Industrial Deals Beauty Best Books of the Year Black Friday Deals Week nav_sap_plcc_ascpsc Listen for a chance to win STEM Starting at $39.99 Try it first with samples Handmade Gift Shop Book a house cleaner for 2 or more hours on Amazon soul2soul soul2soul soul2soul  Three new members of the Echo family All-New Fire HD 8, starting at $79.99 All-New Kindle Oasis GNO Shop Now HTL17_gno

Nobody's Fool (1994)
Format: DVD|Change
Price:$18.88+ Free shipping with Amazon Prime


on August 7, 2016
An excellent treatment of Richard Russo's novel of the same name. Staring Paul Newman, Jessica Tandy, Melanie Griffin and Bruce Willis (who actually acts in this one) it centers around ner-do-well Donald "Sully" Sullivan (Newman) and his generally fractured relationships with family and neighbors in the fictional small town of North Bath NY. To borrow from the GoodReads review: "follows the unexpected operation of grace in a deadbeat town in upstate New York—and in the life of one of its unluckiest citizens, Sully, who has been doing the wrong thing triumphantly for fifty years." Newman's wonderfully nuanced performance shows why he was a leading man for nearly fifty years. BTW: those interested might enjoy the mini-series "Empire Falls" (also based on a Richard Russo novel) starring Newman and is, in effect, a sequel to "Nobody's Fool" with different character names. An actual sequel "Everybody's Fool" featuring the same characters was published in 2016.
7 helpful votes
8 helpful votes
|
0Comment|Report abuse
on May 16, 2016
The older Paul Newman looks pretty darn good! So good, in fact, that he makes his ne'er-do-well character, Sully, more appealing than he otherwise might be. Sully works construction, or whatever is around, drinks--a lot more moderately than one would guess--and hangs out with a (mostly) touching bunch of local characters. Having abandoned his son years ago, the son, an out of work college professor, turns out also to be someone who just can't resist Newman's--I mean his dad's--charm. So big-hearted is Newman's Sully that even when he has the chance to run off with Melanie Griffith, about half his age and very attractive, he turns it down in order to be--presumably--a better grandpa than he had been a father. The feel is pretty genuinely Richard Russo, although somehow Russo's novel seemed just a tad less sentimental than this film.
5 helpful votes
6 helpful votes
|
0Comment|Report abuse
on May 21, 2015
Old man with a past and bad judgement goes through life his way. He runs into his son and his son's family over the holidays this year and makes an effort to make amends for running out on them. He shows that while having made many mistakes and continuing to make a few more he is a stand up guy looking after people he cares about. Could do without the profanity and Melanie Griffith showing her boobs but actually that fits for a many like guy I think. Really nothing scandalous here. Nothing really offensive. Just a man trying to get together showing we all don't become rich or want to. We all don't do what we are supposed to but doesn't mean we are evil. I enjoyed this movie.
1 helpful vote
|
0Comment|Report abuse
on January 30, 2012
This film wouldn't be nearly as successful without the wondrous
understated performance by Newman.

He plays Sully, a small town man who has long since lost his family due
to his drinking, and who never amounted to much in life, but still has
a sharp sense of humor, life, sexuality, and even rage burning in
himself at age 60.

It's also a genial slice of small town life, related to Benton's
'Places in the Heart', but less treacly, and with a less Hollywood
spin. The characters (a terrific supporting cast including Jessica
Tandy, and both Bruce Willis and Melanie Griffith doing some of the
best work they've ever done) are off-beat, without it feeling like
writer/director Benton was sweating hard to create 'quirky'.

Nothing all that much happens in the film, yet people grow and change,
just like in real life.

Not quite a great film, but it still captures a sweet, almost Caprasque
Americana, without becoming cloying. The movie, like Newman, never
pushes hard, and that goes a long way.
2 helpful votes
3 helpful votes
|
0Comment|Report abuse
on November 1, 2016
Russo's classic book was followed by a classic movie with a first class cast. I have read the follow up book (10 years later) and enjoyed the lineup of upstate losers. Well written and great reading if you have patience....
1 helpful vote
|
0Comment|Report abuse
on June 16, 2013
Old men work until we die: forgotten members of productive society, no longer part of breathing souls in our post-industrial society of Unemployment & Corporate Investment in China, we all know the lost 50+ citizen who barely survives. Tossed out of every family, only drinking friends continue to know them. We sense their danger: most die homeless, with friends dying before them, and no means of support.

But, there are a few who can still stand - mostly on their own - with few remaining friends & patriots of America lost. Sully, boldly American and staunch defender of his own liberties becomes a grandfather. Unwittingly, at first, Sully realizes other members of his extended family have lives, filled with emotions, and they need him. Strangely, the old man arrives at the decision to include his family in his life; but, first, he has to finalize the delusion of stealing the most beautiful woman in North Bath.

Trauma and abuse rang in his childhood mansion on the hill: where Sully's father brutalized his own family, including our Sully. Despite his obvious leadership abilities and natural talents, Sully had squandered his impressive gifts. Instead, life was met with no sense of personal commitment: minimal wages, no plans for any future, and little or no earnings for child support. His son was grown, had his own family, and had lost his professorship when Sully's life refocused on today's news.

