Amazon.com: Customer Reviews: Nightbreed: The Director's Cut (Limited Edition) [Blu-ray]
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on October 9, 2014
An extended Director’s Cut long coveted by fans, Shout! Factory has made the restored version of Clive Barker’s NIGHTBREED a reality at last. The label’s meticulous reconstruction of the horror auteur’s original version – recklessly cut down and reshot at the insistence of Morgan Creek executives – is cause for celebration for the movie’s admirers, who have long believed that a better, more consistent cinematic vision existed on the cutting room floor.

“Nightbreed” is certainly a bit of a flawed movie even in Barker’s 120-minute new cut, but at least it’s an entertaining and occasionally inspired monster mash, mixed with slasher horror and capped by a love story. If nothing else, the picture is certainly unique, and comes much closer to being a satisfying product in the Director’s Cut.

Barker’s adaptation of his short novel “Cabal” tells the story of Boone (Craig Sheffer), a troubled young man with visions of a nightmarish monster land named “Midian.” His psychiatrist, Decker (played by director David Cronenberg), though, is the real monster in the movie – a serial killer who pins his killings on Boone. With nowhere else to go, Boone finds Midian, a sanctuary for shapeshifters, demons and other creatures of the night, but the group initially rejects him because he’s a mere human. After Decker pursues Boone, though, our hero is killed and resurrected as part of the Nightbreed, leading him to help the cause of the persecuted monster-outsiders and fight back against humans who believe Boone is responsible for the murders.

Morgan Creek didn’t care for Barker’s original cut of “Nightbreed,” which balances horror with a strong love story between Boone and his girlfriend Lori (Anne Bobby), and also focuses heavily on the monster community of Midian. By the time “Nightbreed” reached theaters in the winter of 1990, the movie had been cut down and reshot, shifting much of the focus away from the monsters and towards Cronenberg’s Decker. Apparently thinking Decker’s slasher-villain would be more marketable to the Freddy & Jason-loving masses than the gallery of ghouls living in Midian, Morgan Creek changed the shape and very intent of Barker’s story.

The final product didn’t work and fizzled out at the box-office – yet enough of Barker’s intent seeped through, allowing for “Nightbreed” to generate a cult following. The film’s admirers have, for years, hoped that Barker’s intended cut would see a release – and several years ago, a crudely-packaged “Cabal Cut” surfaced, restoring all kinds of lost scenes off a VHS workprint dub and mixing them together with the theatrical version. The result was reportedly a bloated and unfocused 160-minute cut that needed some trimming – yet it was long thought that the deleted footage was lost in the Morgan Creek archives. The prospects of a genuine restoration appeared bleak, with murmurs floating about that some restored scenes would have to originate from a VHS source, or might be lacking audio and would necessitate subtitles.

All of those early reports, thankfully, were completely inaccurate in so far as to the newly minted Director’s Cut edited by Barker and restoration producer Mark Allan Miller goes. Showing a consistently crisp and healthy image from start to finish, with just a bit of dirt in the added scenes visible once in a while, this new cut of “Nightbreed” is a triumph for all involved. There’s little disparity between the new scenes and material derived from the theatrical version, which was sourced from an interpositive at Warner Bros., which currently distributes the film as part of an arrangement with Morgan Creek (the film was theatrically released by Fox). The 5.1 DTS MA and 2.0 DTS MA stereo mixes are wonderfully handled, offering an active sound design with a glorious Danny Elfman score (more on that in a moment).

Barker opted not to include every last scrap of material here – a wise idea since at the two-hour mark, the running time for “Nightbreed” feels just about right. Barker and Miller removed the reshot Morgan Creek scenes and added some 40 minutes of new/alternate material, resulting in a film that’s 20 minutes longer than its theatrical cut but contains more many alterations than the time disparity alone suggests. In every way, this is a superior version of the picture – the story has time to breathe in its early going, allowing for Boone and Lori’s relationship to more satisfyingly develop. The monsters are also given more focus, and that’s key to this new version of “Nightbreed.” Morgan Creek wanted more of a straight-ahead slasher movie – but Barker’s story was more of a dark fantasy than a pure horror film, and this new ”Nightbreed” is, naturally, much more aligned with what was intended all along.

Not that the movie isn’t without its faults. Barker’s limitations as a director are evident throughout the picture, which – despite having been shot on an expansive set at Pinewood Studios – is claustrophobically staged and executed. There’s no real sense of scale or scope in the movie, with Barker’s style exhibiting a vanilla, “point and shoot” type of approach. The make-up effects are striking and some stop motion animation is utilized at one point, but one can only imagine how much more visually powerful the film may have been in the hands of a veteran director.

Thankfully, Danny Elfman’s music compensates for the movie’s weaker aesthetic elements. For every composer there’s a particularly fruitful era in their filmographies, and for Elfman, there’s little disputing that “Nightbreed” fell during one of the most creative and successful times of his career. His first score written after “Batman” and prior to “Dick Tracy” and “Edward Scissorhands,” Elfman’s “Nightbreed” is, quite simply, one of the most appealing scores in the composer’s oeuvre. Sure, it’s as dark, pulse-pounding and exciting – colored by tribal percussion and chanting choral passages – as you’d expect, but it’s also gorgeous. Otherworldly, melodic and surprisingly romantic, it’s the most polished technical element in the picture (Barker has said as much), and its orchestrations are striking. At times Elfman sustains scenes with an almost Herrmann-like use of strings, while in others, he characterizes the monsters and their plight with a genuinely poignant sensitivity. It all culminates in a lovely ending – one that was unceremoniously dropped from the original theatrical release – and an End Credits track that was likewise trimmed, leaving off the redemptive final notes of the composer’s music that’s, at last, restored here.

Shout’s Blu-Ray/DVD combo pack of the “Nightbreed” Director’s Cut is highlighted by a commentary with Barker and Miller. It’s an engaging track occasionally stymied by a lack of focus, but fans ought to enjoy it just the same. Craig Sheffer, Anne Bobby and members of the supporting cast are on-hand – minus Barker – in a 72-minute new documentary on the film that’s heavy on the actors’ anecdotes about the production, and light on the recutting of the picture (save for a few minutes at the very end). Separate featurettes on the 2nd unit directors and make-up artists were also newly produced for this release, and it’s rounded out with Fox’s brief original theatrical trailer, narrated by Charles Aidman and partially underscored with “Enemy Mine” music.

“Nightbreed” may still be a flawed film, but it’s nevertheless an entertaining, offbeat genre-bending experience that’s stuffed with imaginative elements and a sumptuous Danny Elfman score. Backed by a more satisfying ending and more emotional content throughout, it’s well worth a visit this Halloween season.
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on October 19, 2014
Here's the thing. If you have an attachment to the theatrical then don't bother with this version. The theatrical cut has a lot of fans which I can appreciate because there's quirks to it that separate it from the standard horror pack. As a kid I loved it, thought it was cool.

As I got older and having read the book I just couldn't get on board with it. There were TOO MANY logic gaps in the story to make it even remotely satisfying. Boone and Lori as characters were just place holders, ciphers who loved each other without any meaningful motivation to get us as the audience invested into their plight. Just a wretched truncated story designed to make a quick buck. Having read the behind scenes drama with the studio demanding cuts now I know why the theatrical version has as many problems as it does.

All the problems I had originally have been effectively rectified in this new cut. Like the book, at its deep heart, it's a love story mingled with a classic hero's journey messiah myth. Is it still cheesy in some spots, hell yeah, but it wears its heart on its sleeve with pride and gusto, I'll take that over cynical cash grabs any day over the week.

Boone and Lori are now at the forefront in this cut which in turn makes the investment into the story more exciting. The stakes have been raised exponentially. There's more personality to the proceedings this time that gives it a much more distinctive identity than it had before. To me for what was once a cult guilty pleasure has now effectively become one of my favorite movies of all time. I wouldn't be surprised if they start releasing this cut during midnight screenings or festivals or even at the Alamo Drafthouse, getting a new lease on life with cinema critics and enthusiasts.

