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Nonograms

2.8 out of 5 stars 36 customer reviews



Product Description

Nonograms is a puzzle game designed to delight logic and number puzzle lovers.

Nonograms contains simple yet challenging puzzles, in which your goal is to uncover a hidden black and white pattern. The puzzles contain a grid with number clues that tell you how many groups of black squares there are in any given row or column, and how many black squares there are in each group. With this information, and some skillfully applied logic, you can solve the puzzle.

With three difficulty levels, Nonograms can be enjoyed by beginners and experts alike. An optional game clock lets you see how quickly you can solve the puzzles, and you can try to beat your best time for each difficulty level. If you find a puzzle too hard, you can ask for hints or view the solution to that puzzle. Nonograms randomly generates new grids, so it is unlikely that you will ever run out of puzzles to solve.

Nonograms are an enjoyable way to exercise your mind, and if you like sudoku and similar number grid puzzles, you'll love Nonograms.

Product details

  • Version: 1.1 (What's new in version 1.1)
  • Release Date: March 6, 2012
  • File Size: 535 kB
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Metalgrass Software
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services LLC
  • ASIN: B0055PO0CY
  • Publisher License: Read
  • Average Customer Review: 2.8 out of 5 stars 36 customer reviews
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #735,739 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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By Kelly M. Cassidy on January 1, 2012
Verified Purchase
The prior reviewers have covered most of the bases. The Nonogram puzzles are like the Pixel Perfect Puzzles (PPP), except that the Pixel Perfect Puzzles are far better designed and free. (Kind of interesting that the free puzzles are better than the pay version. Go figure.)

The Nonogram puzzles are evidently computer generated and so the solution doesn't create a recognizable image. Although the Pixel Perfect pictures are hardly great art, I found it so much more satisfying to see the picture revealed when the puzzle was solved instead of a random arrangement of black and white squares.

The PPP controls are far easier on the fingers, especially when filling in a bunch of squares down a row or column.

The very worst aspect of the Nonogram puzzles is the lack of heavier lines at 5-square intervals like in the PPP version. That's not a huge problem in the easiest 10 x 10 puzzles. Eye strain starts to develop in the 15 x 15 puzzles. At the 20 x 20 puzzles, I threw in the towel before I went blind trying to count tiny squares with no 5-square reference lines.

The one advantage of the Nonogram book over Pixel Perfect Puzzles is that the number of Nonogram puzzles (being computer generated) is infinite, or close enough to infinite that the human brain couldn't tell the difference. You'll never run out of these puzzles. (But if you are determined to do the 20 x 20s, be prepared for your eyes to feel like they've been rubbed in sand.)
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These are all great puzzles, and well implemented. Nonograms, Hanjie, Paint by Numbers, Griddlers are some of the names for this puzzle type. It was originally developed by Non Ishida in Japan, in 1988. However, there is also a free version of these called Pixel Perfect Puzzles. Should you pay for this version, of get the free version first. Yeah, get the free version.

The logic aspects involve figuring out forced squares and unfillable squares, and continually going back and forth to figure out the status of more squares.

One drawback on these... all of these puzzles are randomly generated. Some might not be solvable, and they probably won't ever make recognizable pictures of any sort.

This is well implemented, though, and a good set of puzzle, for when you're done with Pixel Perfect. I recommend it (barely).
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I love this Kindle game. It is lots of fun, and very challenging! I only wish that you could hold down the button to highlight a square, and scroll across to highlight a whole run of squares at once! The constant button clicking is a little maddening. Additionally, it would be nice if the game would accept all valid solutions. I have finished games with a good solution, but because two squares are flip-flopped (but still an ok play) the game will not accept the solution! My favorite part of the game is the "maybe" function. I have played other versions of this game without this function and it is not as fun since I spend so much time counting squares, and it becomes really easy to make mistakes! I also love that the games are unlimited! The other versions of this game only offer a limited number of puzzles. So, all in all, this is a fun game and I spend way too much time playing it
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I very much like the random aspect of these puzzles. With picture solutions, I would find myself "cheating" by looking at the picture to figure out the puzzle, especially since many of the solutions are symmetrical. I prefer to use only the number clues to complete the puzzle.

The controls on this game, though, are terrible. It does have wrap-around, which is great, but it's PAINFULLY slow. Also, there's no way to rapidly fill in a lot of squares in a row, you have to fill each one individually. Not a big deal if you have only a few, but any more than that is a giant pain, especially (again) because the controls are SO slow.

It looks like they have addressed earlier complaints and added more heavily drawn lines after every 5 squares.
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Of the 3 versions for Kindle. I like it best. First, there are no silly pictures, only randomly generated grids in 3 sizes 10 by 10, 15 by 15, or 20 by 20. You will never be finished with it. Two, input is really easy, use the 4 way function to move to a square, press the space bar to make it "black", or any key directly above the space bar to make it "not black", there are also 2 other possibilities-"maybe black" or "maybe not black".

There are only 1 or 2 drawbacks, every 5th gridline is not heavily drawn and I find the 20 by 20 to be a little too small for my eyes especially without every 5th gridline not being heavily drawn.
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I have several similar puzzle collections and this is by far the least easy to use- having to hunt for the letters on the keypad to push instead of being able to use the page turning buttons on the side is awkward. Also, you cannot just hold down a button and push the right/left/up/down control on the 5-way to black out consecutive squares. Other puzzles automatically cross off the numbers when a cluster of colored in squares is complete helping you keep track of what needs to be done yet. If I were using a real pencil doing the puzzle on paper, I would be marking out those numbers; not being able to do so electronically is extremely frustrating. I would not have bought this had I been able to try it out first. Only positive is- It's cheap, for sure.
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