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Comment: This item is in good condition. All pages and covers are readable. There are no stains or tears. Dust jacket is present if applicable. May contain small amounts of writing and/or highlighting. Spine and cover may show signs of wear. May not contain supplementary items. We ship within 1 business day. Big Hearted Books shares its profits with schools, churches and non-profit groups throughout New England. Thank you for your support!
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Outlaw Culture: Resisting Representations Paperback – September 23, 1994

4.0 out of 5 stars 14 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Turning from teaching to topical subjects like gangsta rap, censorship, date rape and Hollywood cinema, these 21 essays will enhance City College professor and political activist hooks's (Black Looks) reputation as an astute, vigorous and freewheeling critic on matters of race, class and gender. The underlying focus in many of these short, occasional pieces (many are reprinted from magazines like Spin and Art in America) is on how some groups, particularly women of color, are marginalized both in daily life and in the cultural wars over media representations and the academic curriculum. Memorable essays touch on questions of censorship inside and outside the academy, the dearth of feminist perspectives on Malcolm X, the impact of commodity culture on political debate and the shortcomings of mainstream gender theorists Camille Paglia, Naomi Wolf and Kate Roiphe. Though formulaic at times, hooks's critical style is refreshingly brash and accessible and often inflected by personal experience. Readers may contest her politics, yet few will be unmoved by the spirit that animates these essays: a desire to rethink cultural institutions that sustain racism, sexism and other systems of political oppression.
Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal

This latest collection of hooks's (Sisters of the Yam, LJ 8/93) essays does not make for comfortable reading-nor is it meant to. Cogent essays on patriarchy, violence, and racism demand that the reader reexamine familiar assumptions. The author insists that white feminists recognize that the female experience varies greatly and that class and race must therefore be used as categories of analysis. In several essays, including one on Malcolm X, she offers a feminist perspective on the position of black men in society and their attitudes toward black women. In critiques of Camille Paglia, Katie Roiphe, and Naomi Wolf, hooks describes them all as hankering back to a prefeminist time. Other essays include a discussion of violence, the myth of Columbus, and the portrayal of blacks on film. Highly recommended for collections on feminism, gender, and race.
Sharon Firestone, Ross-Blakley Law Lib., Arizona State Univ., Tempe
Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Routledge; First Edition edition (September 23, 1994)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0415908116
  • ISBN-13: 978-0415908115
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6.2 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,521,257 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
bell hooks's speaks to us, elegantly, clearly, and passionately about the culture of the margin, about disempowered people and their culture. But even more incredibly, she cuts right through crap, and fearlessly breaks things down for us, articulating truths, hopes and dreams I have never seen discussed anywhere else. bell hooks uses her keen intellect and her brilliant common sense to examine not only the materialistic and physical constraints of racist and sexist oppression, she also identifies the psychological, spiritual and emotional; individual and communal injury and trauma that is experienced. Then, she gives us hope, for revolution, for decolonization, not just of our bodies, but our minds and hearts.

Reading bell hooks, for me, is like listening to an incredibly wise and gentle girlfriend, who can both hold your hand, and beat the living hell out of anyone trying to do you wrong.
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Format: Paperback
bell hooks does an excellent job in exploring pop culture and its relationship to African Americans. I found all of the essays interesting but was particularly moved by Seduced by Violence No More in which I felt like I was slapped across the face. There are sections in that particular essay that read as if hooks had had a personal window into my life! Other essays that stood out to me included Crying Game meets The Body Guard, Misrepresenting the Black Underclass, and Censorship from Right to Left. I recommend this book to anyone interested in hearing a powerful direct view on pop culture and its effects.
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By Kesha on May 19, 2003
Format: Paperback
bell hooks does an excellent job in exploring pop culture and its relationship to African Americans. I found all of the essays interesting but was particularly moved by Seduced by Violence No More, Crying Game meets The Body Guard, Misrepresenting the Black Underclass, and Censorship from Right to Left. I recommend this book to anyone interested in hearing a powerful direct view on pop culture and its effects.
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Format: Paperback
I came across bell hooks very recently. I have found her work to be very direct and very, very challenging. Resisting Reresentations has done a lot of things to my mind. Although I consider myself "in-the-now" with ideas on social issues, after reading this book I am left with a feeling of re-birth. hooks speaks of many issues I agree with (and some I am not so sure I swallow completely). These issues and hooks' analysis of them has made me learn to laterally think and critically observe our world. I am a woman who believes in the eradication of sexism on all levels but now I must make my belief the engine to keep the eradication machine existent. Any woman, or man, who needs inspiration to challenge the many institutions that support racism, sexism and captalism start with bell hooks. She forces you to use your brain and think. This is a quality that many intellectualists fail to possess.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I've read a few of bell hooks' books and I do think she is a great thinker and writer, however, I don't think this is her best work. Overall, I did like the book, but in places it does seem like she is too defensive about conflicts she has with other famous people. It is a fine line of critiquing others, so I can't say that she was wrong or anything...I just think she undermined herself in some places. Also, this was published in 1994, so it is a bit dated although I would argue, still relevant. I guess I'm only comparing this to some of her other books, so if I was to read this without comparison I would probably think it was pretty right on and daring, because bell hooks is usually right on and daring! bell hooks does what she does best in this book--great analysis in accessible terms. You don't have to be an academic to read this, but it isn't a dumbed-down polemic either. I enjoyed the book and learned a lot. I would recommend this book, but you might also want to check out some of her other books too!
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Format: Paperback
This is certainly one amazing book. bell hooks superbly crafts her argument to truly make her readers think, to make them look at seemingly clear-cut issues in a different light. hooks shows very convincingly that there are many issues below the surface that we must explore if we are ever to have true equity and equality in our society. She cleverly exposes some of the subtle ways in which the powers that be maintain their power, sometimes deliberately, sometimes unwittingly, and she shows how the latter way is the most insidious one and does the most damage.
At the same time, hooks is not always true to her word. She demands for herself complete freedom from censorship but in her own way attempts to censor or at least discredit those women who might disagree with her. Second, I appreciate her condemnation of black violence, but following that with a "I condemn, but..."
makes one wonder about her true feelings. And in her essay on Columbus, hooks does exhibit her limited knowledge of American Indian issues. An excellent book to force readers to examine their own thoughts and actions but even better if people read between the lines and expose hooks' own prejudices.
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Format: Paperback
Cover seems almost new; highlights and marks on the margin inside. Completely fine as described but I just don't understand why someone who read through the whole book and obviously pretty carefully would want to give it away. But a read book is a loved one so I love it too. Thanks!
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