I can go on and on and on about how friggin' cool this movie has become in its current form, but all I can do right now is just pass the word. If you're into Clive Barker, see this cut. See this movie if you love horror. If you love fantasy. If you love allegories about society persecuting the different. If you love well told stories that don't waste your time and emotional investment. Then see this movie. You will not be disappointed.
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on August 18, 2014
(updated 9/22/14)

After 20+ years the myth becomes real.

Clive thought all was lost, we all did. Morgan Creek had ordered extensive reshoots and 45min excised from Clive Barker's epic adaptation of the Novella "Cabal" and after years of searching, we'd all given up on the film elements with the cut footage ever being found, or existing at all.

Then a few years ago 2 VHS work prints where discovered, with the missing footage (grainy, washed and dismal but there) and a few brave souls re spliced the footage to match the screenplay, re-dubbed Doug Bradely's dialogue (it's his image and voice actors voice in the theatrical cut) and went on tour screening "The CABAL cut"

Then, finally, last year Scream Factory announced they would restore the VHS as best they could and give a delux blu-ray. This year, the did one better, they announced that they found 600 boxes of negatives and prints and with Clive Barker's direction reconstructed and fully restored his original vision. Thus, "Nightbreed: The Directors Cut"

One of the most sought after restorations in history of cinema, and fully unprecedented release, Nightbreed The Directors cut is must own for any horror / fantasy fan.

The story in brief, follows Boone, a troubled young man who's convinced by his doctor that he's been murdering families. after being injured in drug induced state he meets Narcissist, how he convinces to tell him about a place called Midian, a place where the monsters go, where all your sins are forgiven. Boone flees, but he's pursued both by his girlfriend, Lori (easily the most dedicated lover since Juliet) and Dr. Decker (the real killer).

In Midian, Boone finds more than he imagined, after a run-in with some locals, he's transformed, beyond death, he becomes both the cause of there destruction and possibly their savior.

Nightbreed is unlike anything you've ever scene. There's a unique twist of Barker's combination of Horror and Fantasy, the movie tells a tale of persecution, the monsters are not "good guys" but they are not evil either. Echoing the violence of racial and sexual bigotry and hatred, "the sons of the free" converge on Midian and havoc breaks loose. In the center is a serial killer who wants them wiped from the planet, and Lori, willing to go to her death and beyond to be with Boone.

It's not for everyone. Nightreed was fairly low-budget, now sports a running time pushing 3hrs (the final cut excised 20 min from the theatrical and replaced with 40 min of new footage bringing it to just over 2hrs, no plans to include or release the longer Cabal Cut are forthcoming) and is a violent and explicit tale. That said, Barker weaves a world unlike any other and this may be the best cinematic expression of his world-building and epic story-telling skills. If you dare, come take a journey with the dead of night.
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on July 8, 2014
(updated 10/17/14)

I have the disk in hand and have viewed both versions and all the extras:
Disk 1 Theatrical Cut. This is from the film inter-positive, not the negative, the result is grainy and sometimes murky looking, but over-all leaps above the DVD and easily the finest presentation the film has ever had. Nothing has been done to this, it's just the producers cut as seen on film, vhs and dvd these past 24 years. DTS 2.1 stereo mix is all it comes with, no extras, commentary, etc.

Disk 2, The Directors Cut. This is 40 min shorter than the Cabal Cut, for a few reasons. The Cabal Cut contained nearly the entire Theatrical release plus ALL the scenes they could find that didn't duplicate events. Clive excised 20 min from the theatrical (about 10 of that is the ending) and added 40 min back. The result is 120 min, and still does not contain some of the scenes many of us thought it would, but does contain footage not in the Cabal cut because it was not in the work print.

Most of the new footage is in the beginning and end, added back are some moments between Boone and Decker that explain Boones not been in therapy for four months, it shows Boone slowing getting worse and worse on the drugs Decker gives him, and stopping at the club Lori is singing at (she sings "johnny get angry" in it's entirety" the last 15 min is nearly all new, and the at least one character gets a fate not ever seen in any version.

