Olive Thomas: The Life and Death of a Silent Film Beauty Kindle Edition

4.1 out of 5 stars 25 customer reviews

ISBN-13: 978-0786429080
ISBN-10: 0786429089
Why is ISBN important?
ISBN
This bar-code number lets you verify that you're getting exactly the right version or edition of a book. The 13-digit and 10-digit formats both work.
Scan an ISBN with your phone
Use the Amazon App to scan ISBNs and compare prices.
Kindle App Ad
Buy
$3.99
eBook features:
Sold by: Amazon Digital Services LLC
Digital List Price: $24.99

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Price
New from Used from
Kindle, March 21, 2007
"Please retry"
$3.99

Calendars for Cat Lovers
Browse a selection of 2017 calendars perfect for cat owners and enthusiasts. See more
click to open popover

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.


Editorial Reviews

Review

Full of beautiful photography and rare candids...this is the perfect tribute to a woman that many have long forgotten --The Midnight Palace

About the Author

Film historian Michelle Vogel is the author of Marjorie Main (2006), Children of Hollywood (2005) and Gene Tierney (2005). She lives in Brooklyn, New York.

Product Details

  • File Size: 6158 KB
  • Print Length: 212 pages
  • Publisher: McFarland (March 21, 2007)
  • Publication Date: March 21, 2007
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B002UNMCUQ
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Not Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #408,091 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images or tell us about a lower price?

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Samantha Glasser VINE VOICE on April 30, 2007
Format: Paperback
Olive Thomas is a mystery in modern times to those who are familiar with her story. She began on the Ziegfeld stage as one of the most talked about beauties. Her looks led her to the silver screen where she was hailed as the princess of Selznick Studios. She married into Hollywood royalty when she wed rambunctious Jack Pickford who eventually was the only source for clues to her demise. Thomas died at age 25 thanks to swallowing mercury bichloride pills in a Paris hotel during their second honeymoon. Whether this was a suicide, a murder, or an accident is left to history.

Also included at the end of Olive's story is a filmography for her career including synopsis, cast lists, and the status of the film today.

One major flaw with this book is that Vogel seems unfocused. There is a lot of information about Jack Pickford and Marilyn Miller, information that really has little to do with Thomas. The story jumps around chronologically and suggests many different conclusions to Thomas' death, but no solid explanation. Also, her early life is barely touched upon; her stage and screen career and early death are the focus. Granted, the information is valuable because so little is available, but the format of the book is disappointing, especially for its price. Vogel seemingly did not intend to create the definitive biography on Thomas as she often isolates her information to a time period. She references the "recent" release of The Flapper on DVD and has a fascination with translating dollar amounts into modern prices.

This book is certainly entertaining, though brief, but hardly stands as a worthy evaluation of Olive Thomas' career.
2 Comments 30 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I was extremely disappointed in this biography. Little of Olive's early life and the development of her personality is touched on. Granted, there isn't much material out there to draw on, so I am sympathetic to the author's attempt to write a definitive biography of this interesting young woman. However, why this book is so expensive is beyond me. I was left with absolutely no new knowledge or insight into what made (and still makes) Olive such a fascinating study. It would have been more apt to title the book: The DEATH of a Silent Film Beauty. Building a biography around the mystique of her death is not my idea of time or money well spent.
Comment 19 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
While I agree that a book length biography of Olive Thomas was long overdue, I found myself disappointed with this book. I hoped that there would be a more in-depth look at Olive's early life, but it was quickly skimmed over while her career in the Ziegfeld Follies was barely discussed. Furthermore, the author arrived at the story of Olive's mysterious death before page 100.

Maybe it isn't possible to delve any further into Olive's story, but I don't think that's true. This book is a good start, but it's not the definitive biography of the tragic Olive Thomas. Since her death was the main focus of this book, it should have been titled "The Death of a Silent Screen Beauty."

However, if you are interested in the history of early Hollywood, check this book out.
Comment 16 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I bought this book after reading a fictionalized biography told by the ghost of Olive Thomas called The Forgotten Flapper. Up till then I'd never heard of her and since I enjoyed that book so much I naturally wanted too read a real biography of her. Well, this book is pretty dull. It contains almost nothing of her early days and very little about her time with the Follies. This book is mainly comprised of newspaper and magazine stories of her death. How many times can you read about the same event? It touches lightly on the sightings of Olive's ghost in the theater where the Follies were held. Then it ends with a listing of all her films in exhaustive detail, almost none of which are still in existence. Overall, a very dull account of a young woman who lead a lively life.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Despite the hefty price tag (which I'll address later), I enjoyed this book and appreciated the fact that someone decided to take on Olive Thomas who until recently had been pretty much abandoned by film historians.
My interest in Olive was the result of watching a DVD set of some of her films several months back. While Olive clearly predates her later sisters in the liberated, carefree woman mode she certainly got in on that franchise during her short career which only last about five years and ended permanently one month shy of her 26th birthday.
This book provides only the flimsiest of details regarding Olive's youth growing up in Charleroi PA, a mining town near Pittsburgh. Frankly, lack of details about her early life wasn't all that surprising. Olive's been dead for nine plus decades and I doubt that there is anyone around who would have first hand information in this area. This book supplies the basics, but truthfully Olive's story doesn't heat up until she divorces her first husband and moves to NYC and is recommended to Flo Ziegfeld who eventually features her in a somewhat risque version of his Follies known as the Midnight Frolics. Signed to a contract to make movies for Selznick Films (not to be confused with David L. Selznick's movie company as this company was owned by Selznick's father, Lewis), Olive goes through several movie contracts never really staying too long at any studio. Despite an early affair with the married Ziegfeld, Olive meets and marries silent screen phenomena Mary Pickford' s younger only brother Jack. Their marriage is an odd union to put it mildly. The comments of those who knew them offer consistency in the consensus view that they were more like playmates, or more aptly, two little petulant children hanging around with one another.
Read more ›
1 Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Olive Thomas: The Life and Death of a Silent Film Beauty
Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more about Amazon Giveaway
This item: Olive Thomas: The Life and Death of a Silent Film Beauty