Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Buy Used
$1.54
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by Hawking Books
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Very Good Condition. Five star seller - Buy with confidence!
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Overton Window Hardcover – Bargain Price, June 15, 2010

4.2 out of 5 stars 960 customer reviews
Book 1 of 2 in the Overton Window Series

See all 16 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover, Bargain Price, June 15, 2010
$2.43 $1.54

This is a bargain book and quantities are limited. Bargain books are new but could include a small mark from the publisher and an Amazon.com price sticker identifying them as such. Details
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions


Editorial Reviews

From AudioFile

Single, handsome, and charming Noah Gardner, public relations executive, was raised amid wealth and privilege. Now a 20-something whose biggest concern is his social calendar, he meets Molly Ross, who calls herself a patriot. Noah's interest in Molly is tempered by her conspiracy-theorist attitudes--until an attack on the U.S. changes his mind. James Daniels moves smoothly among various points of view in this thriller. His portrayal of America's disintegration into chaos after a terrorist attack is terrifyingly dramatic. He fully depicts Noah's confusion over what to do and whom to trust. While Daniels's delivery is consistent, the story would be better served with less politicizing. Glenn Beck narrates the foreword and the conclusion. G.D.W. © AudioFile 2010, Portland, Maine --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

CHAPTER 1

Most people think about age and experience in terms of years, but it’s really only moments that define us. We stay mostly the same and then grow up suddenly, at the turning points.

His life being pretty sweet just as it was, Noah Gardner had devoted a great deal of effort in his first twenty-something years to avoiding such defining moments at all costs.

Not that his time had gone entirely wasted. Far from it. For one thing, he’d spent a full decade building what most guys would call an outstanding record of success with the ladies. Good-looking, great job, fine education, puckishly amusing and even clever when he put his mind to it, reasonably fit and trim for an office jockey, Noah had all the bona fide credentials for a killer eHarmony profile. Since freshman year at NYU he’d rarely spent a weekend night alone; all he’d had to do was keep the bar for an evening’s companionship set at only medium-high.

As he’d rounded the corner of age twenty-seven and stared the dreaded number thirty right in the face, Noah had begun to realize something about that medium-high bar: it takes two to tango. While he’d been aiming low with his standards in the game of love, the women he’d been meeting might all have been doing exactly the same thing. Now, on his twenty-eighth birthday, he still wasn’t sure what he wanted in a woman but he knew what he didn’t want: arm candy. He was sick of it. Maybe, just maybe, it was time to consider thinking about getting serious.

It was in the midst of these deep ruminations on life and love that the woman of his dreams first caught his eye.

There was nothing remotely romantic about the surroundings or the situation. She was standing on tiptoe, reaching up high to pin a red, white, and blue flier onto a patch of open cork on the company bulletin board. And he was watching, frozen in time between the second and third digits of his afternoon selection at the snack machine.

Top psychologists tell us in Maxim magazine that the all-important first impression is set in stone within about ten seconds. That might not sound like much, but when you count it off it’s a long damn time for a guy to stare uninvited at a female coworker. By the four-second mark Noah had made three observations.

First, she was hot, but it was an aloof and effortless hotness that almost double-dared you to bring it up. Second, she wasn’t permanent staff, probably just working as a seasonal temp in the mailroom or another high-turnover department. And third, even in that lowly position, she wasn’t going to survive very long at Doyle & Merchant.

They say you should dress for the job you want, not the job you have. That’s especially true in the public relations business, considering that that’s where appearance is reality. Apparently the job this girl wanted was head greeter at the Grateful Dead Cultural Preservation Society. But that wasn’t quite right; she didn’t strike him as a wannabe hipster or a retro-sixties flower child. It was more than the clothes, it was the whole picture, the way she carried herself, like a genuine free spirit. An appealing vibe, to be sure, but there was really no place for that sort of thing—neither the outfit nor the attitude—in the buttoned-up world of top-shelf New York City PR.

At about five seconds into his first impression, something else about her struck him, and he completely lost track of time.

What struck him was a word, or, more precisely, the meaning of a word: line. More powerful than any other element of design, a line is the living soul of a piece of art. It’s the reason a simple logo can be worth tens of millions of dollars to a corporation. It’s the thing that makes you believe that a certain car, or a pair of sunglasses, or the cut of a jacket can make you into the person you want to be.

The definition he’d received from an artist friend was rendered not in words but in a picture. Just seven light strokes of a felt-tip marker on a blank white page and before his eyes had appeared the purest essence of a woman. There was nothing lewd about it, but it was the sexiest drawing Noah had ever seen in his life.