The new sound mix is awesome, 5.1 DTS Master. unfortunately the score had to be recycled for scenes and that doesn't always work so well if you have seen the film as many times as I have and know the score as well.

The picture quality varies, though color corrected some scratches early on are visible. The new 40 min is from the original negatives and LOOKS BETTER BY FAR than the 80 mins left from the theatrical that are from the Inter-positive elements. Seems odd, they found the missing negatives but not the ones used for the Theatrical cut?

What's odd is what's missing. The love scene between Suna Sashi and Peloquin is partly in the extras, and actually discussed in detail in the documentary, but not in the final cut? I don't know if this was the love scene Clive has mentioned cutting out, or if the jail cell sex-scene in the book, but neither are here. The scenes of Decker talking to the button-eye mask are also not included, but two deleted scenes show that they didn't work on film, so while missed, it's better that way.

Over-all the Directors cut does not offer quite the epic Clive talked about or nearly all the scenes in the Cabal cut. Most of Decker's scenes are here, including some you might think must have been from the producer ordered re-shoots, but they work regardless and I'm happy they are still there. What this cut mostly offers are two things, a better sense of story and pacing, plot holes filled and characters fleshed and a better, more satisfying ending that mostly matches the novel. Also notable is the return of Doug Bradly's voice, not the silly, fake accent German overdub. Though it seems to return for one line at the end... Rachel's voice also seems to be overdubbed for the theatrical scenes and the actress's voice for the new scenes (guess they couldn't get her to come re-record her lines) it's minimal, but noticeable.

The extras are extensive, but don't expect all the deleted scenes, for reasons unknown they are not here. only about 15 min worth (it says 20 but the theatrical ending is pointless included, especially since it's on the theatrical disk!) Some of the VHS footage is here, but not much, the certainly didn't include all the cut scenes -- and considering the nature of the crowd work that went into this, not including every scene on an $80 set is disappointing. The documentaries are very thorough and even a little longer than they need to be sometimes. There's ample commentary tracks to wade through, easily 10+ hrs to watch every last thing here.

The packaging is heavy duty, not a cheap slip cover, the booklet is a nice, well printed touch. There's a new intro by Clive but not the original VHS intro (big drop of the ball there.)

Now, my original review, the story behind this thing.

After 20+ years the myth becomes real.

Clive thought all was lost, we all did. Morgan Creek had ordered extensive reshoots and 45min excised from Clive Barker's epic adaptation of the Novella "Cabal" and after years of searching, we'd all given up on the film elements with the cut footage ever being found, or existing at all.

Then a few years ago 2 VHS work prints where discovered, with the missing footage (grainy, washed and dismal but there) and a few brave souls re spliced the footage to match the screenplay, re-dubbed Doug Bradely's dialogue (it's his image and voice actors voice in the theatrical cut) and went on tour screening "The CABAL cut"

Then, finally, last year Scream Factory announced they would restore the VHS as best they could and give a delux blu-ray. This year, the did one better, they announced that they found 600 boxes of negatives and prints and with Clive Barker's direction reconstructed and fully restored his original vision. Thus, "Nightbreed: The Directors Cut"

One of the most sought after restorations in history of cinema, and fully unprecedented release, Nightbreed The Directors cut is must own for any horror / fantasy fan.

The story in brief, follows Boone, a troubled young man who's convinced by his doctor that he's been murdering families. after being injured in drug induced state he meets Narcissist, how he convinces to tell him about a place called Midian, a place where the monsters go, where all your sins are forgiven. Boone flees, but he's pursued both by his girlfriend, Lori (easily the most dedicated lover since Juliet) and Dr. Decker (the real killer).

In Midian, Boone finds more than he imagined, after a run-in with some locals, he's transformed, beyond death, he becomes both the cause of there destruction and possibly their savior.

