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No More Mr. Nice Guy: A Life of Hardball Hardcover – August, 1990

4.6 out of 5 stars 8 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

There are many in baseball who will question whether Williams ever was Mr. Nice Guy, for he stepped on a great many toes in his 20-year managerial career. Yet he will always be acknowledged as a winner in both leagues with great teams like the Oakland A's of the early '70s and awful ones as well, like the Seattle Mariners of the mid-'80s. Because, as he notes here, he is a battler and disdains players who are not, he feels out of step with today's pampered, moody, overpaid athletes. The outspoken Williams, writing with freelancer Plaschke, even blasts certain owners, rare in a baseball autobiography: Tom Yawkey, Charley Finley, Ray and Joan Kroc, among others. But he has heroes, too, like Carl Yastrzemski, Reggie Jackson and Goose Gossage, his type of stars. Diamond fans will enjoy the book immensely.
Copyright 1990 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal

The title of this fast-paced memoir is an ironic one. During his 21-year managerial career, Williams was known for his hard-bitten, confrontational ways with players and management. He had a passion--indeed a compulsion--for winning. He won pennants for three different teams. His first pennant for the Boston Red Sox in 1967 was judged to be a baseball miracle. Williams shows baseball life as it is in his book. One of the main themes is the effect of the travel, daily grind, and pressures on a manager's family. His stressful baseball career nearly ruined Williams's family life. Late in his career Williams discovered that whatever joy he once felt in baseball had faded. As a manager in the new Senior League he is finding happiness and contentment. Recommended for larger sports collections.
- Paul Kaplan, Highland Park P.L., Ill.
Copyright 1990 Reed Business Information, Inc.
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 344 pages
  • Publisher: Harcourt; First Edition edition (August 1990)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0151667284
  • ISBN-13: 978-0151667284
  • Product Dimensions: 1 x 6.2 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,358,808 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
Dick Williams writes the way he managed - honest, to the point, and in your face. 'No More Mr. Nice Guy' reads with the passion that he felt for the game and leaves you with a bit of sadness at, not only the way the game has changed, by how the Dick Williams's of the world have gone unappreciated. He took three different teams to the World Series, he perhaps saved the Padres from being sold, he took the Expos (yes the Expos) to winning seasons, he delivered nothing short of a miracle in 1967 with the Red Sox and he even pushed a couple of teams to winning even the players themselves weren't sure if that's what they wanted. This isn't to mention two rings with the Oakland A's.

It's sad the Hall of Fame has overlooked this guy. Not only is it a case of what more do you have to do, in the case of Dick Williams, it's what more could he have possibly done?
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Format: Hardcover
I have been a fan of Dick Willams and the San Deigo Padres for a long time.This book has been a favorite of mine! I have always admired Dick Williams for his no nonsense approach and turning losing teams into winners. This book is entertaining and provides the inside thoughts and soul searching straight from the heart.Thank you to Dick and congratulations on the hall of fame.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Dick Williams never had a problem that he couldn't blame on somebody else. Owners, players, writers, everybody had something to do with his failures as a manager. Other than that, the book is worth reading because he tells his version unadorned, without politeness and right to the point. Nowadays, baseball books are boring, because they want to tell us some stories, but without hurting the feelings of those involved, so the story is always incomplete, just for the sake of avoiding controversy. He has a good point about baseball owners. They are people who usually make money out of another business, then they purchase a team and they strongly believe that that solely fact make them baseball saviors or baseball gurus. And there's something you can't take off Williams: wherever he arrived, he turned a loser in a winner and that's remarkable.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Williams wanted in the worst way to win, and this is how he did so while running rough-shod over players who stood in his way. If that's the way he was, fine, but I, in the end, got tired of his self-serving, act. He was named to the Hall of Fame in 2008, as he should have been, and thankfully before his death in 2011. Too many guys never get to experience the election and he was able to stand and thank the people who helped him get there. I was glad to find that Garry Templeton was a better person than he was made out to be in the press. That is one thing I give Williams credit for, he doesn't care what the reputation of any of the players were, if they were good, he gave them credit.

Buy this book for some insights into baseball in the last third of the 20th century.
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