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Outlaw of Gor Paperback – June 1, 2007

4.0 out of 5 stars 59 customer reviews
Book 2 of 33 in the Gorean Saga Series

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Paperback, June 1, 2007
$22.47 $1.98
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Editorial Reviews

About the Author

John Norman is creator of the Gorean Saga, a series of novels spanning dozens of titles that began in 1967 with TARNSMAN OF GOR and that are considered to be cult classics. He has also produced a three-installment fictional series, Telnarian Histories, plus two other fiction works and a nonfiction paperback entitled IMAGINATIVE SEX. He continues to write new novels in the Gorean saga, notably WITNESS OF GOR (2002) and PRIZE OF GOR (2008), both published by E-Reads. At Gor Chronicles, a web site specially created for his tremendous fan following, one may read everything there is to know about this unique fictional culture. Mr. Norman was born in Chicago, Illinois in 1931. He is married and has three children. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 220 pages
  • Publisher: e-reads.com; 40 Anv edition (June 1, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0759283842
  • ISBN-13: 978-0759283848
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.5 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (59 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,765,507 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
I read the Gor series as a boy in the 70's and early 80's. IMHO the series is most appealing to teenage boys. I recently pulled "Assassins of Gor" off the shelf one night while bored, and re-read it. I was shocked that there was no real sex, and only a handful of pages of philosophy and psychology that I had to skip over. The book was really excellent, although in a straight forward, uncomplicated sort of way. These are escapist novels, richly detailed, which immerse you in an exotic world, not real thinkers. My enduring memories were of the later books in the series, which were almost unreadable because whole chapters were devoted to philosophy and psychology.
I am not offended by the idea that it is natural and enjoyable for women to be submissive to men. Although I recognize it as wish fulfillment fantasy, still I consider it harmless, especially in such an obviously fictitious setting. I even found it mildly interesting the first time it was mentioned. It is the umpteenth repetition that I find boring. I just turn those pages, skipping ahead to the next action sequence. Speaking of wish fulfillment, I wish someone would edit the series, and re-publish it without these parts. Maybe Eric Flint could do it? He likes to edit, according to his afterword to "1633" and he's good at it. Of course, if you take the sex out of Gor you get Barsoom, and that story has already been written.
I looked on Amazon to see if there was anything new going on with the series, and there was. It is being reprinted, starting at the beginning, and at least 2 new books seem to be published, or at least in the works. I was disappointed though that Amazon didn't have the whole series listed under one easy to find heading. I guess there are, after all, millions of books and only so many Amazon employees.
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Format: Paperback
The first novel in John Norman's Counter-Earth Series, "Tarnsman of Gor," owed a debt to "A Princess of Mars," the first John Carter novel by Edgar Rice Burroughs. Both of the second novels in these series begin the same way, with the hero finally able to return to the distant planet where they can begin to search for the great love of their life. But after the beginning of "Outlaw of Gor" Norman abandons the parallels to Burroughs and starts to build on the elements introduced in the first novel to create his own unique world.

"Outlaw of Gor" offers a radical reintroduction to the world of Gor. Tarl Cabot is returned to the Counter-Earth seven long years after he left, only to discover that his City-State of Ko-ro-ba has been ordered destroyed by the mysterious Priest-Kings. Just as no two stones of the city are allowed to stand together neither can two citizens of the city. An Initiate, one of those who serves the Priest-Kings, orders Cabot to submit to their will, but he refuses, and heads off across Gor for the Sardar Mountains, the legendary home of the Priest-Kings. Along the way he walks into Tharna, a town ruled by women. The head woman is called the Tatrix and the ruling class of women wear silver masks. The society is sterile and unproductive and although they try to break Cabot to their will, they are not going to have any more success than the Priest-Kings.

For me "Outlaw of Gor" is the weakest of the early Counter-Earth novels, mainly because Cabot's adventures in Tharna are a detour on his war to the Sardar Mountains.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
I have read almost all of the Gorean Series. One thing that I liked about all albeit too little in some was his idea of honor, the rigidity of it at times, but the necessity of it all the time. I liked his hero at his stoic best when he was against tremendous odds. I liked the humanity of his character at times yet overall I feel he missed the mark by focusing on the man/woman - master/slave thing. He beats a dead horse into mush. If Norman had stayed true to the warrior code and the action novel I feel he could be what David Gemmell is today - One of the best of the Sword and Fantasy genre. I wish I could sit own with Mr. Norman and tell him what I liked or disliked about each book. He has the seeds of greatness like Burroughs, but seems to have fallen down a shute from which he is not willing or able to escape.
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Format: Paperback
In this, the 2nd installment of the Counter-Earth saga, Cabot is finally returned to Gor after being exiled to planet Earth for reasons unknown.
This novel, which follows "Tarnsman of Gor" picks up with Cabot back on Earth in New York city. Cabot is greatly anguished at being separated from his city Ko-Ro-Ba, and his Free Companion, Talena of Ar. We get a peek at Cabot's persona, and how unfit he is for life on Earth after his exposure to life on Gor.
Upon his return to Gor, Cabot learns that the mysterious Priest-Kings of Gor have destroyed Ko-Ro-Ba, and decreed that no two men of that city may stand together without risking the wrath of the Priest-Kings.
Cabot sets forth to enter the forbidding Sardar mountains where legend says that the rulers of Gor reside, and demand an accounting of the Priest-Kings as to why his city was destroyed and its inhabitants forced to scatter before the winds. On the way Cabot passes through the city of Tharna, and learns that sometimes you cannot accept things at face value, when he is trapped into the slavery of the silver mines of Tharna.
Cabot eventually escapes, and the novel closes with him making his preparations to enter the Sardar mountains.
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