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The Narrowing Path (The Narrowing Path Series Book 1) by [Normoyle, David J.]
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The Narrowing Path (The Narrowing Path Series Book 1) Kindle Edition

4.4 out of 5 stars 32 customer reviews

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Length: 264 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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Editorial Reviews

Review

"The quality, the complexity of the story, was easily on par of an adult fantasy. I totally would recommend it for readers who want a hardcore, read brutal, YA dystopian." Tolerably Smart Review Blog

"Take Hunger Games and make it more serious and more brutal." Snips and Snails and Puppy Dog Tails Review Blog

Product Details

  • File Size: 3538 KB
  • Print Length: 264 pages
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
  • Publication Date: November 13, 2013
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00CB4KOTK
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,902 Free in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Free in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition
I found this gem of a book on Netgalley and was struck by the cover: definitely intriguing. The blurb clinched the deal, luring me in . . .

Unable to resist The Hunger Games feel of it, I immediately requested it and am delighted to say that it delivered on all its promises. I started reading in the evening and found myself still awake at three in the morning when I turned the last page on my Kindle. I was so impressed that I filed it into it's own category under the author's name. I only ever do that if I intend reading more of an author's work. The rest of the books get shoved into a genre category.

Okay . . . so what made it so good?

The book is definitely dystopian (thoroughly brutal in fact) but it has a high fantasy setting! Anyone familiar with my blog will know that fantasy and sci-fi are my first loves. That said, one of my reading delights this year has been the discovery of some great cross-over books that mash different genres together - like this one - making for a fascinating read. As far as I can see, it's mainly indie-authors who are daring to write like this, and David J Normoyle has done it very well in The Narrowing Path.

The plot kicks off without too much backstory or preamble and we are in the world of Arcandis, following the fortunes - and misfortunes - of Bowe Bellanger, our young hero. I was instantly sucked in even though the first few pages bombarded me with names and titles and quite complicated aspects of Arcandis life. I admit, it could be an overwhelming beginning, but I was so intrigued by the action that I barreled through it and was hooked.

Bowe Bellanger is a delightfully flawed hero with a giant-sized heart.
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Format: Kindle Edition
This action-packed dystopian was about boys proving to society their worth by surviving the cruel world they are thrown into. And when I say cruel I mean CRUEL! Brutal stuff, I tell ya. The people in this world, the royals, are just ruthless without an ounce of compassion whatsoever, killing anyone they desire/think is in their way. Man...

What I liked about the main character Bowe, was that he was not like these cold-hearted people. On the contrary, he is very compassionate and caring. There were a couple of times when he did annoy me though, thinking he was so much better than, well, basically those at the bottom of the social ladder. He treated them like they had some sort of disease he could catch. Ugh! But that changed over time and he got to see them as people, not slaves.

This world is just a place you do not want to live in, as I said. I don't like the society at all, and I felt so bad for all these boys trying to prove themselves. But in the end, Bowe outsmarts them all. He's really cunning.

Another thing about this world, I found it really confusing in the beginning. We're thrown into this world expected to know all this terminology... Of course, as you read, you figure them out eventually, but some explanation in the beginning would've been nice.

Overall, I thought the book was a good read. It had a very interesting premise and a whole lot of action, though it had more violence than in used to. I'd recommend this one to those who like dystopians with a whole lot of action, fantasy, and a coming of age story.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Amazon recommended this book to me, so I tried it out. As other reviewers have noted, this is not a pleasant world—think the Hunger Games—and horrible things happen, almost indiscriminately. Normoyle teases a few interesting twists, which I imagine will be explored in later books.

The problem with this book comes from the basic conceit of the book: every six years come the Infernum, a period when the surface of the planet gets so hot that it is only possible to survive in underground caverns; anyone left on the surface is condemned to die.

My problem with this book—which I'll explain in a comment so as not to spoil things completely—is that I simply don't understand how the society described in this book could possibly have come about. In other words, to enjoy this book, you'll definitely need to suspend disbelief.
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Format: Kindle Edition
Picture The Hunger Games and The Maze Runner smooshed together, in a slightly fantastical world... that's a good description of The Narrowing Path.

But this story does go deeper than either of those two books/movies into the silo structure of Arcandis' society. Like Divergent, the population is divided into segments. Four ruling houses, the ascor, and a second class citizen class called escay. There's even secret societies and factions and plotting between the ascor houses that comes into play throughout the book. All the political and social nuances of a thoroughly thought out world.

The book sees a 13-year-old Bowe Bellanger enter Arcandis' version of the Hunger Games (one that's held every - sexennium - six years.) the Green Path. Not unlike The Hunger Games, the Path sees the young men aged between 12 and 18 from all the ascor houses forced to fend for themselves and kill each other to secure one of six positions of safety with the ascor houses. The safety is sought because every six years, the moon takes their planet too close to their sun and everything on the face of the planet will perish, unless hidden within the caves cooled by the ocean - this is called the Infernam, but, there's only limited room.

So, we've got our protagonist and our plot, what about the cast of supporting characters? Well they're rather diverse and varied. This was a strong plus for me. Some were stereotypes like The Hunger Games, the fighter, the weakling etc, but others were strong characters in their own right.

I liked Sorrin, the peg legged, Master better. His ability to call a fight thoroughly enjoyable, and his skills were used well to further the story.
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