Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Qty:1
  • List Price: $17.00
  • Save: $6.89 (41%)
FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
The Oz Principle: Getting... has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $25.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Eligible for *FREE* super saver shipping. Amazon customer service with delivery tracking. A book that has been read but is in good condition. Very minimal damage to the cover including scuff marks, or very small tears. Binding has minimal wear, and some pages show signs of use. Occasionally these may be former library books. CD may NOT be included!
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 3 images

The Oz Principle: Getting Results Through Individual and Organizational Accountability Paperback – May 4, 2010

4.1 out of 5 stars 183 customer reviews

See all 16 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$10.11
$3.11 $0.01

Security
ITPro.TV Video Training
Take advantage of IT courses online anywhere, anytime with ITPro.TV. Learn more.
$10.11 FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books. In Stock. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Frequently Bought Together

  • The Oz Principle: Getting Results Through Individual and Organizational Accountability
  • +
  • Change the Culture, Change the Game: The Breakthrough Strategy for Energizing Your Organization and Creating Accounta bility for Results
  • +
  • How Did That Happen?: Holding People Accountable for Results the Positive, Principled Way
Total price: $31.68
Buy the selected items together


Editorial Reviews

Review

The Oz Principle describes what we’ve all suspected - that it isn’t just America in crisis, but the American character. The good news is that Connors, Smith, and Hickman also describe the ‘yellow brick road’ we must follow to rebuild the dominant qualities to achieve success.”

—Stephen R. Covey, author of The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People
--This text refers to the Audio CD edition.

About the Author

Tom Smith and Roger Connors are cofounders of Partners in Leadership, an international management consulting firm with hundreds of clients in almost all major industries. They are also the coauthors of Journey to the Emerald City, a sequel toThe Oz Principle.

Roger Connors and Tom Smith are cofounders of Partners in Leadership, an international management consulting firm with hundreds of clients in almost all major industries. They are also the coauthors of Journey to the Emerald City, a sequel toThe Oz Principle.

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New York Times best sellers
Browse the New York Times best sellers in popular categories like Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Books and more. See more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Portfolio; Rev Upd edition (May 4, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1591843480
  • ISBN-13: 978-1591843481
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.6 x 8.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (183 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #12,905 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
Before adopting this for your business it is worth considering whether it will achieve your goals and if it will have unintended consequences.

One of the first things you may notice in this book is that the authors have trademarked the commercial use of the two phrases "above the line®" and "below the line®". The horizontal "line" separates two types of behavior and attitudes, which represents the OZ principle. This might be some indication of their intentions.

Above the line thinking is about being accountable and below the line thinking is about "the blame game". In other words, the authors posit that we live in a culture of entitlement and pseudo-victimization where we are motivated to avoid accountability and blame others for failure. Consequently, this book (and its associated training courses) is often selected by management to obtain more "accountability" (and less excuses) from their employees.

Such a simplistic formula with a few twists and many anecdotal stories provide the necessary fuel for a highly successful book as well as a robust training and consulting practice. But, the expected results for your organization may not live up to the hype. This should be somewhat obvious on critical reflection, if you believe that people are not nearly as one-dimensional as this approach suggests.

I am all for accountability but have some concerns with this approach. First, its all-encompassing, individually-focused assessment of attitudinal performance is grossly over-simplistic, but interestingly appealing to organizations that are seeking simple solutions to their performance problems. It also appears to satisfy a number of individuals and managers who find solace in uncomplicated prescriptions to guide their staff behaviors.
Read more ›
5 Comments 191 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Approximately two years ago the company I have worked at for more than a decade (a retail pharmacy chain beginning with a W) decided to buy this program from the author, and I'd like to report the consequences of adopting the policies outlined here. I'm a pharmacist who previously enjoyed my job, but the company has ground job satisfaction into dust with this book. Suddenly, in a cult-like move, we had a set of "cultural beliefs" and EVERY official email or communication had to quote at least one of them. The buzzwords are "accountability" and "engagement." This book might be useful for people in management, as a kind of chicken soup for the soul for the business-minded folk, but when the same ideas are applied to the employees, it only breeds resentment and hatred. Morale has never been lower, company-wide, yet there is an annual survey of employee happiness which managers are very careful to supervise, because their bonuses depend upon everyone rating everything highly; in other words, not a real survey at all, but one that the employees feel compelled to answer falsely for fear of retribution. If any employee dares to say that the cultural beliefs are fake, or that personal engagement is low, then immediately there are repercussions, the immediate managers are punished for not making the employees believe they are happy, and all hell breaks loose, with vague suggestions of firings and so on. This book tries to mesmerize the employees into believing that the company's goals are their own, which in many situations could indeed be the case, but certainly not at the one I work for. The book fails to acknowledge the power disparity between manager and employee.Read more ›
Comment 45 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
This was one of those required reading books from work. The book is densely packed -- the hardcover version I have is 222 pages of average-sized type and little margin space. Each section starts with a blurb from the original text of The Wizard of Oz. Halfway through, I was skipping these hokey introductions. I thought that the idea of an analogy was a good one, but it was oddly executed. I don't know what other well-known book I would have used (although in general, I don't know how popular the book is compared to the movie), but perhaps an analogy is not even needed given their See It - Own It - Solve It - Do It mantra is so prevalent in the book (and trademarked).

The advice in the book is good for the most part. It revolves around accountability and how you can either be "Above The Line" or "Below The Line" with it, along with the mantra listed above.

I especially found the following tips noteworthy:
- Accountability is more than a confession.
- As accountability deepens and people move Above The Line within the organization, a shift occurs from the "tell me what to do," to "here is what I am going to do, what do you think?" -- a truly profound and empowering approach to getting results.
- One company president characterized what joint accountability meant to him this way: "Everyone working together so that we don't drop the ball; but when it does get dropped, everyone dives for the ball to pick it up."
- Owning one's circumstances did not mean accepting the perceptions of one's associates as total truth, but rather acknowledging a connection between one's behavior and their perceptions.

However, what would have pushed this book to receive a higher rating from me would have been fewer examples.
Read more ›
Comment 33 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

The Oz Principle: Getting Results Through Individual and Organizational Accountability
Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more about Amazon Giveaway
This item: The Oz Principle: Getting Results Through Individual and Organizational Accountability