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Negotiating Arab-Israeli Peace: Patterns, Problems, Possibilities

4.0 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0253211590
ISBN-10: 025321159X
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Editorial Reviews

Review

"The new edition includes a 38-page bibliography and 125 related documents available online and coordinated with the text.... Recommended." ―Choice



"In separating the Arab-Israeli from the Palestinian-Israeli conflict, this second edition clarifies important differences in their nature, dyanmics, and degrees of intractability." ―Christina W. Michelmore, Chatham University



"One of the best presentations of how the Middle East not only can be but should be approached from a theoretical perspective." ―Glenn Palmer, Penn State University



"As with the first edition, the second edition of Negotiating Arab-Israeli Peace is extremely well-written. It covers the latest significant details in the negotiations and will be very useful as a resource for researchers and students alike." ―Rex Brynen, McGill University



"Nothing in my library comes close to Eisenberg and Caplan's unique and balanced treatment of the peace process. Their book is more essential today than when it was first published and contains many lessons that the parties could still benefit from." ―Philip Mattar, editor-in-chief of the Encyclopedia of the Modern Middle East and North Africa



In this second edition, Eisenberg (history, Carnegie Mellon Univ.) and Caplan (history, Concordia Univ., Canada) begin (as in the first edition) with an account of early-19th-century Arab-Jewish negotiations. They end with President Obama's belief that his vision of Middle Eastern peace is compatible with Muslim concerns and interests. The history of these peace efforts, they claim, reveals seven reoccurring areas of diplomatic difficulty, such as previous experience in negotiating, psychological factors affecting leaders and followers, and the role of third-party involvement. Several peace efforts, beginning with the Camp David Accords between Israel and Egypt in 1978 through the 1993 Oslo Accords, are examined in detail by considering these seven areas of difficulty. The authors assert that past peace negotiations failed to take into account one or more of the seven characteristics. Original chapters were updated and reflect new information and scholarship since the first edition 12 years ago. The new edition includes a 38-page bibliography and 125 related documents available online and coordinated with the text. A series of illustrative political cartoons is integrated throughout the text. Summing Up: Recommended. General readers, undergraduate students, graduate students, and research faculty. -- ChoiceD. Peretz, emeritus, SUNY at Binghamton, February 2011

--This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

Review

"In an innovative study, two historians of the Arab-Israeli conflict reflect on what their craft can contribute to peacemaking." ―Middle East Quarterly, reviewing a previous edition or volume



"A highly useful text for the study of the Arab-Israel conflict." ―Jewish Book World / Jewish Book Council, reviewing a previous edition or volume



"The book is well written, without the usual political science jargon characteristic of books on similar topics. It is well researched and well documented with clear and useful maps." ―Journal of Third World Studies, reviewing a previous edition or volume



"For an introductory course, the text does a commendable job of presenting the cases and providing an interpretive framework." ―Middle East Journal, reviewing a previous edition or volume

--This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.
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Product Details

  • Series: Indiana Series in Middle East Studies
  • Paperback: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Indiana University Press (March 1, 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 025321159X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0253211590
  • Product Dimensions: 6.2 x 0.8 x 9.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #8,025,842 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Touching first with a brief mention of the attempts of Zionists to make an accord with early Arab Nationalists to plan the future of Palestine, (the Arab Decentralization Party in Cairo and Beirut circa 1913/14), the book skims over talks with in the 1930s with the likes of Omar al-Barghuti and Musa Alami then jumps to the Sadat/Begin agreement of 1979. Chapter 2 provides a quick overview of the factions at play during Lebanon's civil war including American naivité over Syrian involvement.

With Jordan the authors note a combination of factors. For one, informal non-public discussions had gone on for years. Another was that Jordan had supported Saddam Hussein in the lead up to Gulf War I, which lead not only to a drop in US aid, but a severe economic depression (ref: Troubles on the East Bank: Challenges to the Domestic Stability of Jordan ) due to the return of large numbers of Jordanian/Palestinian workers ejected from the Gulf States and unable to send money home. Reaching an agreement repositioned the Kingdom wrt America, and unloaded the political and financial problems of supporting the west bank.

Syria was different. Consider the diplomatic visits of 2 US Presidents and over 30 trips by US Secretary Warren Christoper to Damascus. The long winded meetings, jokingly referred to as "bladder diplomacy" wound up leading nowhere. (Add the pilgrimages by Nancy Pelosi and John Kerry during the early Obama administration.) Both Americans and Israeli negotiators hoped progress here might lead to a spillover effect in other areas.
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Format: Paperback
I actually took Laura Eisenbergs class in college and i'd like to say that this book is very well balanced. I came to her class being VERY pro Palestinian. This book really can open up your eyes to the other side's point of view. I found it to be very objectively written & it contains a TON of primary sources that are very relivent to the conflict today. I think that anyone who wants to get a balanced view of the conflicts should definately read this book. I can't tell you how much it is going to open your eyes!
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Format: Paperback
In an innovative study, two historians of the Arab-Israeli conflict reflect on what their craft can contribute to peacemaking. They reach the depressing conclusion that the tried and true ways lead to failure, and that "the more closely negotiations follow the old patterns, the less likely they are to succeed. Hopes for resolution of this conflict rest on deviating from those patterns."
More specifically, Eisenberg and Caplan find six considerations important to success: the parties' motives, timing, high-status negotiating partners, minimal third-party involvement, reasonably similar terms of agreement, and the absence of psychological obstacles. Some of these factors are commonsensical, other more subtle; in all, it is good to see them assayed in the balance of historical experience.
Just one error in judgment mars an otherwise sound analysis, namely the authors' tendency toward moral equivalency, implying that the democratic state of Israel is no better or worse that the terrorist organization led by Yasir Arafat or the totalitarian regime headed by Hafiz al-Asad. For example, in one passage, the authors hold that "both Arab and Israeli leaders" struggled with extremist wings of their constituencies-making it seem as though West Bank settlers were the counterpart of Saddam Husayn.
Middle East Quarterly, September 1998
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