Every second, within every minute, of this tightly constructed play-movie is superbly crafted, acted, and intensely understated as American small-town, only. Newman knew what he held in his hands when he accepted Russo's divinely inspired work. The film is one of the best adaptations from an outstanding full-length book you will ever find in your lifetime. I enjoy the reality, and the closeness we enjoy from all the characters. Each character lives the days, Sully moves from zero to grandfather, his own tormentor becomes Sully's guest when he's thrown-out ... And, reward of his patience and suffering arrives in his home of friends as he stares down his father's ghost.

Through our lives, we've known - or, thought we knew - Sully in our city, town, or village. We had always wondered why there was not a higher purpose or goal for his intellect, status, or ability. Perhaps, we were too busy witnessing our own evolution and personal growth; or, it could be we forgot the Sully's of the world by dehumanizing their personal secrets that started at home. This film gives plenty to observe, and re-purpose our own shortcomings to extend our sense of humanity for the very real Sully we witness each day. Get out and find your old friends & schoolmates! Find out, What happened, and maybe this film can bring a smile.
1 helpful vote
|
0Comment|Report abuse
on July 16, 2016
I have had the book for a while. I saw the movie when it first came out in theaters. I love Paul Newman forever. I had not read the book, I kept putting it off because it was so thick and it did take me a while to read it but it was worth it. Very good story. I wanted to see the movie again and watched it before I finished the book. While reading I kept picturing Paul Newman as the main character and he was perfect in this role. Now I'm reading that there is a sequel to the book. Will read that too. This is a funny, sweet story about family. I think anyone would enjoy it.
1 helpful vote
|
0Comment|Report abuse
on September 6, 2015
It was a very enjoyable movie; however, the movie is unusual. There wasn’t much in the way or action, or a real love story, or even drama - and some may feel the pace was somewhat slow – either in spite of those things - or maybe because of them – the movie was very enjoyable. The characters, although flawed, were charismatic. The movie was full of snappy repartee, and was actually quite funny (although often in a dry, dark, or cynical way) – my wife and I both laughed out loud multiple times. The movie kept our interest throughout. I tend to prefer action movies, yet I found this movie very entertaining.

And the Oscar for Best Actor goes to ---- the snowblower!? If you see the movie, this will make sense….
1 helpful vote
|
0Comment|Report abuse
This is a gentle, small movie about small-town living and its citizens, particularly a blatantly unapologetic ne'er-do-well named Sully (Paul Newman) who has lived his life exactly as he wants to and manages, by optimism and the bonding in this town, to survive quite well in spite of himself.

Sully has co-existed with his former eighth-grade teacher for apparent decades (the great Jessica Tandy, in her next-to-last performance), living in an upstairs apartment and doing - when he remembers to - odd jobs for her as well as keeping an eye on her. He is constantly at odds with her stuffy bank-manager son (Josef Sommer) who wants Sully out of his mother's house; Sully is also at mild odds with several other people in town, including his ex-wife, and an uncredited performance by Bruce Willis as Carl Roebuck, a local construction-site manager who is frittering away the family fortune on trips with floozy office assistants. The cast is stuffed with excellent actors and performances, at a time when some of them were just becoming known; Philip Seymour Hoffman plays a local policeman who makes Barney Fife look competent, and Melanie Griffith, as Carl Roebuck's exasperated wife, plays an excellent foil to Sully, who banters with her as he steals her husband's snowblower with her tacit consent.

The film meanders amiably along through the month between Thanksgiving and Christmas, as Sully deals with various small crises in his life and amongst the citizens of the town. There is a comfortableness about this movie that makes you want to just sit back and enjoy it; nothing momentous happens, just the normal give-and-take of a town this size, where everybody knows everybody and even the most hopeless members of the community are given plenty of slack (Sully is let out of jail to be a pallbearer at one point)and the clear affection amongst most of the community comes through plainly.

I absolutely love this little classic, and I believe it deserves to be on the shelf alongside everyone's favourite holiday movies; since it spans both Thanksgiving and Christmas, it could fit either. The tolerance and humour shown throughout the film feels as welcome as an old and well-loved article of clothing, and the fine filming is enhanced by an underplayed and sweet score by Howard Shore.
12 helpful votes
13 helpful votes
|
0Comment|Report abuse
on May 30, 2015
I'd never viewed this movie before, and chose to watch it because of Paul Newman because he was such a good actor. I found the movie interesting, although a bit depressing to watch at times because the lives of the characters were so sad. I could have done without the bare-breasts of the woman at the poker table and some of the profanity, but the quick chest flash that Meg Ryan's character gave Sully (Newman) was cute and said a lot about their connection.
Though I don't want it to be a spoiler, I will say I liked the ending of the movie. Funny. I'd actually have like to followed a few of the characters further to see some of life changes that would be coming down the pike as a result of Sully's decisions.
Worth watching, folks.
1 helpful vote
|
0Comment|Report abuse