Buy Used
$9.82
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by TOKYO LINE
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Japanese editions and imports. We are unable to guarantee the availability of special accessories and bonus items, including OBIs, photocards, posters and a box for CD/DVD set, for pre-owned products. We will carefully package your order and ship within 5 business days by SAL service with Japan Post. Please read Important Store Policies on our Store Front. Any questions you may have, please feel free to contact us. Thank you.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

No Parole From Rock & Roll Import

4.5 out of 5 stars 29 customer reviews

See all 11 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Audio CD, Import, October 20, 1998
$70.00 $9.82

Stream Millions of Songs FREE with Amazon Prime
Unlimited Streaming with Amazon Prime Start your 30-day free trial to stream millions of songs FREE with Amazon Prime. Start your free trial.

Editorial Reviews

Features Yngwie Malmsteen (Guitar) and Graham Bonnet (Vocals) this Was Yngwie's Second Studio Album and Helped Kick off the Neoclassical Hard Rock Trend in the Eighties.
  • Sample this album Artist (Sample)
1
30
3:58
Listen Now $1.29
 
2
30
4:52
Listen Now $1.29
 
3
30
4:30
Listen Now $1.29
 
4
30
4:03
Listen Now $1.29
 
5
30
6:13
Listen Now $1.29
 
6
30
1:26
Listen Now $1.29
 
7
30
4:23
Listen Now $1.29
 
8
30
4:09
Listen Now $1.29
 
9
30
3:56
Listen Now $1.29
 
10
30
4:19
Listen Now $1.29
 

Product Details

  • Audio CD (October 20, 1998)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Import
  • Label: Import [Generic]
  • ASIN: B00000768Q
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (29 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #766,906 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Amazon's Alcatrazz Store

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By John DeWald on July 27, 2000
Format: Audio CD
This was the first album I owned that featured Yngwie Malmsteen. I was in high school at the time and had read about Yngwie in several magazines. A local radio station played "Island in the Sun" one evening and the song caught my ear - the next day I purchased it on vinyl.
I just recently received this album on CD and have finally been able to listen to the tunes again. To sum it up: it's a very fun record and for Yngwie fans, a must-own item. Compared to the Steeler disc, Yngwie sounds more at ease and his playing fits the songs much more, no doubt due to the fact that Yngwie had about zero writing input with Steeler.
With Alcatrazz, Yngwie wrote or co-wrote every tune and the difference is rather night-and-day because of it. Graham Bonnet does some good work, although his vocal style is a rather raspy half-shout at times. Still, if you like Graham's work with Rainbow or MSG, you'll do fine with this. You can even hear some progressive-sounding elements in some songs, too, which again is a step forward from Steeler. This band is definitely several notches up from Steeler.
To compare it to Yngwie's solo debut would be tough to do. Alcatrazz was more of a vocal-oriented/rock project and probably more accessible to the casual rock fan. Yngwie still gets plenty of spots to shine instrumentally, however, so don't get the feeling that Yngwie only gets little 8-bar solos. If you are an Yngwie fanatic, you'll want both this album and Alcatrazz's live disc, "Live Sentence".
Comment 9 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By Peter on December 30, 2003
Format: Audio CD
Like Martin Popoff, the witty and highly knowledgeable author of the informative Collector's Guide to Heavy Metal, I have to concede that this is one of my 25 all time favorite metal albums. Notwithstanding obvious similarities with Rainbow, Alcatrazz proved to be innovators in their own right by taking the strongest musical and lyrical elements of that band along with incorporating their own ambitious concepts with the result that Ritchie Blackmore's contemporary albums with Joe Lynn Turner appeared comparatively bland and unadventurous.
Popoff is exactly right in contending that Graham Bonnet exerted a strong influence on Yngwie on this masterful album as the latter's riffs and solos are more distinguished than those of the Rising Force era. For example, "General Hospital" features a haunting opening riff and an unusual chord progression which suggests that Graham influenced Yngwie to allocate more focus to the unpredictable tempo changes than would ordinarily be featured on Yngwie's subsequent catalogue. Whereas on future songs like "Dark Ages" where it is clear that Yngwie cannot wait to solo immediately following the second chorus, on "General Hospital" he exhibits unconventional patience and commences the solo at a junture elevating the track to a higher dramatic plane.
Read more ›
Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Not long before the onset of Bay Area thrash and European proto-black bands like Venom and Hellhammer, soon to be Celtic Frost, and just after the assault of one Eddie Van Halen, the predominant heavier music was along the lines of Sabbath, Led Zeppelin, who still were mighty influences after their demise, and Rainbow/Deep Purple. along with other similar outfits like UFO or Scorpions who rocked mightily in the face of dying disco and the synth pop of new wave outfits like A Flock of Seagulls and a ton of other nameless twits.
Motorhead, Judas Priest and Venom were about as fierce as anything, but with the exception of Priest, Motorhead were simply too bombastic for their early days before becoming the rock and roll icons they are today, same with Venom.
So it's no surprise that labels were scrambling for hot shot guitarists to capitalize on the Van Halen phenomenon, and among them was a very young Yngwie Malmsteen, who had first gotten attention with Steeler and then joined Alcatrazz for its debut, "No Parole From Rock and Roll", along with Graham Bonnet, late of Rainbow. Sonically, it was a sound highly reminiscent of Rainbow, with Malmsteen favoring his classical approach ala his mentor Ritchie Blackmore. It was to be a watershed moment, and possibly his most refined work because he had to be a part of a band that wrote good tunes, and had yet to become the egomaniac he's famous for today, not to mention helping spawn a dreadful flood of shredders, most of whom could burn up a fretboard easily but couldn't write a decent song to save their asses. It was guitar music for wankers, and today it remains an isolated genre for those who can't get enough notes crammed into a measure.
Read more ›
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Forums



What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Look for Similar Items by Category