Nightbreed is unlike anything you've ever scene. There's a unique twist of Barker's combination of Horror and Fantasy, the movie tells a tale of persecution, the monsters are not "good guys" but they are not evil either. Echoing the violence of racial and sexual bigotry and hatred, "the sons of the free" converge on Midian and havoc breaks loose. In the center is a serial killer who wants them wiped from the planet, and Lori, willing to go to her death and beyond to be with Boone.

It's not for everyone. Nightreed was fairly low-budget, now sports a running time pushing 3hrs (turns out Clive chose to excise 20+ min from the theatrical cut, and added 40 min new footage, bringing this to just over 2hrs. There are no plans for the 2hr 45 min Cabal cut)and is a violent and explicit tale. That said, Barker weaves a world unlike any other and this may be the best cinematic expression of his world-building and epic story-telling skills. If you dare, come take a journey with the dead of night.

If all you want is the film on blu-ray plus DVD with no extras disk or theatrical cut, there's a $20 - range version for mass release available.
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on August 3, 2014
I concur that $72 seems a pretty steep price for one film. But let's consider the context: A small company, Shout Factory, took great pains to locate the cuts that were left out of the theatrical release (over 600 boxes worth), restored it to their best ability, even going so far as to re-dub actor parts. Keep in mind that even Clive himself was convinced that it was all lost years ago. It was all a labor of love, with the ultimate goal of restoring the film to show audiences and fans Clive Barker's original vision for the movie. It's my understanding that with this 3 disc set you get the theatrical release of the film, the director's cut, and a third disc of extras. I'm pretty sure that the third disc of extras does not come with other DVD/Blu Ray combo pack. They made 3 batches of this limited edition: 1st has 1000 copies, 2nd has 3000 copies, and the 3rd brings the grand total to 10,000 copies. Some will get a Shout Factory tote bag and a limited edition poster (while supplies last.) I, for one, am anxious to see what Clive wanted us to see all those years ago. If the price tag is still too high, get the DVD-Blu Ray combo pack. You can't go wrong.
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on November 6, 2014
Written and directed by Clive Barker based on his novel Cabal, Nighbreed follows Aaron Boone (Craig Shaffer), who suffers from re-occuring nightmares. When his psychologist Dr. Decker (David Croenberg) convinces him the nightmares are due to surpressed memories of murders he's commited, Boone winds up in a hospital where crazed patient Narcisse (Hugh Ross)tells him of Midian, a place 'where the monsters go'. Believing Midian might accept a 'monster' like himself, Boone seeks out the fabled city. Soon he's got the police and Decker on his tail, as well as his girlfriend Lori(Anne Bobby), and finds himself in a clash between the Breed and Naturals (humans).
First released in 1990, Barker was never happy with the original version of Nightbreed. Film company Morgan Creek didn't get the original title (Cabal) or concept of monsters as the good guys and demanded cuts to the story, promoting it as a typical slasher. The result was Nightbreed being a failure at the box office, though it later achieved cult status due to home video release and Barker fans.
In 2009, Mark Miller, head of Barker's film production company managed to track down a couple of VHS workprints of Nightbreed. One of these was edited together with a DVD copy of the original release by college film professor Russel Cherrington, forming what came to be known as the 'Cabal Cut' which was shown at various horror conventions. Fan support and demand lead to our current Director's Cut.
All that said, what's different about the director cut vs. the original? Well it's rather hard to tell at times as the film is only 18 minutes longer than it's original 102 minute release. This is because some of the 'new footage' is simply alternate takes, giving story we've seen before from a slighty different perspective. As for the rest, we get much more of Lori and her relationship with Boone. This adds much to the story in terms of explaining why she's even bothering with a guy who obviously has several issues, and we even get a bit of her singing at a nightclub. Decker seems less in the forefront in this version, though he is still a threat. We get a bit more of Captain Eigerman and troubled priest Ashbury. Scattered throughout are more bits with the Breed(Peloquin and Shuna Sassi are lovers, go figure) and there's a different ending. My one question is however, since the 'Cabal Cut' is said to have run 155 minutes, what's in the 35 minutes not in the director's cut? Is it simply alternate or extended material, or are there still scenes the general public hasn't seen?
The extras are informative and entertaining. Fans might be interested to learn some of the actors in the first couple of Hellraiser films show up as Nightbreed. Doug Bradley (Pinhead) is Lylesberg, 'spiritual leader' of the Breed, Nicholas Vince (Chatterer Cenobite) is moon-headed Kinski, and Simon Bamford (Butterball Cenobite) plays Ohnaka, the guy with the chest tattoos and bird necklace.
Overall, good edition, though a bit ticked they didn't offer a version with the director's cut and ALL the extras on DVD rather than only making it available on the 3-disc Blu-ray $70 some dollar version. I for one don't need a disc of the original film, which could have been released seperately. Would have prefered a simple DVD/Blu-ray release with all the extras and leave the original version as a thing to itself. And again, curious what we are missing from the 'Cabal Cut'.
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on December 21, 2014
I've never really been a fan of NIGHTBREED; I always preferred HELLRAISER myself. I guess I never felt like a marginalized group so the WIZARD OF OZ quality it held never appealed to me. Nevertheless, I've always been a fan of restored master edition films and so I bought it blind when the price dropped to $52.

