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The New Testament: 1526 Tyndale Bible, Original Spelling Edition Hardcover – August 1, 2000

4.8 out of 5 stars 21 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 576 pages
  • Publisher: The British Library (August 1, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0712346643
  • ISBN-13: 978-0712346641
  • Product Dimensions: 4 x 1 x 6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (21 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,089,066 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
This is the British Library edition of the William Tyndale New Testament of 1526, original spelling Worms edition, in small but easy to read modern type. This older freer form of spelling takes a little to get used to but is worth it. The English is clear, often clearer than the authorized version, although similar since the AV is essentially a revision of Tyndale. The volume is small and easy to carry around, much as was the intent of the volume of nearly 500 years ago. It contains no notes or cross references, it has chapter headings. There is no verse numbering, since these did not appear in English for the first time until the 1558 Geneva New Testament. It has a brief preface by Tyndale's biographer David Daniell, and a helpful historical introduction by the editor W. R. Cooper.
These men have done a great service to the modern English reader in increasing the accessibility of William Tyndale's works.
Not only is this an important book to own for historical reasons, it also is useful for the message it contains: the life changing Gospel of Jesus Christ.
"For yf when we were enemys, we were reconciled to God by the deeth of hys sonne: moche more, seynge we are reconciled, we shalbe preservyd by his life. Not only so, but we also ioye in God by the meanes off oure lorde Jesus Christ, by whom we have receavyd this attonment," Romayns v.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This wee 12-mo of the 1526 Tyndale New Testament from the press of the British Library is the closest most will come to the genesis of the English-speaking bible which was to appear 85 years later in the guise of the familiar King James Version of 1611.

The prefacist, David Daniell, is known for his modern language version published by Yale University Press, but this is the original Tyndale-spelling edition for us purists. The introducer, W R Cooper of Oxford, employs his eight pages so profitably as to leave the reader edified and stocked with a trove of bibliophilic lore and conversation from the dawn of the Reformation.

Here begins the second chapter of Matthew:

"When Jesus was borne in Bethleem a toune of Jury, in the tyme of kynge Herode. Beholde, there cam wyse men from the est to Jerusalem saynge: where is he that is borne kynge of the Jues? we have sene his star in the est, and are come to worship hym. Herode the kynge, after he hadd herde thys, was troubled, and all Jerusalem with hym..."

This is the English language in the swaddling clothes of its very infancy. Its rustic power thrills us, even unto these very days...
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
In republishing an ancient document, one has several options:
* Facsimile
* Trascription
* Transliteration
* Translation

So important is the Tyndale New Testament and its seminal effect on the modern English language, that the 1526 is now available in all four formats. Henrickson has published the facsimile but this is difficult to read beacuse of the black letter font. This "Original Spelling" edition provides a transcription using Roman font which preserves the original book size, spelling and grammar, without verse numbers (as original). Some aspects will appear odd to modern readers but they take very little time to become used to. The word "ask" is consistently spelled "axe"; "U"s and "V"s are usedinterchangeably, Jesus is spelled at least four different ways, etc. If one reads phonetically, it is clear that English in 1526 was spoken with what might now be taken for a slight Scottish accent. Despite this, the text is suprisingly readable! I am astonished how much of the phraseology is preserved in the King James and modern versions. (The English, apart from the alien spelling is, if anything, more modern than the King James Version because the KJV translators wanted a more "majestic" sound and used rather old English, even in 1611.)

Tyndale had a profound effect on the development of English and all subsequent translations. The style is consistently forceful and direct - no wonder it was an instant success. I enjoy this book for its its historic value but even more for the pleasure it gives me to read it.

The 600 original printed copies had to be smuggled into England (from Germany) and were rapidly bought up the official church.
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Format: Hardcover
The worst thing that ever happened to the Bible was division into chapter and verse notation. When that happened it ceased to be so much a holy book as it became a law book. Prior to such notation one had to read the scriptures as a whole. One had to absorb the Spirit of the whole, instead of using a pick-and-choose study approach of those specific lines (usually taken out of context) that supported one's specific agenda. Indeed, text and verse division did not come into being until the 16th century- long after the end of high point of traditional Christiandom and the start of the age of the profane. The Tyndale is a wholistic work uncorrupted by artificial text and verse division. No doubt this was why the ruling class of the day considered it to be so dangerous.
Tyndale translated this work, alone, from the original Greek. This is not the work of a committee with an ax to grind. Actually, this is the translation that all English Bibles, including the King James, was based on until the 20th century. It seems no one else even attempted to translate the whole book from scratch into English from Greek until the modern age. Unless you can read Koine Greek yourself, it is still the best alternative.
I have heard various experts state that the King James version "eliminated" biases in the Tyndale. Nothing could be farther from the truth. The King James is in fact an edited and censored version of the Tyndale. If there was intensional bias involved it was in the minds of the rich and powerful who had Tyndale and his Bible consigned to the flames- and replaced with a "politically correct" substitute.
Tyndale's sole purpose was to get the undistorted, uncorrupted, word of God, as best he knew it, to the English people. He gave his life for that purpose. I prefer to trust his version for this reason.
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