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One Sunday Morning: A Novel Hardcover – April 26, 2005

3.6 out of 5 stars 16 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

*Starred Review* If Ephron has yet to establish a devoted readership--she has written two stiletto-precise historical novels (A Cup of Tea, 1997, and White Rose,1999)--her third should certainly do the trick. It meets the beautiful standards set by its predecessors; all of them are presented in brief but not undeveloped chapters, are told in language mesmerizing for its simultaneous punch and brevity, and provide sharply drafted pictures of social conventions and out-of-bounds romantic entanglements in the U.S. of yesterday. The time period Ephron has selected here is the 1920s; her chosen settings are New York and Paris. It's the Jazz Age in cities where old traditions still rise, as imposing as the mansions lining Fifth Avenue, but also where new views and different modes of behavior have blossomed in the wake of the recent world war. Through the prism of the lives of four well-heeled, socially connected women friends, Ephron casts a subtle drama arising from this conflict between old behavior and new, as scandal threatens to ruin the reputation of one of the women. This is Edith Wharton territory, and although it is not rendered quite as profoundly as the work of that master, it is, perhaps, rendered more sprucely, in a style more compelling to contemporary readers. Brad Hooper
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Review

“Ephron maintains the suspense through this evocative, smartly paced novel of romantic intrigue.” (People)

“Ephron writes beautifully . . . a Jazz Age take on Sex and the City.” (Entertainment Weekly)

“Ephron has written another historical novel destined to please her fans. . . . it will entertain you.” (Seattle Times)

“A jewel of a book.” (Reader's Digest)

“Amy Ephron is our Edith Wharton. . . . [she] is a master storyteller” (Bookreporter.com)

“An exquisite, Edith Wharton-esque novel” (Newhouse News Service)

“Book clubs will treasure the precisely rendered atmosphere in this jewel of a novel.” (Chattanooga Times Free Press)

“An elegant fable . . . a charming package, a smooth blend of period romance and contemporary wisdom.” (Miami Herald)
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 224 pages
  • Publisher: William Morrow (April 26, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0060585528
  • ISBN-13: 978-0060585525
  • Product Dimensions: 5.1 x 0.9 x 7.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,177,284 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
If Edith Wharton were alive and writing now, who would she be? Dominick Dunne is the first novelist who comes to mind, especially his first few novels. But Dunne's books are, more often than not, jump-started by a crime; for Wharton, a social gaffe was sufficient to fuel a plot. And Wharton's books were rich in subplots and subtext.

You could, I think, make the case that Amy Ephron is our Wharton. This seems, on the surface, improbable. Ephron lives in Los Angeles, where roots do not run deep and Society goes back only a handful of generations. She has worked --- gasp --- in the movie business, where people with a provenance rarely venture. And she writes novels that are painfully short: ONE SUNDAY MORNING runs to 214 pages only because the book is small and the margins are vast.

What Ephron shares with Wharton: Her books are not so much written as carved. Every word counts. And, like Wharton, every word is about the story --- there are no digressions, no riding of an authorial hobbyhorse. And, like Wharton, Ephron is concerned how a small event can be inflated into a large one.

In ONE SUNDAY MORNING, the event is a view from the window of a Gramercy Park townhouse: young Lizzie Carswell leaving a hotel in broad daylight with Billy Holmes, a man engaged to one of her friends. Lizzie's mother had to go abroad because of a scandal; have mom's degenerate genes been passed on? And what will Clara Hart, Billy's intended, do when she hears the news (as she most assuredly will)?

Wharton material, to be sure. But there's a tension here you wouldn't find in a Wharton novel --- the story is set in 1927, and so, very much bubbling under the Society plot, is the reckless mood of that era. Alcohol. Drugs. Homosexuality.
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Format: Hardcover
While hardly the heady stuff of Edith Wharton, this charming novella (it's really too brief to be classified as a novel) is perfect summer reading. The female characters are precisely drawn though I could wish she'd opted for more depth and a more lengthy story. All in all, very enjoyable -- takes no more than a couple of hours to read!
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Format: Hardcover
One Sunday Morning like Amy Epron's earlier book A Cup of Tea provides readers with a look at society life from many years ago. This is a way too short book which enveloped me from the very first page.

The sighting of an innocent woman leaving a hotel one Sunday morning sets off a chain of events and false perceptions in the days before the Depression no one could have predicted. Evoking the era of the Jazz age and those heady days of Jay Gatsby, it as if Edith Wharton met the women from Sex and the City. When it comes to historical fiction and the pulse of Manhattan society in those days, nobody does it better than Amy Ephron.

I highly recommend this book and look forward to this talented author's next book.
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Format: Hardcover
I read Ms. Ephron's 'A Cup of Tea' and really enjoyed it, and I wasn't disappointed with 'One Sunday Morning'. It did seem to go a bit slower than 'Cup of Tea'...but it was a good read nonetheless.

This book only took me a couple hours to get through, and held my attention the entire time. Granted you don't find out the meaning of everything until literally the last two pages, but your need to know keeps you turning them.

I can't say the character's were very well developed, or that the story had much meat to it, but keep in mind...it's a tiny little book that's more for passing the time then challenging the mind.

Overall I definitely recommend this if your looking for a light, quick read on a nice day, or if your in between books, and are looking for a filler. Ms. Epheron sure knows how to tell a good short story, and I'll absolutely be keeping an eye out for her future work.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This was an average story at best with no real wrap up.
Maybe this is the real crux of my issue. As with a previous Amy Ephron story; Cup of Tea, she just ends the book. It does not seem like a natural ending. It just ended. To me it just seemed like a chapter or two was missing. This might be a new technique, but I don't like it.

The story itself was average, a tale of gossip among some relatively well to do society young people, in a time when who and where you were seen mattered more, than what was the back story...oh wait that's still true. But, it was a time when judgements were harsher on women and innuendo could ruin lives. Without ruining the story, things are not all what they seem and at worst, at the end, you're still not sure what was going on. Or I could be dense.

The pity of it is, Amy Ephron is a great writer, the story flows. It's just the story is lacking.

Given this was my second Amy Ephron book, after reading the wonderful Loose Diamonds, I will stick to her newer stuff.
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Format: Hardcover
I found this book on the table of the bookstore and finished it within a span of two days. I loved it! It's about socialites in the 1920s in New York, and they take a trip to Paris. It's very minimalistic and great. I love the scenes set in Paris. There's a fabulous scene where one of the girls walks the Champs-Elysee and I swear I almost cried. It's like I know the girls. Even though it's the 1920s, I found so many comparisons to today's culture, the way that today we're up against a conservative backlash in the country not unlike prohibition and the way that people still talk behind each other's backs, and the way that things aren't always as they seem. Highly recommend this book!!
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