My money was well spent.

For starters, the sleeve is a very sturdy box with a frosted texture surface containing 2 blu-ray cases and a booklet. One case is the 2-disc director's cut and the second is the original theatrical release.

But what is TRULY AMAZING is how incredible the transfer is. The film has been restored by re-integrating the actual film stock that was assumed lost for 20+ years, and because it went untouched for so long, that footage looks as new as the day it was shot. The "lost" footage is in some cases in better shape than the footage that was in the theatrical edition, but the consistency of the image is very close nonetheless: the digital color correction and restoration has made both sets of footage almost identical in terms of quality. Now, the film WAS shot in 1989 so the lighting is softer and more diffused than modern films, but there's no loss of detail in this effect. Grain is surprisingly light and the blacks are quite rich, but then again, the film was lit surprisingly bright, even with the dark scenes.

The special features are a tad off-kilter because the featurettes about the making-of are split between the 2 discs of the director's cut. And sadly, Clive Barker and David Cronenberg aren't interviewed in ANY of them; aside from the video introduction prefacing the director's cut, Barker is absent from this set aside from the audio commentary, and for the life of me, I can't imagine why. NIGHTBREED's director's cut sits up there with the great long-lost studio-mangled films like THE MAGNIFICENT AMBERSONS, LONDON AFTER MIDNIGHT, and NAPOLEON...Barker should be all over this thing chomping at the bit for his victory.

So the set is expensive, but for people looking for the director's cut of their favorite cult film, or for those who want an excellent historical archive edition for their collections (like me), NIGHTBREED is not a disappointment and the price tag is justified for all the stuff it comes with. Now I waited until it reached $52 and you might wanna do the same, but I recommend that you deal with the price now before it becomes a collector's item you have to buy used for $100+.
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on October 15, 2014
Ok, so I have been a massive fan of this movie since I first caught glimpse of the trailer on a VHS of Dolly dearest back in 1990. As a young teenager I found the theatrical cut to an amazing fantasy film and held it in high regard since. As I grew older and learnt some of the mythology about the production and the complications with the studio, This cut had become a thing of legend...it had been said the story was completely different, the motivations of characters, more Breed, more mythology, less random scenes cobbled together..so i went into this Directors cut imagining that those things that didn't really add up in the theatrical would be rectified in Barkers Very own Directors cut...however this was not the case, this cut offers little more than a few deleted scenes at the beginning of the movie, which frankly made it drag and can understand the studios decision in removing them, they offered little more to the story apart from showing us a bit more of Lori and Boone together, Scenes were still not there that I expected or would have liked to have seen...a few extensions but nothing to have me believe this differed too far from the theatrical, it just slowed it down. The major change to this cut, is the Battle of midian is fleshed out but nothing to write home about and some pretty random stuff as well, Boone's character seems to just run around dishing out pieces of Wood to the Breed as if that will do anything against the raging arsenal of the Shearneck police...I expected a difference with Decker also, but apart from the shot with Narcisse demise, I noticed nothing different, and no insight into his motivation either, and to top it off, I found the alternate ending with both Eigerman (it was good to finally find out where he went, in the theatrical he just disappeared) and the ending on the hill to be a bit...lame. I had high hopes for this and found it to be a massive let down, scenes reported as to being shot are still not here and those that have made the cut just didn't add anything new or exciting to the movie...the holy grail of alternate cuts turned out to be just another extended version which had no real benefit to the actual movie as a whole! No doubt fans of Night breed (which I am I might add) will disagree but I just don't think it lives up to anywhere near the hype it has gathered over the years.
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on July 8, 2014
I had the rare privilege to see The Cabal Cut of this movie. Named for the book it's based on, The Cabal Cut was a rough piecing together together of dvd footage from the theatrical version with scenes that were cut or extensions of scenes thought lost. They were found in a box of vhses.

