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The Other Women's Movement: Workplace Justice and Social Rights in Modern America (Politics and Society in Twentieth-Century America) Hardcover – November 23, 2003

3.0 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews

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Winner of the 2005 - 28th Annual Philip Taft Labor History Award, International Association of Labour History Institutions



Honorable Mention for the 2004 Gustavus Myers Outstanding Book Award, Gustavus Myers Center for the Study of Bigotry and Human Rights



One of Choice's Outstanding Academic Titles for 2004


"This [book] . . . shows the results of prodigious research. . . . Cobble believes that labor feminism learned from second-wave feminism and that later the new feminism learned from the old. She outlines steps that must be taken for labor feminism to be revitalized."--Library Journal



"Dorothy Sue Cobble has recovered . . . a feminist legacy that in its embrace of female difference refused to conform to 'men's ways.' She provides a usable past for those of us who wish to revalue women's labors. . . . Cobble's stunning reinterpretation persuasively shows that we've been looking in the wrong place for a mass movement after suffrage and before women's liberation. She names this movement 'labor feminism.'"--Eileen Boris, Women's Review of Books



"A rich contribution to the history of American women and American labor from the 1930s to the 1980s."--Choice



"In this meticulously documented and richly characterized book . . . [Cobble] provides a detailed and lively account . . . of the aspirations of an often-overlooked movement within what is commonly considered a monolithic American [feminism]."--Harvard Civil Rights-Civil Liberties Law Review



"[A] sweeping new history of working-class feminism. . . . Future studies of post-World War II labor activism, politics, and feminism will build on this crucial work."--Annelise Orleck, Reviews in American History



"Meticulously researched and beautifully written. The kind of history that causes us radically to rethink what we thought we knew about the relationship between feminism and social class. We cannot afford to ignore the lessons of the past she so cogently analyzes for today's activists and scholars."--Mary Margaret Fonow, British Journal Of Industrial Relations



"[A] remarkable . . . fascinating new history of the 'other,' forgotten feminism."--Sarah Blustain, The American Prospect



"The unheralded advocacy and pivotal role of working-class women in the labor movement in the decades following the Depression are illuminated for the first time in this work. . . . . This book scrutinizes intersections and divergences in the history of the labor movement and American feminism."--Noteworthy Books in Industrial Relations and Labor Economics, Firestone Library, Princeton



"Dorothy Sue Cobble's book is a tour de force of feminist historical research and scholarship."--Sue Ledwith, Industrial Relations Journal

From the Publisher

Winner of the 28th Annual 2005 Philip Taft Labor History Award, International Association of Labour History Institutions Honorable Mention for the 2004 Gustavus Myers Outstanding Book Award, Gustavus Myers Center for the Study of Bigotry and Human Rights One of Choice's Outstanding Academic Titles for 2004. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.
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Product Details

  • Series: Politics and Society in Twentieth-Century America
  • Hardcover: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Princeton University Press (November 23, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 069106993X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0691069937
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 7 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,180,543 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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By Stephen Siciliano VINE VOICE on January 30, 2009
Format: Paperback
highwayscribery wanted to tell you about "The Other Women's Movement," by a Rutgers University professor named Dorothy Sue Cobble.

The text relates specifically to organized labor and focusing on it through a patented highwayscribery "book report" maintains continuity with the previous post's theme - the Teamsters organizing victory at the L.A. Times.

The reason for reading this academic thesis was a little primary research for a screenplay dramatizing the 1964 Hotel and Restaurant Employees Union drive to organize bunnies at the Detroit Playboy Club.

The force behind this effort was a left-over from 1930s union activism, one Myra Wolfgang, "the battling belle of Detroit." A rebel woman who had helped organize the Woolworths lunch counters during the Great Depression.

Years later, she was something of a national figure to the extent women were paid attention to at all and held a position as a national vice president of the Hotel and Restaurant Employees Union.

She was old school. Betty Friedan called her an "Aunt Tom," for what she considered Wolfgang's subservience to union bosses. Wolfgang responded that Friedan was the Chamber of Commerce's Aunt Tom.

Anyway, Wolfgang sent her 17-year old daughter into the Playboy Club as a union "salt"- an insider - and began the successful drive.

She said Hugh Hefner's "Playboy Philosophy" perpetuated the notion that women should be, "Obscene and Not Heard."

That's the scribe's title. Go ahead and try to steal it, he can use the publicity.

Anyway, Cobble knows a lot about Myra Wolfgang, waitress unions, and the Playboy campaign in particular so the scribe went out and ordered her book from Princeton University Press.

It was the wrong book.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
With the emphasis today on women's rights and privileges, I sometimes worry that the reverse is true: that men are the ones being cheated. Why doesn't someone write about them?
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