Buy Used
$6.54
FREE Shipping on orders over $49. Details
Used: Like New | Details
Sold by Ipoonu555
Condition: Used: Like New
Comment: Shrink Wrapped. Brand New Case. CD Like New Condition. Fast Amazon shipping plus a hassle free return policy mean your satisfaction is guaranteed!
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Native Tongue

4.0 out of 5 stars 43 customer reviews

See all 7 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Audio CD, February 16, 1993
"Please retry"
$9.00 $0.95

Stream Millions of Songs FREE with Amazon Prime
Get Started with Amazon Prime Stream millions of songs anytime, anywhere, included with an Amazon Prime membership. Get started

Editorial Reviews

.
  • Sample this album Artist (Sample)
1
30
1:01
Play in Library $1.29
 
2
30
3:49
Play in Library $1.29
 
3
30
5:15
Play in Library $1.29
 
4
30
4:23
Play in Library $1.29
 
5
30
4:14
Play in Library $1.29
 
6
30
4:01
Play in Library $1.29
 
7
30
3:55
Play in Library $1.29
 
8
30
4:13
Play in Library $1.29
 
9
30
0:55
Play in Library $1.29
 
10
30
3:25
Play in Library $1.29
 
11
30
4:41
Play in Library $1.29
 
12
30
4:15
Play in Library $1.29
 
13
30
3:52
Play in Library $1.29
 
14
30
3:32
Play in Library $1.29
 
15
30
4:57
Play in Library $1.29
 

Product Details

  • Audio CD (February 16, 1993)
  • Original Release Date: February 16, 1993
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Capitol
  • ASIN: B000008JI1
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (43 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #78,221 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Amazon's Poison Store

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
80s rock bands didn't have it easy in the 90s. With the overnight popularity of Nirvana and Pearl Jam, just like that, almost instantly, bands like Motley Crue, Poison, Warrant, Skid Row, etc, were suddenly completely passe. Most old-school rockers probably didn't even know what hit them, as they went from the arenas to theatres in just a few short years.

In 1990 Poison were at the top of their game. That year saw the release of their third multi-platinum album "Flesh and Blood" and their first headlining arena tour. Songs like "Unskinny Bop" and "Something to Believe In" dominated MTV and Poison were one of the most popular bands of the very early 90s.

Unfortunately for Poison, however, in the fall of 1991 the band suffered two major blows. First was the release of Nirvana's "Nevermind" which completely changed the landscape of hard rock, and second was the departure of lead guitarist C.C. Deville.

Knowing full well that Poison's brand of power-pop, anthem-laden hard rock was out-of-touch with the times; the band sought a new direction. Guitar virtuoso Ritchie Kotzen was brought in as Deville's replacement, and in early 1992, the band started work on their new album.

Old-school hard rock and metal bands reacted differently to the musical sea change in the early 90s. Some bands like Motley Crue tried to embrace a current sound, whereas others, like Arcade (Stephan Pearcy's post RATT band) and Vince Neil lived in a vacuum, not acknowledging that anything had changed. Poison, however, took a different path. Rather than try to jump on a bandwagon or remain stagnant, the band attempted to mature, while at the same time keeping many elements of their signature sound intact. In early 1993, Poison's new album "Native Tongue" was finally released.
Read more ›
Comment 15 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
I love everything that this band has ever recorded. There is one exeption. Native Tongue, by far, exceeds any album ever written by this great band. I'm not saying that C.C. is not a great guitarist. Kotzen really lifted the band to a higher level of songwriting and maturity that disappeared when DeVille came back. This is without question, the best cd they have ever released!
2 Comments 8 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
When this recording occured, Poison had acquired a great musician in guitarist Klotzen, their audience was maturing and glam metal was becoming no longer fashionable.
Given this and probably wanting to make a recording that would satisfy themselves (ala Ozzy Osbourne in making No More Tears); Native Tongue abandoned all the glam/"bubble gum" aspects that was normally integrated into previous Poison material.
As a result, this recording has fantastic songwriting, musicianship and integrity with a capital I.
Unlike, the Osbourne cd, Native Tongue did not sell because, like Kiss's The Elder, it was hard to accept such a glam band making such a recording as progressive as this.
While not as complex and musically wise; it does contain material the Diamond Head vein.
An undiscovered classic at a bargain price.
For a Poison Cd it gets a 10/10. For a cd in this heavy rock genre, it gets a 7/10
Comment 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
1993's Native Tongue is something of the black sheep of the Poison catalogue. The famous party rockers were faced with two obstacles when recording this album - the departure of guitarist C.C DeVille and the rise of grunge. Overcoming the first obstacle wasn't too tough. C.C, for all his style, wasn't the greatest guitar player and his replacement, Ritchie Kotzen, was a real talent. The second obstacle was a bit trickier. What does a party rock band do when the party ends?

Poison didn't try to go grunge with this album (thankfully), but they did try to get more serious. In this case, that meant a sharp turn into blues rock territory. We caught a couple of hints of that on 1990's Flesh & Blood, but it's way more prominent on Native Tongue. I assume Kotzen, who has some serious blues chops, had a lot to do with that. For a band like Cinderella, the bluesy sound makes sense, but from a band whose previous hits champion looking for "Nothin' But a Good Time," it's a little awkward. There are some fun rock songs here (like "Ain't That the Truth), and the minor hit "Stand" sounds a bit like "Something To Believe In," but for the most part the songs on Native Tongue, technically sound as they are, just don't excite. It didn't help that most of Poison's fanbase was being told that what they used to like was impossibly uncool and that grungy, flannel-clad Seattle bands where what they needed to listen to.

I was a big fan of Poison growing up, and still play their albums from time to time, but Native Tongue rarely gets taken off the shelf. It's a perfectly solid blues-based rock album, but it just doesn't feel like a Poison album. I'd recommend it only to completists or Kotzen fans.
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
By the time Poison released their fourth album "Native Tongue" in 1993, the musical world Poison was accustomed to was literally turned on its head. Long time guitarist C.C. DeVille was replaced by guitar virtuoso Richie Kotzen, the 80's metal scene was fading quickly, and bands like Poison were simply not the large draw they had been in recent years. Poison needed to change several things to remain viable in the 1990s: the band needed to mature their party boy image, lose the spandex and hairspray for flannel and jeans, and concentrate their writing more on social issues rather than sex and good times. Poison effectively did all three things with "Native Tongue," and did them well, but with a more mature sound the band often times seemed a little out of their element. While "Native Tongue" is actually a pretty terrific blues-rock album, it just at times seems hard to believe your actually listening to a Poison record with the change in sound and lyrical content.

To be fair to Poison they weren't jumping on the grunge bandwagon with the release of "Native Tongue." The band was simply continuing with the direction of their "Flesh and Blood" album by incorporating a more blues/funk based sound. I believe that most of the sound change is due to Richie Kotzen's guitar playing and musical input, and you can quickly tell the songs that Kotzen lent his pen and pad to as well. I'm actually a fan of Kotzen's guitar playing and voice on the album, and it makes for a pretty strong effort with just about every song being enjoyable and fresh sounding. By 1993 I'm sure Poison wasn't expecting to reach the heights they had with previous albums; it's an absolute shame that this album didn't win Poison a flock of new fans and bring them more accolades, but such is the world of popular music.
Read more ›
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews




What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Look for Similar Items by Category

Pages with Related Products. See and discover other items: vinyl pop