Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Audible Sample
Playing...
Loading...
Paused

Now & Then Audible – Unabridged

4.0 out of 5 stars 60 customer reviews

See all 11 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Audible, Unabridged
"Please retry"
$0.00
Free with your Audible trial

Read & Listen

Switch between reading the Kindle book & listening on the Audible narration with Whispersync for Voice.
Get the Audible audiobook for the reduced price of $3.99 after you buy the Kindle book.
Free with Audible trial
$0.00
Buy with 1-Click
$17.95

Sold and delivered by Audible, an Amazon company


Product Details

  • Audible Audio Edition
  • Listening Length: 12 hours and 30 minutes
  • Program Type: Audiobook
  • Version: Unabridged
  • Publisher: Brilliance Audio
  • Audible.com Release Date: March 1, 2011
  • Whispersync for Voice: Ready
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B004Q3KZKM
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank:

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By D. Williams VINE VOICE on August 13, 2009
Format: Paperback
I give this work four stars, but I wish there were something like a 3.5.

It's interesting to consider two very twenty-first century characters (lawyer Anna and her troubled nephew Joseph) in 1840's Ireland, each simply trying to survive, one way or another. Anna wants nothing but to find her nephew; Joseph isn't so sure he wants to be found. Both find love among the people of the 1840's. Both have to remember not to mention things that we take for granted in the twenty-first century.

However, there are some flaws. Madigan, the Irish wolfhound, turns out to be important to the story but he does not seem to be present as much as the sweet photo on the cover would imply. Also, the supposed "nineteeth century Irish" language ("lad," "lass", "bairn") impresses me more as Scot than Irish. There are differences, and I would've liked to see something in the back matter that indicated that the author had done her linguistic homework.

This is an enjoyable book, but I think it could have been even better.
Comment 9 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
There are some excellent parts to this novel, but the flaws outweigh the good parts. We get often tedious mundane detail combined with 'magical' parts that force us to suspend our disbelief and imagine the main female protagonist in the novel and her troubled teenage nephew have gone back in time to Cork before the Irish Famine. There are some convincing details of Irish life but the sense of location is lacking and the historical detail is very basic, the information on the language even less so. The Irish wolfhound does not play nearly as much of a role throughout the story as you might imagine from the cover.
The ending is both the best and the worst part of the book. Some action happens, but a lot of it is 'off-stage'. Without giving away too many spoilers, it is also very predictable. All of it is completely rushed and could have been fleshed out for another 50 pages or so to leave us with a really lasting impression of having gone on an incredible journey. As it was it left me wondering why I had stuck with the book for nearly 400 pages.
One other issue is the genre. What on earth is it? It is from Avon and has elements of romance, paranormal romance elements, and historical fiction material, plus women's novels, all thrown in, complete with gory details about endless miscarriages. I wish the book had been more uplifting, perhaps more romantic? Because of the mish-mash of genres, it does not really satisfy on any level. Add to that the very non-fiction-looking modern cover, and I got a confusing book that I am glad I read, but wished had been a lot better, especially the conclusion, and less stereotypical in relation to Ireland and the Irish.
Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By Nemo on November 25, 2012
Format: Paperback
This book is just not very good. It is full of cliches (Miscarriages! Affairs! Divorces! Attempted rapes! Abusive fathers! Serious car accidents! In-trouble teenager!), the premise is ludacris (They go back in time once to solve a curse that was caused by that one trip back in time?), stereotypes are abundant (the Irish are all-caring, horse loving people and some of them have magic powers!) the characters are not very filled out, and the main character, Anna, is frankly horribly annoying and not very likeable. It also has a quick-fix ending that is neither realistic, not satisfactory, and the writing, while not terrible, is not very good either.
The book reads very much as therapy for the author, and it does not seem like the author really knows much about the subject she is trying to portray, as points in the book do not even make sense- in an area where accents are common,change from town to town, and people pay attention to them, the characters probably would not believe Joseph's tale that he is from Canada and Anna from America because they would have the same accent.
I would skip this book unless there is nothing else around.
P.S. If you are thinking about reading it because of the role the dogs seem to play from the book description, you will be disappointed, the dogs are hardly present until the very, very end.
Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
As in Ms. Sheehan's previous book, Lost and Found, she uses language so richly that she creates a full world for the reader. I love this kind of book. The characters become people you know and care about, even while these happen to be hurdling through time in a nearly believable fashion. My only problem is that I was so compelled by the plot, needing to eat up the book fast enough to keep up with my curiosity as to their fate, that I know I missed some of the lovely descriptive language. The only answer is to put it down for a few months and then read it again, more slowly, and savor it.
Comment 12 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By gjr on September 10, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
First of all, I have to in fairness admit that I was the only one on my book club that really didn't like this book--others rated it considerably higher. So, for what it's worth.... Beginning with the cover--that looks more like Annie's Sandy than it does a huge Irish wolfhound. Then it was downhill from there. This time-travel-based novel takes two people, an aunt and her nephew, back to just-before-the-Great-Famine-Ireland, one of them to the home of a rich landowner and the other to the poorest of the poor. Sheehan utilizes every possible cliche for their subsequent experiences until they, you guessed it, undo the Irish curse and come back to where they started from. I would have given this one star, except that I did appreciate the author's attempt to focus on the horrors of the poverty and injustice of Irish life in the mid-nineteenth century.
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse