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One Mountain

4.2 out of 5 stars 35 customer reviews

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9780451231192
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  • In a single two-day period, eleven climber lost their lives on K2. In a mystery clouded by haze and exhaustion, thin air and poor communication we are left to wonder:. What happened on August 1-2, 2008?.
  • With an insider’s knowledge of Himalayan climbing, Wilkinson goes deep into the lives of the climbers and particularly the Sherpas on this fateful climb to produce a book that should be essential reading for those wanting to understand the disaster. From the very start I found One Mountain Thousand Summits riveting – Conrad Anker, Coauthor of The Last Explorer: Finding Mallory on Everest.. Hardcover; 352 pages.
  • 9.2 x 6.3 x 1.2 in..
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One Mountain Thousand Summits explores the untold story of tragedy and True Heroism on K2.

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  • ASIN: B01J65C4GC
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (35 customer reviews)
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By Janice Sacherer on July 20, 2010
Size: One SizeColor: 9780451231192 Verified Purchase
Freddie Wilkinson should be highly commended for writing a book about a mountaineering tragedy from the climbing Sherpa's point of view. There are other books on the market which deal with the K2 tragedy, but this is the only one which focusses on the locals involved. In fact, in nearly a hundred years of Himalayan climbing, it is only one of three books to look at that enterprise from the Sherpa point of view.

As others have mentioned, it is also well written, insightful, ironic, and done from the perspective of someone who climbs and knows the right questions to ask. We can only hope that this book will start a new trend in mountaineering literature and that the indigenous people who do most of the work and account for the ultimate success of nearly every expedition, will finally begin to receive the credit they deserve. Fortunately, Wilkinson has set a high standard in this regard.

My only quibble is that a number of the sources, including my own on the Sherpas of Rolwaling, could have been better documented. If a person's research is worth mentioning, then so is the correct reference.

Meanwhile, congratulations to Freddie Wilkinson from whom we hope to see more good books in the future.

Jan Sacherer
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Size: One SizeColor: 9780451231192
Freddie Wilkinson's personal alpine climbing and mountaineering experience add a layer of credibility, understanding and explanation to this perspective of one of mountaineering's deadliest moments. Told from an inclusive background with interviews from sources both Sherpa and Western, it gives the full perspective. Must read.
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I will be entirely honest, I picked up this book with a hint of skepticism in my brow. I love the mountains but I have never loved climbing literature. This book not only tells the compelling story of the 2008 tragedy on K2 but it boldly explores the multidimensional worlds of climbing, international relations and the media. Wilkinson does a magnificent job of gracefully transitioning between thoughtful explanations of elaborate climbing scenarios and carefully detailing the relationships, infrastructure and social constructs that have grown from the pursuit of big mountain climbing. If you lust after high altitude adventure...If you are curious about the economic impact of tourism in third world nations...If you have ever found yourself in a unique leadership position this book will resonate with you.

Lastly, I encourage you to read slowly and look for the flashes of "pure Freddie" scattered throughout the book. Mr. Wilkinson's humor and zest for life are presence in terrific one liners throughout the novel.

BUY THIS BOOK!
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Size: One SizeColor: 9780451231192
The mountaineer author tells the story of the 2008 K2 tragedy in two sections - one the story of how the story broke on the internet and in the media, the other focusing on the heroes including Gerard McDonnell, Pemba Gyalje, Tsering (Chhiring) Bhote, and Big Pasang Bhote. There are 8 pages of bw photos and two climbing routes.

Wilco van Rooijen, the leader of the Dutch Norit expedition, used his satellite phone to call in live updates to both his internet webmaster Marten van Eck and his wife Heleen on summit day and as the tragedy unfolded. Initially using the Norit website, the media frenzy started looking for more information fed from other blogs and people at K2 Base Camp. Where the Norit website was cautious in giving out only verified information, some of the other blogs and people gave more information, including speculation and rumours on what was happening. This fueled some misinformation as the story continued to unfold, "until the spin itself threatened to taint the survivors' recollections and the factual evidence at hand." We also acutely feel the worry of those at home vigilantly watching the internet for any word of their loved ones.

For the second half of the book, the author interviewed many of the western survivors and travelled to Kathmandu several times to interview the surviving Sherpas to piece together the story. What he discovered was the selfless heroism that shone through the tragedy.

Gerard McDonnell selflessly worked for many hours to free two Koreans and Jumik Bhote who were tangled in ropes on the Traverse, only to be swept to his death when an ice avalanche from the serac hit him descending the Traverse.
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This book kept me up for five nights in a row. It explores perspectives that are seldom discussed in the 8,000 meter peak climbing world -- those of the porters and Sherpas -- but it does it honestly, not through rose colored glasses. It makes clear the ridiculousness of the atmosphere surrounding high altitude mountaineering, extreme peak bagging and the media that follow it. And it is written from a climber's perspective, and Wilkinson asks questions only a climber would ask, but he breaks things down so any armchair mountaineer can understand the nuances. If you like adventure buy this book; you won't be disappointed.
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Format: Hardcover
"One Mountain Thousand Summits" is an informative look at the modern mountain-climbing industry through the lens of an experienced mountain climber himself. It used to be that summitting Everest or any 8,000 meter plus mountain was an act of tremendous courage, endurance, and talent. Individuals would need to train for decades, planning meticulously while honing their skills before even making such an attempt. The few who for whatever reason found purpose and love in mountain-climbing were truly a band of brothers, and the history of mountain-climbing is filled with acts of heroism and sacrifice, individuals wounded and disabled who would sacrifice their own lives so that their teammates may live. Mountain-climbing was a team sport, where if an individual from the team summitted the team considered itself triumphant.

The modern-day mountain-climbing industry is a different animal altogether. Nowadays, with modern technology and the development of the industry, anyone who is reasonably fit and wealthy can attempt to summit Everest and even K2, its deadlier brother. "One Mountain Thousand Summits" is an attempt to explain the 2008 K-2 expedition where 11 people were killed. There were a litany of reasons why the expedition went so wrong: the lack of inexperience and ability of many who tried to summit, the cross-cultural conflicts and misunderstandings that inevitably arise when you have so many teams together, the individual ego, the lack of planning and co-ordination and communication. There were a lot of heroism on the K-2 expedition, but it was heroism that was caused by the selfishness and narrow-mindedness of many on that expedition.
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