Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Qty:1
FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
Overcoming Inventoritis: ... has been added to your Cart
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Very Good used copy: Some light wear to cover, spine and page edges. Very minimal writing or notations in margins. Text is clean and legible. Possible clean ex-library copy with their stickers and or stamps.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Overcoming Inventoritis: The Silent Killer of Innovation Paperback – February 1, 2008

3.6 out of 5 stars 5 customer reviews

See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$19.95
$19.94 $5.12

Buxfer: Online money management software
Spend wiser. Live beter. Make better spending decisions with Buxfer. Try it FREE
$19.95 FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books. Only 1 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

If you buy a new print edition of this book (or purchased one in the past), you can buy the Kindle edition for only $2.99 (Save 70%). Print edition purchase must be sold by Amazon. Learn more.
For thousands of qualifying books, your past, present, and future print-edition purchases now lets you buy the Kindle edition for $2.99 or less. (Textbooks available for $9.99 or less.)
  • Thousands of books are eligible, including current and former best sellers.
  • Look for the Kindle MatchBook icon on print and Kindle book detail pages of qualifying books. You can also see more Kindle MatchBook titles here or look up all of your Kindle MatchBook titles here.
  • Read the Kindle edition on any Kindle device or with a free Kindle Reading App.
  • Print edition must be purchased new and sold by Amazon.com.
  • Gifting of the Kindle edition at the Kindle MatchBook price is not available.
Learn more about Kindle MatchBook.


New York Times best sellers
Browse the New York Times best sellers in popular categories like Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Books and more. See more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 196 pages
  • Publisher: Happy About (February 1, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1600050417
  • ISBN-13: 978-1600050411
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.4 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #5,060,882 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Bruce Wolff on April 9, 2008
Format: Paperback
A terrific new insight into why new products / inventions succeed or fail. Roosen and Nakagawa introduce a new measure of product development spending priorities and back it up with several historical and modern examples tying these priorities to the effect on real-life products - and companies.

"Overcoming Inventoritis" goes beyond Clayton Christensen's concept of Disruptive Technology in "The Innovator's Dilemma: The Revolutionary Book that Will Change the Way You Do Business (Collins Business Essentials)". Roosen and Nakagawa show how even companies as complex and well-established as Kodak and the large integrated steel makers (the latter among Christensen's examples of supposedly doomed industries) have the ability to succeed in the face of new lower-quality but improving competitors. The key is to keep your internal strengths aligned with the market's external demands, rather than focusing internally on unguided innovation.

This strategy sounds easy. How can it be accomplished? "Overcoming Inventoritis" lays out twelve distinct ways to break with unsuccessful innovations and increase your products' chances of profitability. My favorite of the twelve? The first: Assume your product is terrible. Don't laugh - it actually makes sense the way Roosen and Nakagawa explain it.

Among many examples of inventoritis-free successes and inventoritis-plagued failures, one example from a century ago stands out. The comparison between Thomas Edison and Nikola Tesla is as clear an example of opposing attitudes toward innovation - and radically differing outcomes - as you will ever find.
Read more ›
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I read a great book by Tatsuya Nakagawa and Peter Paul Roosen called "Overcoming Inventoritis: The Silent Killer of Innovation". When Tatsuya first sent me the book, I instantly thought - SYNNEX - distribution - this must be a book on how to turn your inventory faster. Having the right inventory and turning it fast is key to any well run distributor.

But the book is about Inventors or Creativity. The gist of the thesis is all organizations need innovation to grow and thrive but all companies have built in characteristics that stifle creativity. The book covers a series of interesting case studies to point out the challenges and how some successful companies overcame the obstacles.

One clear message is "falling in love with your invention is a sure way to fail".

The book build us up to my favourite chapter (7) which has the answer. 12 ways to overcome Inventoritis.

1 - Assume the product or idea is terrible. Challenge and re-challenge.

2 - Know your customer, industry and business well. I notice that everyone else's business is easy and the grass is always greener there but when I invest, I lose money.

3 - Build a solid leadership bridge between marketing, engineering and sales.

4 - Make a commitment to self-improvement

5 - Be prepared to give up control. Control needs to be where the best good for the innovation is.

6 - Steal ideas from others and let them steal your ideas. I have always said "Ideas are a dime a dozen - implementation is what counts"

7 - Budget the time to help others and ask for help. Interesting, I am better at giving help than asking for it. Something I should work on.

8 - Lead with process.

9 - Create a slogan for the strategy.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I love the unique way this book was developed and written. The simple, easy to understand, amazing concepts discussed are very timely and will help anyone in their marketing endeavours. Highly recommended!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
First the guy never really defines Inventoritis. I guess you can kind of figure it out by reading the book, but it's really left up to the reader to define it in their own minds. Second, the examples he gives seem to contradict themselves. In one case an inventor is portrayed as being tenaciousness and in another example an inventor exhibits the same qualities and he's portrayed as having inventoritis. I did learn a bit more than about Edison than I knew before, but that's all I got out of the book.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book can be summarized in a single paragraph:

Thomas Edison was a marketer first, and an inventor second. Nicola Tesla was an inventor first, and a marketer not at all. Edison lied, cheated, and stole his way to wealth and power; Tesla was lied to, cheated, and stolen from, most notably by Edison. Therefore, Edison was right, Tesla was wrong, and your company should be more like the former.

Summarized this way, both this book's merits and its flaws should be clear -- and I just saved you twenty bucks.
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Overcoming Inventoritis: The Silent Killer of Innovation
Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more about Amazon Giveaway
This item: Overcoming Inventoritis: The Silent Killer of Innovation