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Nine Innings Paperback – September 16, 1994

4.2 out of 5 stars 38 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Daniel Okrent, the author of The Ultimate Baseball Book, has written not just another windy paean to the national pastime, full of labored metaphors and recollections of demolished stadiums, but a detailed, digressive breakdown of a single early-season game between the Milwaukee Brewers and the Baltimore Orioles on June 10, 1982. Along the way the reader learns about the history of the slider, the building of the Orioles by their famed manager, Earl Weaver, how batters' swings reveal their personality, and even which brand of vitamin C can be found in a certain player's locker. It's a labor of love, but an enthralling one that reveals the complexities at the heart of this most complex and maddening game.

Review

Every baseball fan worthy of the name will surely want to read this. -- Publishers Weekly
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Mariner Books (September 16, 1994)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0395710405
  • ISBN-13: 978-0395710401
  • Product Dimensions: 8.2 x 5.4 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (38 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #6,175,268 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Robert Wellen on January 4, 2005
Format: Paperback
As a young boy, I read Okrent's Ultimate Baseball book. As a much older man, I watched Okrent on Ken Burns' Baseball and enjoyed his witty thoughts. Finally, I came to 9 Innings. It is a terrific read. What a great idea to look at the world of baseball through the lens of one game. It was a fascinating look at the game and the Brewers in the their brief glory days. Everything from the grounds crew to the ownership books was noted. The game, between the AL Champion '82 Brewers and the soon to be World Champion '83 Orioles, was entertaining. But, the picture of life in a small market and behind the scenes stuff is the best. The updates at the end strangely gloss over a Brewers team that came within one win of the World Championship and ignore the Orioles championships (and Hall of Famers Murray and Ripken) entirely. That is ok. A brillant book by a real traditionalist. Not dated if you are a true fan.
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Format: Paperback
In Nine Innings, Daniel Okrent focuses on a single game - on June 10, 1982 - between the Milwaukee Brewers and the Baltimore Orioles. Through the game, Okrent hopes to show the reader how baseball games are won (or lost) long before they are actually played. The book is a success and baseball fans should not miss it.

Okrent discusses the hidden side of the June 10th game. More interestingly, Okrent also explains the past decisions that had built the 1982 Brewers. He goes back to Brewers owner Bud Selig's purchase of the bankrupt Seattle Pilots in 1970 , the team's move to Milwaukee, and all of Selig's efforts to build a winner.

Nine Innings is lively and easy to read at just 260 pages. Okrent excels at writing short, interesting portraits of the people in the book. (Interestingly, he writes of beloved Brewers broadcaster Bob Uecker - "With the players, he was always charming; at other times, though, he could be brutally cold" (pp. 233-234)). On occasion, Okrent's prose can be a little too flowery, but - on the whole - the book is well written.

As a kid in the 1980s, I loved baseball. Nine Innings brought back so many memories of players I had admired, but long forgotten: Don Money, Ted Simmons, Ben Oglivie, and so many others. The book reminded me of the wonder that I felt at baseball before I became a middle-aged cynic :)

Any baseball fan - regardless of age - will enjoy Nine Innings.
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Format: Paperback
Dan Okrent went to the Oriole-Brewer game of June 10, 1982, and here he gives a play-by-play account of the game with enormous background on each team. He shows how a baseball game is like an iceberg -- how what you actually see of it is just one-tenth of what it's all about. If you've spent the last few years wondering about Bud Selig, Okrent offers a comprehensive look at today's acting commissioner. Arnold Hano wrote a similar book about Game One of the 1954 World Series (A DAY IN THE BLEACHERS), but Okrent proves just how compelling a non-descript game in mid-season can be in its own right
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Format: Paperback
I love Daniel Okrent, the public editor of the NY Times. I find his column -- and the very existence of his job -- to be fascinating, and I am always interested in what he has to say. It turns out, however, that my love of Okrent goes deeper than just his current position. Last night I finished reading his book Nine Innings. The book covers the Brewers-Orioles game that took place on June 10, 1982. No, there's nothing special about that game, even though the Brewers managed to make it to the World Series that year. It's just one game in the middle of the season, and he covers it in excrutiating depth, using pitching changes and at-bats as excuses to ruminate on everything related to the history of the game, the biographies of the individual players, the city of Milwaukee, and oh so much more.

Unlike Moneyball, which I recommend that everyone reads whether or not they are baseball fans (and if you haven't read it yet, shame on you. go get it now), I don't think Nine Innings would appeal to anyone who is not already a baseball fan. Or maybe a Milwaukeean. But if you are, I suggest you find this book
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
"9 Innings" is an eloquent, entertaining, erudite book, marred only by a kind of drive-by criticism of evangelicals. The book reminds me of David Halberstam's famous "Summer of `49" in its clarity and wit, and in its ability to enrich the main narrative with delightfully written vignettes about the principal participants. I'm sorry to say that it reminds me of "Summer of `49" in one other way. Whereas "Summer of `49" contains some uncharacteristically splenetic passages concerning a vague, ill-defined Calvinism, "9 Innings" does something very similar to evangelicals. The suspicion that this part of the text is really a pretext for venting about a pet peeve is confirmed by the fact that the jumping-off point for this section is a discussion of Sal Bando, including his religion, but the book points out that Bando is not an evangelical. Then, the book tells us that "many in baseball" don't like the way evangelicals talk about God's will, the author doesn't like Baseball Chapel, and the San Francisco Giants organization is especially plagued with evangelicals using God's will as an excuse. No specific examples of what the offending Giants actually said are given. Indeed, one of the few specific examples given, of anything an evangelical said or did to offend, is Bob McClure's intimation that God may have had something to do with his recovery from a torn rotator cuff. This is beyond the pale because it "had little to do with matters at hand." Yet, on the very next page, Ted Simmons is mentioned approvingly for his opinion on the Equal Rights Amendment. Perhaps Mr. Okrent got his ERA's confused. I'm typing this review from a country where tens of thousands of evangelicals have suffered and/or died because of religious persecution and, even now, many are languishing in prison.Read more ›
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