Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

The New Deadwardians Paperback – February 12, 2013

4.8 out of 5 stars 12 customer reviews

See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$8.99 $0.02
Comic
"Please retry"
$4.98

Read "The Killing Joke" and related graphic novels
Batman: The Killing Joke
Batman Vol. 3
Batgirl Vol. 1
click to open popover

Editorial Reviews

Review

“The post-Victorian British drama of Downton Abbey has proven popular among Americans. So just imagine the aristocratic intrigue if you tossed vampires and zombies into the mix.”—USA Today
 
“Unique and highly enjoyable, "The New Deadwardians'" fresh take on vampires and zombies will make you rethink all you thought you knew.”—Comic Book Resources
 
“I can safely say that it is not only the best new Vertigo book, but quite possibly the best series of the year. Everything about it is near perfection.”—IGN
 
“This is a beautiful book and one that you, all of you, should be buying and reading.”—IGN
 

 

About the Author

Dan Abnett lives and works in Maidstone, Kent. After graduating from Oxford, he worked for a while as an editor of comics and children's books before turning to writing full time. In the dozen or so years since then, he has written for such a diverse range of characters--including Scooby Doo, Thunderbirds, Conan the Barbarian, The X-Men, Johnny Bravo, Batman, Rupert the Bear, Dr Who, Mr. Men, The Terminator and Postman Pat--that he is now clinically bewildered. He created the popular series Sinister Dexter, which he continues to write, along with other strips, for 2000 AD, and has recently helped rejuvenate RESURRECTION MAN for DC Comics.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

The latest book club pick from Oprah
"The Underground Railroad" by Colson Whitehead is a magnificent novel chronicling a young slave's adventures as she makes a desperate bid for freedom in the antebellum South. See more

Product Details

  • Series: The New Deadwardians
  • Paperback: 176 pages
  • Publisher: Vertigo; Reissue edition (February 12, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1401237630
  • ISBN-13: 978-1401237639
  • Product Dimensions: 6.6 x 0.2 x 10.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #536,603 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Tyler Johnson on February 14, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Vampires and Zombies have become well tread ground in modern entertainment, and comics are no different. From "The Walking Dead: Compendium One" to "I, Vampire Vol. 1: Tainted Love (The New 52)", there are plenty of excellent tales of the undead. What separates "The New Deadwardians" from the pack is how startlingly human the tale it tells truly is.

The world of "The New Deadwardians" is set in Post-Victorian England. The dead now walk the earth and consume the living, as they are want to do. To combat the threat of the restless, the zombies, the royal army takes "the cure" which turns them into vampires. Because the young, what the vampires are called because of their eternal life, are dead, the restless, who feed on life, pay them no attention. The story picks up after the war. The affluent of society, mostly consisting of the young, live in Zone A, while all the rest of society is cordoned off in Zone B.

The central character of "The New Deadwardians" is Chief Inspector George Suttle. George is of the Young, and the only remaining member of the Zone A murder squad, because that which does not live cannot be killed; right? It is this question that becomes the central theme for the story. In his hunt for the truth, George not only uncovers a shocking secret about the empire, he also learns more about himself, and his humanity, which he had believed long gone.

The strongest aspect of "The New Deadwardians" is the writing, and how effective a narrator George Suttle turns out to be.
Read more ›
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
England in the early 20th century is a slightly different place to the Edwardian era we knew – most of the upper classes have taken “the cure” and become vampires while most of the lower classes are zombies, kept out of major cities like London by massive walls. In a world populated with the dead and undying, Chief Inspector George Suttle is faced with the bizarre homicide case of a young aristocrat – but who can kill the “Young”, as the vampires are known, and why?

I’m going to talk about some details that bothered me later in the review so if you don’t want to read spoilers because you’re thinking of reading it and you just want a yay or nay, my takeaway of The New Deadwardians is that it’s not a bad murder mystery which has some excellent art but is a bit overlong and a bit thin, plot-wise. If you enjoy supernatural police procedurals, it’s not bad and the set-up is certainly different, even if the protagonist is more than a bit bland. I didn’t love it but, considering the other titles Vertigo is currently offering, it’s up there as one of the better ones to read.

Ok, so: spoilers.

The set-up isn’t totally correct; there are vampires and there are zombies but there are also humans. Quite a few, in fact - they’re called the “Bright”. I really like Dan Abnett’s labelling of the different types of people in this world, “the Young”, “the Bright”, “the cure” – they feel like titles that perfectly belong to the post-Victorian era.

But much is made of Suttle being a redundant figure – a homicide detective in a world where homicides are so rare that he’s the last cop in that department. This makes sense if there are just zombies and vampires – but humans also exist. Humans can die.
Read more ›
1 Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I'm pretty tired of vampires, both literally and culturally, but this book is worth the risk.

This book is beautifully colored, well-drawn, and consistently clever.

One of the best comics of recent memory, subtly satirical and not so subtle at times.

References first-wave feminism, the inequalities of industrialism, British imperialism...
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is a crime mystery NOT a zombie/vampire comic. I loved the unique take on how the zombies and vampires came to be but don't buy this thinking it's some kind of monster mash up. It's a really good, moderately paced murder mystery with a Downton Abbey feel.
1 Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition
There is little room in the modern comic horror section for another Zombie or Vampire title. In fact, there is little room anywhere in literature for the revisiting of such tropes. It seems that everything that needs to be said has been said over and over again with both high and low marks. Why any author of any genre would want to write on a such an over saturated subject matter, one where there is little to no innovation left, is beyond me.

But then again, I am not Dan Abnett.

In The New Deadwardians Dan Abnett goes for the two-fer a Zombie/Vampire tale and the results are superb. He finds innovation in this area by focusing on an alternate timeline in England circa 1910. It is 50 years since the world wide rising of the Restless Curse and the plague inflicting bites of these cursed very nearly wiped out humanity during the Memorial War. England determined that the only way to combat the dead was to be dead. So the upperclass officers took the cure to become a form of dead themselves...vampires. Because they too are undead the Restless pay them no mind allowing the Young as they are now called to turn the tide of the war. Now in a rigid social system the Young have occupied Sector A, the Brights (or non effected) other zones, and beyond these fences roam the millions of Restless.

Within Zone A Chief Inspector George Scuttle has the most boring job in London. He is the Chief Inspector of Murder for a sector of London where the occupants are all but Immortal. But when he is faced with the murder of a Young absent of the usual methods (impalement of the heart, decapitation, incineration) his investigation will take him deep into a conspiracy that will redefine his very jaded beliefs.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews