his whole life climbing. He didn't care if he was alone or with someone, he just had to climb. No problem on the mountain was too great. He started out guiding on the Matterhorn, and went to harder climbs. Nanga Parbat was the highest peak he could ascend because of political feelings at that time ( 1940-45, WW2). People from his area in Europe weren't even allowed near Everest. He tells of his experiences and thoughts while making his way around Europe climbing all the great ascents of the alps. If you like climbing and mountaineering you need to meet the greatest. You will be amazed
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