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For One More Day Preloaded Digital Audio Player – April, 2007

4.4 out of 5 stars 992 customer reviews

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--This text refers to the Mass Market Paperback edition.

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Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

In Albom's, second novel, retired baseball player Charley "Chick" Benetto—facing the pain of unfulfilled ambitions, alcohol abuse, divorce, and estrangement from a grown daughter—returns to his abandoned childhood home and attempts suicide in a bungling fit of rage. He encounters the spirit of his deceased mother, Pauline "Posey" Benetto, who Chick thoughtlessly took for granted during both his formative years as cocky athlete and his booze-soaked adulthood. Miraculously, Chick can now apologize to Posey for his ingratitude concerning the sacrifices she made as a single, working mother. Albom narrates with finesse, particularly in Chick's wistful litany of his mother's pearls of wisdom, "A child embarrassed by his mother is just a child who hasn't lived long enough." If Posey's truisms may not necessarily break new literary ground, Albom deserves credit for giving her depth and complexity that transcend familiar pop culture notions of motherhood in '50s America. The gentle strumming of musical accompaniment befits Albom's brand of writing. This "ghost story" provides an affirming tale of moral instruction and emotional catharsis. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

Mitch Albom sees the magical in the ordinary Cecilia Ahern Mitch Albom, in this new book, once again demonstrates why he is one of my favourite writers ... FOR ONE MORE DAY will make you smile. It will make you wistful. It will make you blink back tears of nostalgia James McBride, author of THE COLOR OF WATER Another very touching page-turner STAR magazine A warm and tender tale IRISH EVENING HERALD --This text refers to the Mass Market Paperback edition.
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Product Details

  • Preloaded Digital Audio Player
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1598953826
  • ISBN-13: 978-1598953824
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 5.2 x 7.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (992 customer reviews)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
Mitch Albom pays homage to all mothers with this novel that beautifully shows the enduring power of a mother's love, a love so strong it can transcend even death. The moral of the story is not particularly original and not even handled in a unique way. But, grab the hankies and prepare to spend several hours reminiscing along with Chick Benetto about the things you wish you had done better with your own mother. Chick Benetto has hit rock bottom---divorced, alcoholic, has-been baseball player, and now comes the ultimate slap-in-the-face---his beloved daughter does not invite him to her wedding. After being shut out of the biggest day in his only child's life, Chick sees no point in continuing his miserable life and attempts suicide. But for his suicide he is drawn once again to Pepperville Beach, to the modest home where he grew up with his mom, dad, and sister. That is, until his dad deserted the family and life changed dramatically. The surprise for Chick is that his mom is still in the house. Intellectually, he knows she died ten years ago but here she is---cooking his food, sharing stories, giving advice.

The reader learns about all the times Chick's mom stood up for him and all the times he let her down. The writing is smooth and poignant, the memories both joyful and sad. If you have lost your own parents, the words will be doubly sad. But Chick has been given a very special gift: he learns that when someone is in your heart, they're never truly gone and they can come back to you, even at unlikely times. Chick has the unheard of luxury of being able to spend just one more day with his mother, having the chance to ask questions about things that have bothered him, finding out at last why his father left, and much more. How does it happen?
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Format: Hardcover
The first line I underlined when I started this book was: EVERY FAMILY IS A GHOST STORY. THE DEAD SIT AT OUR TABLES LONG AFTER THEY HAVE GONE.

The last line(s) I underlined at the end of the book were:

SHARING TALES OF THOSE WE'VE LOST IS HOW WE KEEP FROM REALLY LOSING THEM. ONE DAY SPENT WITH SOMEONE YOU LOVE CAN CHANGE EVERYTHING.

And so...based on these lines...you can get a feel for how any one person will relate if they've ever lost a loved one. I, personally, liked his TUESDAYS WITH MORRIE book much better--but this is worthy of reading just to find the precious lines within. ;)
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Format: Hardcover
By far, "Five People" is my favorite Mitch Albom book, but this book is worth a read. The other negative reviewers are missing the point, I think. Yes, the main character is a deflated, defeated, shell of a man, but that is precisely the point. The man is no hero....but again that is the crux of the story....how many of us are heroes? How many of us would like to reflect on our lives and maybe try and see things more clearly, try to better understand the choices we made, and the choices the people closest to us made? To understand the sacrifices people make for love?

Read the book, and then call your mother....if possible....if not, make peace in your heart..this book will help you do that.
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Format: Hardcover
One More Day is an American Fable, and I mean that in the best of ways. This "as told to me" tale is poignant and tender and perhaps a bit too story-ish, but that's what it is--a good story with a good meaning. Not every book has this intention, but this does, so I accepted the terms and kept reading.

Chick Bennito's life has spun wildly out of control. He's lost everything, decides to end it all and finds himself in a surreal place where he and his mother get one more day.

Who would not ask for one more day--to understand, forgive, and make right what time and life has unraveled? I closed the book and did some thinking.
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Format: Hardcover
Mitch Albom is the author of "Tuesdays with Morrie" and "The Five People You Meet in Heaven". This book, as the others, is a fable-of-sorts; that is, a story that carries with it a meaning that goes beyond the ordinary.

This small novel (do we still use the term novella?) presents the story of a life that gets sidetracked and how intervention of a spiritual nature can restore it to equilibrium. The plot concerns a former professional baseball player whose life scrapes bottom. His family leaves him, his career dries up, and he is left with the inadequate consolation one can find in a bottle. At the moment of crisis, he is visited by his dead mother, who takes him on a journey of discovery about his life, his parents' lives, and the lives of others whose story intersects with his story.

We may tend to raise an eyebrow at the idea of a visit from "beyond"; however, in this, the reader is reminded of those spirit visitors to Ebenezer Scrooge in Charles Dickens's "A Christmas Carol". In many ways, both that small classic and the film "It's a Wonderful Life" serve as counterpoint to this book.

It would be unfair to spoil the potential reader's enjoyment of the book by disclosing anything more of the plot, but suffice it to say that if entered into in this attitude, the reader may gain helpful points to ponder. Indeed, the book could very well serve as a springboard for discussion about the value of an individual's life to those around him or her, and the influence that people from our past can have on our thoughts and actions.

However, some of the concepts that are developed in the book may make it seem more a "new age" kind of a novel.
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