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One Man, One Cow, One Planet

4.7 out of 5 stars 28 customer reviews

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(Nov 09, 2009)
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Editorial Reviews

What does an environmentally sustainable food system that is capable of feeding everyone actually look like? This award-winning film exposes globalization and the mantra of infinite growth for what it really is: an environmental and human disaster. But through the teachings of an elderly New Zealander, Indian farmers are saving their poisoned lands and exposing the bio-colonialism of multinational corporations.

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Product Details

  • Directors: Thomas Burstyn, Barbara Burstyn
  • Producers: Thomas Burstyn, Barbara Burstyn
  • Format: NTSC
  • Region: All Regions
  • Studio: Cloud South Films
  • DVD Release Date: November 9, 2009
  • Run Time: 50 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (28 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B002W6ZHVM
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #861,370 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD
One man takes on a dying planet. Simple, heart felt and inspired. Peter Proctor is a gentle man that quietly goes about the business of changing the way we farm. The dead soil of India, stripped of it's nutrients by harsh fertilizers and pesticides is turned back into rich earth though the practice of Biodynamic farming. Dying land and desperate farmers are saved by this unlikely hero. The film is beautifully written and photographed and well worth a look.
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Format: DVD
After seeing this film, we immediately started a recycle bin and compost pile. So far, we've used the organic material in our garden and have had a great year of veggies. It's a wonderful feeling. And it's a great film. Can't wait for the sequel. We have shared this with all our friends.
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Format: DVD
This is a fine, instructive, very moving film. It demonstrates graphically and clearly how biodynamic agriculture is a practical, safe, cheap, alternative to industrial chemicals and pesticides. It's wonderful to know that such people exist. They need to be nominated for sainthood.
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Format: DVD
This is a beautiful film that shows an inspiring journey of Peter Proctor, whom many call "the father of biodynamics." The film follows him on an mission to India to help farmers who have been severely taken advantage of by Monsanto and its so-called "green revolution." It's amazing to see how one man can offer so much help, knowledge, and heartfulness to so many others. He travels to countless Indian farms and teaches them some biodynamic principles to help them get their farms turned around and back to being self-sufficient. You can't help but feel called to go plant a garden after seeing this wonderfully inspiring film.
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Format: DVD
Just the word "agriculture" is enough to make most people glaze over, but this film charmingly explains one of the most potentially arcane subjects of all, BIODYNAMIC agriculture. This is a farming system that descends from the ideas of the great poet and thinker Goethe, sows plants by the phases of the moon, and advocates the burial of compost in cow horns. The film shows how it all makes sense, even to those of us who are hopelessly urban, and it also shows how this system of farming has the potential to create a true Green Evolution. Wonderful characters. Beautifully filmed.
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Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Amidst the destruction of our environment and the tyranny of the corporate model, where Monsanto and Syngenta monopolize the seeds, genetically transformed to resist their pesticides (see also [The World According to Monsanto (US NTSC Format)), it is wonderful to watch this documentary. Biodynamic farming moves away from the corporate model of junk food, and offers food that is healthy to grow, healthy for the environment and healthy to eat. It is definitively a feel-good movie for those who are really concerned about the fate of the Earth.

Peter Proctor is one of my heroes. After traveling 25 times to India in 15 years, he finally decides to leave his home country New Zealand and settle there, where he will continue teaching biodynamic farming for the remainder of his days. He says : "In biodynamics, the flow of energy is reserved. It is a profound local alternative to the corporate model of globalization that is incapable of addressing the human need we all share for self-realization and self-determination."

He is profoundly influenced by Gandhi, who said : "True democracy cannot be worked by twenty men sitting at the center. It has to be worked from below by the people of every village". At the moment of filming Maharashtra officially had 1.000 organic and biodynamic training programs and more than 4 millions ha under organic or biodynamic cultivation. And this movement continues to expand very rapidly.
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Format: DVD
Having understood the cutthroat commercialism/non ethics in certain agri/dairy farming practices in India, I was seriously contemplating on how to make a change to at least a small sector down south in India by doing this in the right manner. Came across this documentary on bio dynamic practice,where I saw Peter's involvement on such a cause. This DVD is a must have for anyone(in my case not even a farmer/farming background) who is planning to make a difference to the society and even for people with commercial aspirations in the field of medium to large scale farming.
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Format: Amazon Video Verified Purchase
First, just to be clear, I grew up farming. I'm very involved in the support and advocacy of sustainable, clean, and local food and farming. I keep an urban garden and a small but very functional compost operation. I contribute financially to several like minded organizations and sit on a few of their boards. I shop at the organic and farmers markets, blah, blah. You get the idea. However, I somewhat disagree with advocating biodynamic practices, at least here in the US. The ONLY reason I feel this way is because many of the "mystical" processes involved are ripe for slander by those inclined to slander or otherwise resist ANY change to the current industrial food chain. I fear these biodynamic detractors may then attempt to lump more...let's call them, "evidenced-based" practices into the same discussion and attempt to cast a negative light on a broader movement that is growing and has a real chance of success here in the US. I'm pretty sure if I told the average farmer in my hometown (like my dad) to fill a lactating cow's horn with her own dung and bury it in his field over the winter, I could expect to be promptly escorted to the front gate. And I'm sure Monsanto would relish the opportunity to very publicly point out that these are the types of practices preached by ALL modern sustainable farmers and make us all look ...well, a little silly in the eyes of legislators, decision makers, and the average consumer. I can hear it now, "You think these dung worshipers can feed the world?!?!?".

But please don't get me wrong, biodynamic farming is great! I'm sure the cow horn thing works just fine as a compost technique; I just don't find it to be necessary to achieve the desired results and Peter's explanation in the film of how it works is anything but scientific or even logical.
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