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Comment: Clean white pages with no writing or marks. No page creases. Small speck stain on top page edge. Tight binding. Cover has small curl & light scuffing. Ships directly from Amazon.
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Orvis Guide to Fly Fishing for Coastal Gamefish Paperback – May 1, 2012

5.0 out of 5 stars 5 customer reviews

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Frequently Bought Together

  • Orvis Guide to Fly Fishing for Coastal Gamefish
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  • Fly Fisherman's Guide to Saltwater Prey: How to Match Coastal Prey Fish & Invertebrates with the Fly Patterns That Imitate Them
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  • The Orvis Guide to Beginning Saltwater Fly Fishing: 101 Tips for the Absolute Beginner (Orvis Guides)
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Editorial Reviews

About the Author

For Aaron Adams, the line between science and fishing blurred long ago, and Adams uses his fish research to formulate his fishing strategies, and his fishing to help guide some of his research. Adams has a Ph.D. in environmental biology, holds a Coast Guard Captain’s license, and has lived, worked, and fished in Maryland, North Carolina, California, Virginia, the U.S. Virgin Islands, Massachusetts, and Florida, and conducted fish research throughout the Caribbean. He is presently a Senior Scientist at Mote Marine Laboratory and Director of Operations for the non-profit Bonefish & Tarpon Trust.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

(from Chapter 6: Oyster Bars)

My favorite series of oyster bars lies in knee-deep water along the deep edge of a large, shallow grass bed. The oyster bars protect the grass bed from waves that build under south winds whipping across two miles of open water. These disconnected patches of oyster bar also break up incoming tidal currents whose diversions have carved small sand potholes, about five feet across, at the ends of the bars. Baitfish will temporarily congregate in the shelter provided by the oyster bars, taking refuge from the forceful currents and seeking escape from foraging gamefish.

Unfortunately for the schooling baitfish, the oyster bars render a false haven. At low tide the shallow oyster bars provide shelter from gamefish, but the baitfish are at the mercy of wading birds like blue heron. At high tide, when water covers the bars, this is an easy place for gamefish to corral and feed on the baitfish because of the bars= proximity to deeper water. I have witnessed snook, tarpon, red drum, and spotted seatrout feeding on sardines, mullet, and anchovies that have sought shelter in the shadows of these oyster bars. When the baitfish and gamefish are both present, an appropriately sized streamer cast into the mix almost always results in a strike.

In contrast, a whole community of potential gamefish prey lives permanently among the oyster shells, and takes advantage of food and shelter provided by oyster bars= many crevices. These residents seem to live a less frantic existence than the baitfish. When gamefish feed on the resident prey their feeding is more methodical, and your fly fishing approach must follow suit. This chapter will introduce you to the intricacies of oyster bars so you can interpret how these habitats are used by gamefish, and devise strategies for fishing these habitats at different tides, locations, and times of year.

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Product Details

  • Series: Orvis
  • Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Lyons Press (May 1, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0762779128
  • ISBN-13: 978-0762779123
  • Product Dimensions: 5.9 x 0.9 x 8.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #79,414 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Excellent book with lots of info, but with a somewhat heavier biologic approach that may scare some flyfisherman. For me, that love fishing, fish and biology since I learned to walk and hold a stick, it was pure joy to finally find information backed up by a science background. Very well written with fluid text that keep your attention focused and the central idea very well defined.

Although short, the best and most solid and comprehensive discussion about fish vision and color perception I ever seen in the fly fishing realm. Excellent discussion of all the fish sensory and how it should be used as a guide do tie flies and use them in order to improve the chances of catching gamefish. And all this as a "brief" introductory to the coastal ecosystems.

From there on the chapters dive into each ecosystem alone, providing loads of info in each of them. A cover to cover non-stop read.

This is not a begginers book: it's THE book to read if you want to have some fun catching coastal fish, whatever your experience in coastal flyfishing. A no mistake purchase.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
A great deal of the information was related to the east coast of the United States and down into the Caribbean which made it difficult to relate all the information to California where I have lived previously and Okinawa, where I live now. The information was great, delivered very well. Almost exactly what I wanted. Can't wait to go back and fish the east coast now! I think all saltwater fly anglers should read this.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Excellent guide to Coastal fishing for the fly fisherman or for any fisherman. A very comprehensive approach to the habitat and the species that live and hunt within the various environments. Allows the fly fisherman to target the species based on knowledge process. Well worth the price.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is an updated version of Dr. Adams' book "Fly Fisherman's Guide to Saltwater Prey" An excellant resource for fly fishermen who fish the salt.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Great product.
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