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Nature's First Law: The Raw-Food Diet Paperback – January 15, 2003

2.7 out of 5 stars 58 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 234 pages
  • Publisher: Maul Brothers Publishing; 6th edition (January 15, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0965353303
  • ISBN-13: 978-0965353304
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 5.3 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 2.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (58 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,023,197 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By D. Read on November 28, 2000
Format: Paperback
I have been gradually transitioning to a raw-foods diet (I have been vegetarian for a little over two years), so I have been reading a ton of books on the subject. It's a good thing that this was not the first one I read. It's a shame that the authors, while being highly motivated and passionate about a raw-food diet, have chosen to advocate the subject in such an in-your-face, absolutist manner. It's really a turn-off. They have taken stances that are easily supported by documented facts, but instead of supporting them with facts, they choose to make raw-foodism sound like a religion. It's not a religion, it's just a way of eating. I'm sure their approach is a turn-on for some people, so perhaps it's good that a book like this exists for those people who need to hear the message this way.
That said, I'd avoid this book until you've read some more sane and well documented books like Dr. Norman Walker's "Enzyme Nutrition," which is the most scientific and documented of all the literature on the subject. Other good books are Ann Wigmore's wheatgrass book and some of her other books; any of the books by Steve Myerowitz; and the "How I Conquered Cancer Naturally" book. I have also heard that two books called "The Raw Life" and "Blatant Raw-Foodist Propaganda" are good. The Natural Hygiene literature is generally very good as well. Take advantage of all the raw food related web sites out there.
Sorry to diverge from the review, but after getting off coffee, soda, aspartame, refined sugar, and other obvious evils, I have been increasing the raw food in my diet gradually to the point where my diet is 80-95% raw most days. The results have been incredible.
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Format: Paperback
When you write a non-fiction book, you are supposed to include references. This book has very, very few. Some of the so-called "references" shouldn't even be included. Here's an example of a reference from Appendix C of the book: "The reason scientists do experiments on animals is because cooked-food addiction has severely clouded everyone's mind. They cannot think for themselves. They cannot see reality, so they need their proof demonstrated to them by torturing defenseless creatures(p.206)." The entire book consists of this type of emotionally charged but scientifically unsound propaganda.
It's a shame, because I really believe that eating a raw food diet is one of the most healing things you can do for your body. But this book doesn't focus on the positive aspects of eating raw fruits and vegetables nearly as much as it does with statements like "dead, cooked corpses are the sources of unnatural diseases (p.19)."
1 Comment 44 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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The Raw Food Diet. It's a very controversial diet. Why? David Wolfe, Stephen Arlin, and the other Nature's First Law guys.
God's diet shouldn't be controversial. I agree with what the authors are saying, but they say it in a way that makes you dislike them. Drilling the message into your head like a drill sergeant that "Cooked Food is Poison" might do it for some, but not for me. To me, these guys approach raw foodism as if it's a cult following. Kind of like, "Hey, jump on OUR bandwagon and live right. Everyone else is living wrong." They poke fun at every single diet on the planet, even vegans, who don't even eat animal products.
The abrasive way they deliver their message is unique, but it didn't do it for me. Give me scientific data, not catch phrases and slogans. Give me SOME science at all, not what is 'believed' to be the truth. Do raw foods energize? No doubt they do. Is everyone who eats processed, devitalized foods poisoning themselves? Yes, they are. But are the ones who eat wholesome nutritious foods, mostly vegan, poisoning themselves? No. Poison is a harsh word. Raw foodists can "poison" themselves even worse by overeating on sweet fruit, nuts, seeds, and aggravating a vata condition with the dieuretic action of the sweet fruits. This isn't mentioned in this rah-rah book.
All in all, not a very good intro to raw foodism. This diet is not a cult. It's a healthy way of life, but you must know how to do it properly. For this, I recommend "Conscious Eating" by Gabriel Cousens.
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By A Customer on April 1, 2003
Format: Paperback
Could this book be anymore poorly written?! It is basically a collection of the author's passionate opinions. There are no facts or even decent arguements for their views. Throughout the entire book they tell you what they believe and that they are right, no doubt about it. It is so sad that they wasted so much time and energy writing this horrible book. The saddest part is that it has potentially good information in it, but the authors' writing styles ruin it.
While reading the book I kept asking myself. "Hmm, are these guys really horrible authors or is this what happens to your brain when you start eating a raw diet?"
Please, don't waste your money!!!
1 Comment 26 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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Format: Paperback
I was already on a 100% raw food diet, and this book was almost offensive enough to convince me to go back to cooked food. Maybe some people find "cooked food is poison" repeated approximately 50 times to be a satisfactory argument, but I consider it to be wasted space in which they could have cited the actual science behind raw foodism. Instead, the authors' apparent science phobia leads them to such nonsensical reasoning as "no scientists have proven that viruses are alive, therefore they probably don't exist." (In case readers don't understand why this is nonsense, I'll cite an example: I have a computer in front of me. It has not been proven to be alive. Does it exist?) I sincerely hope that these authors consider taking an elementary science course (perhaps biology or chemistry) before writing their next book. They have a wonderful message, but books like this are the reason many people consider raw foodists to be maniacal zealots.
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