Night and Day Kindle Edition

4.0 out of 5 stars 293 customer reviews
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Product Details

  • File Size: 1047 KB
  • Print Length: 265 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 1481846841
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
  • Publication Date: May 12, 2012
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0082RH376
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #779,334 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Woolf portrays the fascinations of self-discovery through relationships with other people, and she also looks into the intricacies of love--are we aware of love? What is the importance of love in a person's life? Does one need it to be happy? Taking a peek into the answers of these questions along with adding delightful humor that made me laugh out loud made this book terrific. The characters are interesting and you can choose for yourself whether or not you like them. I would definitely recommend this book--its many levels are enjoyable for all ages and both sexes!
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Format: Paperback
Here is an artist at work, painting the nuances of the heart, creating living people, reacting to the subtleties of mood, ambiance, the weather, and external perceptions that make up how we live and who we are. No matter what you think of these people, you have a chance to live with them and understand them, feel their conflicts, their love, and their pains. Virginia Woolf is the ballast that offsets all the one-book-wonder authors, the cynics, the nasty moderns, and those authors who have given up on anything positive in the world. Like Shakespeare, her work will live on long after so many others are forgotten. That's because she offers us art, hope, vision, and the truth about our humanity. It's all here in this book, if you choose to read it.
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By A Customer on October 23, 2003
Format: Paperback
As in the other Virginia Woolf books I have read, what strikes me first and foremost is the wonderful writing. The descriptions are phenomenal, starting with the surroundings and continuing with the character's facial expressions. Some of the passages are pure poetry and the characters are beautifully and consistently drawn out. Oddly, although we know that Katharine is beautiful, we do not get a description of her, or of any other person in the story, with the exception of William Rodney.
Woolf became a little heavy when it went into the minds of the characters who are in crises, but as one reaches the end of the book, all is forgiven.
An excellent read!
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By A Customer on December 23, 1999
Format: Paperback
Virginia Woolf does such a wonderful job of revealing the many facets of an individual. In this book, she applies that task to couples in love. It is a marvel that she not only identifies the many nuances of a glance, a word, a movement, but that she also conveys them to the reader in a perfect sentence. This book, unlike some of her others, seems written to appeal to a broader audience. It is "easier" than some of her other fiction, but is by no means a bore for Woolf fans.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Adeline Stephen aka Virginia Woolf holds her place and remains a puzzling enigma to most of her readers. Born in 1883, she was far in advance of most of her contemporary female authors. Her life was troubled after she lost her mother, then her father, at a young age. She married Leonard Woolf, a kindred spirit, in 1912. In 1917, they established the Hogarth Press which published many of Woolf's novels, along with other notables, such as, T.S. Eliot.

Virginia desperately needed a room (space) of her own. But, her fanciful flights and gripping internalization needed to be grounded. Virginia often used stream of consciousness style writing via her characters. She externalized essential dialogues, views, and mindset impressions. She has often been described as a feminist. She struck out mightily against male domination, and the established stereotyped image of grey, quiet mouse type women.

Night and Day was Woolf's second published novel. Again, she exercises her elastic mind using subjects of marriage, non- marriage and emancipated females, as well as, women's suffrage. Decision, composure, contemplation and control were attributes of character, Katharine Hilbery. Most did not suspect that she was keenly observant giving off tiny sparks like an ancient jewel. This novel was Virginia Woolf's chance to explore and utilize her thoughts and emotions. These vivid portrayals were avant-garde for her day. Always on the edge. Some referred to Woolf as "a leprechaun at work." She has proven through her numerous books, and her life, that she was much more.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Virginia Woolf's second novel has none of the daring stylistic innovations that would characterize her later work, and in its barest outline the plot resembles that of a 19th century romance. But Night and Day is very forward-looking in its examination of relationships under the stress of the culture shift was occurring in the early 20th century.

Katharine Hilbery, one of the two central characters, is the strikingly beautiful only child of a wealthy London couple who are immersed in the literary world. Her father publishes a review, and her mother worships the 19th century poets, especially her own father whose biography she is perpetually compiling. But Katharine, entirely unbeknownst to her parents, has no interest in the arts. She secretly studies mathematics and yearns to be an astronomer so she can spend her time with the stars that are as cold and distant and unemotional as she feels herself to be. The law of science appeals to her "because she could find nothing like it in the possession of human lives."

The other central figure is Ralph Denham, a penniless lawyer who lives in a shabby house with his mother and many siblings. Like Katharine he shuns the "damned romantic nonsense" of the past century and takes private refuge in the sciences, only his passion is botany. But he loses control of his passions when he makes Katharine's acquaintance while transacting business with her father.

The story proceeds with the untangling of an awkward chain of romantic and social entanglements. Mary Datchett, a suffragist, loves Ralph Denham. Ralph is secretly infatuated with Katharine Hilbery. Katharine is resignedly engaged to a bad poet, William Rodney, who thinks he loves Katharine until he meets her cousin Cassandra.
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