This year is going to be amazing for fans of what have now become cult classic horror films with this remastered and reconstructed bluray of the director's cut of Nightbreed as well as the fabled Halloween 6 Producer's Cut releasing as well. These 2 movies' secret cuts have been whispered about and demanded since the early 90s.

As someone who loves the theatrical Nightbreed I can honestly say Cabal Cut was even better, even in its non remastered vhs (and possibly overly long) format. The character of Lori especially gets the best service as she is no longer just a worried girlfriend of the protagonist, but a fully fleshed out dual protagonist herself. More depth is given to many side characters and creatures that got the bare minimum of development in the original film. The ending is also completely different!

Clive Barker's vision for this film was never fully realised, in fact it's why he got turned off working with Hollywood, until now. Due to enduring fans and hard work, Barker is so eternally grateful and I hope feels ready to extend the Cabal mythos as he originally intended to.

The great thing with this bluray limited edition set it has an extra disc of special features, and the Theatrical cut of Nightbreed on bluray for the first time too. It makes it easier to compare the two versions. Unfortunately it is in limited supply. Hopefully WB will see the demand and extend the rights and work with Fear to see this superb edition gets more release. It also has exclusive artwork approved by Clive Barker himself. Doug Bradley's revoiced his character as it was dubbed in the theatrical version. Long live classic horror!
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on October 29, 2014
Finally, at last and about time too, we FINALLY get a director's cut of this film. And while it still is not perfect - I think "perfect" for this film would merit at least an X rating - overall it has improved a lot. There is more explanation for those who may not have read the novella, of what is going on and why. We get more backstory for Lori, although its actually wrong - Lori is not a nightclub singer, she is a white-collar office worker, minor quibble - Sheryl's insertion into the movie makes a little more sense and what ends up happening to Ashbury also makes more sense, since both versions of the film skate right over just why he is so markedly at Eigerman's beck and call. [I loved Sheryl in the novella and she was important to the story. But in the first movie she was just sort of shoehorned in.] But best of all, the ending has now changed.

BEWARE SPOILERS FOLLOWING, PLEASE!:

In this version, Decker is DENIED resurrection as Nightbreed, as he should be. The original story states that Boone goes out of his way to explicitly deny him resurrection, then in the original film what does he do but resurrect. *big sigh* Decker dies here, and he stays dead. GOOD. Boone doesn't end up in essence leaving Lori on a hilltop as he does in the original film, she actually goes through death and resurrection as she is supposed to do, and now they will be together forever. One of the final shots in this version is of a painting on Midian's "lore/history" wall, showing a rough outline of a couple, standing underneath a starry sky and standing over a decorative arc of skulls. It has been foretold that they would meet, right along with the rest of the 'Breed's history. Excellent! Boone needs Lori, she is essential to what he has to do.

I do wish Barker has told us more about this fascinating set of characters in further works, because "Cabal" is probably my favorite work of his. But..... since that didn't happen, this is what we have. The Blu-ray is diamond-clear, really enjoyable to watch. I saw a lot of details I'd never noticed before in many watchings of the original. Casting is excellent and I am delighted to add this extended cut to my library.
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