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Showing 1-10 of 16 reviews(Verified Purchases). See all 25 reviews
on September 12, 2015
I bought the paper back one and Amazon gives me the free Kindle version of the book. Love it!

About the book, I love it. Easy to digest language. They also have stories to illustrate different concepts/phenomenon so it is very enjoyable to read. A good starting point to understand networked society, its history and development.
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on January 13, 2013
I got myself Networked by Lee Rainie and Barry Wellman as a sort of Christmas present based on its good reviews on Amazon. I expected it would be a comprehensive, informational book about contemporary social structures how consumer ICTs influence them. Having read it, I can say I wasn't disappointed, even though the content turned out to be slightly different than what I had expected.

The authors explore how the shift in the structure of society from groups toward networks has been affecting how people form and maintain relationships, and how the rise of modern technologies (internet, mobile devices) comes into play.

In the first part of the book, you'll find a short analysis of each of the "revolutions", as the authors call them - the network revolution, the internet revolution, and the mobile revolution. Each chapter of the second part then elaborates in more detail on how these factors influence a specific area of our everyday life (family life, work, contact with friends, etc.). In the last part, the authors imagine two rather sci-fi scenarios of possible future development, an optimistic one and a dystopian one, and analyze which way we might be heading.

Most of the text refers to various surveys conducted by Pew Internet and several other similar groups, and the authors present quite a lot of data to support their analysis. The research data are generally from the US and Canada, but the conclusions are often applicable to similarly developed countries. I would personally prefer slightly less statistics in favor of a little more analytical commentary, as I sometimes found the text a little too descriptive, but the amount of research is digestible and if you're a fact-oriented reader, you may actually find it to be one of the book's strong points.

Although the writing style is a little academic, and may not suit everybody, the book reads very well and anyone with a slightly serious interest in the subject should find the book pretty informative. I think it could serve as a good starting point for anyone trying to get oriented in this area.

I find worth mentioning that the text is well balanced and does not tend to be overly enthusiastic about the current trends, nor is the commentary on them unnecessarily pessimistic or negative.

Despite my general praise, not everyone will find Rainie and Wellman's work so enlightening, as you might actually be looking for something different. It's not a how-to guide on social networking and use of social media (although some general hints are given), neither is it a business book about social media and their dynamics (although the use of social networking sites is definitely not ignored).

Finally, this book is not "modern ICTs and society for dummies". Although it is well written and generally accessible, without a certain level of general education, ability to read academic text, and a tiny bit of background knowledge of modern ICTs, you'd better look elsewhere for a simpler introductory text. If, however, you do meet the mentioned prerequisites and you are a little curious, this may be a really good book to start with.
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on September 23, 2012
These two towering intellects collaborate to give readers a fresh perspective on what is happening all around us. Rainie and Wellman have been studying human communication for decades, so they have the context to perceive change better than most researchers. Their characterization of the Triple Revolutions of social networks, the Internet, and mobile connectedness reveals that networked individualism is the trend to watch. The central message is the increasing capacity of individuals to act independently with great impact. The potent anecdotes and solid data make for a convincing presentation, but in the final chapter on "The Future of Networked Individualism" the authors unleash their imagination by suggesting compelling possibilities and troubling dangers.
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on February 18, 2013
Introduces eye opening ideas, stays on message and supports message with extremely well done statistics and research. a good read. Good for those who are on the front end of adopting the new media that is defining our world or those who are lagging behind.

One small critique would be that at some point it feels like it does plow the same field over and again - thus failing to follow its own warnings about too much information. They make their point then make it again, both times with lots of evidence and solid theories.
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on July 23, 2015
Excellent boom, affording new understanding of social networks.
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on June 15, 2013
Makes one aware of how communication and contacts have changed from being vertical to being in the form of a web.
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on August 24, 2015
The book was interesting. The only reason I gave this 3 stars is because it wasn't organized very clearly as an ebook. The table of contents wasn't organized clearly and there weren't any page numbers. I often had to write papers for class and citing the book was difficult without the page numbers. Overall it was fine. As you can see from my picture, the table of contents lists major headings but it doesn't link you to specific chapters. That could be annoying, but I used bookmarks and the search tool.
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on August 7, 2012
This is an outstanding book on the topic of networking based on recent and current research on the topic with a particular emphasis on the role of information technology today and into the future. Although the authors draw on the academic literature in this field which they both know well, they have managed to produce a book that is both readable and understandable by the general public. Moreover, they successfully present a balanced picture of the role and impact of information technology in our lives and inspire critical thinking about both the positive and negative implications of such technology for the future. I recommend it highly for anyone who is interested in understanding the role of information technology today and in the future.
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on July 3, 2016
I feel that the authors oversimplified their points into an easily-digestible sociological coffee table book that becomes shallow and doesn't give enough information to support conclusions.
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on April 15, 2016
best book ever
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