And that is what struck him. There it was at the bulletin board, that same exquisite line, from the toes of her sandals all the long, lovely way up to her fingertips. Unlikely as it must seem, he knew right then that he was in love.

© 2009 Glenn Beck

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Ghosts of War: A Pike Logan Thriller by Brad Taylor
"Ghosts of War" by Brad Taylor
World War is on the horizon in best-selling author Brad Taylor’s tenth heart-pounding Pike Logan thriller. Learn more | See related books

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Threshold Editions; 1ST PRINT edition (June 15, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1439184305
  • ASIN: B005OHVVVG
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 6.3 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (960 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,066,958 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By L. Hicken on July 8, 2010
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I am conservative, but not a major Glenn Beck fan. I figured the book would have a lot of conservative political doctrine in it, and it did. For about the first half of the book, I would have given it 2-3 stars. The attraction between Molly and Noah seemed a bit contrived and the plot seemed to be kind of meandering. I was worried it was going to be a weak book that was just written as a vehicle to preach politics.

However, about half way through (and I will not give away any spoilers) Beck starts to put the first half of the book together in a way that made me understand what he was doing. It really starts to get good. The last half was a complete page turner for me.

Also, make sure to read the afterward at the end of the book. It was interesting to know how much fact was in the book. He also discusses how facts can be twisted (even by conservatives). IE, not all the conservative spiels in the book are what Glenn himself believes.

Overall, I was very happy I read it.
4 Comments 197 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
I am writing this review, because every review on here seems to be about the author and his biases and not about the BOOK itself. Let me first say that I am an avid reader. I read everything from Stephenie Meyer to Bertrand Russell, Chuck Palahniuk to Freakonomics. I read 3-5 books per week, fiction and non-fiction alike.

I knew very little about Glenn Beck before I purchased this book. Of course I had heard his name, and that he was a radio personality, but that's about it. I read a little about him before beginning the book, learning that he is a "conservative libertarian." With that being said, it didn't really matter to me, a good book is a good book, no matter the political implications or insinuations.

About the book: The plot was weak, it could have used a lot less quoting and preaching and a lot more character development and background. I found myself being thrown into a whole lot of speeches and little narrative or story development.

The original character descriptions were good, but I found myself wanting to know more about them, who they were really, where they came from, and what they were thinking. The protagonist of this story was the only character that was explored deeper than a name, physical description, and a little about their backgrounds. I wanted to know more about them ESPECIALLY what they were thinking.

The writing was a little below average. Mr. Beck just isn't that good of a story teller, I found myself drifting through the quotes and preaching, wanting them to be over so the story could continue...which it never really did. There was never a climax in the story, and the ending left a lot to be desired.

You would have expected to learn a lot more of the elder Mr.
Read more ›
75 Comments 901 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
Not particularly liking or disliking Mr. Beck, I took a copy of this book from a co-worker with some reluctance, and it sat on my desk for several days before a trip caused me to pick it up for airplane reading. About 25 pages into the book I was hooked and finished it in a few short days. It is a great story. It is very well written. It is thought provoking. It is full of interesting facts and observations. And contrary to expectations, it is not a bashing of Democrats or a celebration of Republicans. Yes, there are political overtones but these can be dismissed, or considered, as the reader desires since this is just a great story.
Comment 48 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I am not an avid reader of novels. This is the first one that I've read in several years, actually. (I'm more of a nonfiction guy, personally.) Nonetheless, after reading Glenn Beck's nonfiction Control, I was excited to go back and try out the Overton Window, which I knew had been out for awhile. For so long, in fact, that at the time I started it Glenn was busy promoting its sequel, Eye of Moloch, on radio.

Based on the striking cover alone, I was expecting it to be about a big-government dystopia. In actuality, it is about the run up to the same. If you're a fan of Glenn's, that sounds like a good story in theory.

In practice, though, I'm sorry to admit that Glenn's (or the author(s) ghosting as Glenn) narrative style fails to engage. Specifically, the mechanics of "show, don't tell" are wontonly discarded. Large portions of this book consist of characters giving speeches. Soliloquies, really. The villain rants about his philosophy at length in his board room to a captive audience. The protagonist and his newfound friends deliver long speeches about their own philosophies at a rally, literally on stage. It's painful to be reading a story while actively cringing at how hamhanded an approach the author is taking in using these cheap shortcuts. It's a political story that wants to have big ideas, true, but it still needs to function foremost as a story.

My other gripe is the romance that develops between the protagonist and the opinionated constituationalist he falls for. While there is a twist to this subplot, the mushiness that the writer employs in describing their relationship is cliche.

The book does have something to recommend it, though.
Read more ›
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews