Amazon Vehicles Beauty STEM nav_sap_plcc_ascpsc Limited time offer Wickedly Prime Handmade Wedding Shop Home Gift Guide Father's Day Gifts Home Gift Guide Shop Popular Services americangods americangods americangods  Introducing Echo Show All-New Fire HD 8, starting at $79.99 Kindle Oasis Trade it in. Fund the next. Shop Now Ellen

Style Name: 4-Blade Pro|Change
Price:$37.95+ Free shipping with Amazon Prime
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

Showing 1-10 of 8,376 reviews(Verified Purchases). See all 8,922 reviews
That goes double for spiralizing. If you want to work more vegetables into your diet, a spiralizer is an absolute must, and setting aside one or two days a week to prep your veggies will improve your diet tremendously. This Paderno Tri-Blade is one of several spiralizers I own, and it is decent. Below are some details for those of you on the hunt:

A while back I decided to buy a spiralizer and began looking through the options on Amazon. It quickly became clear that nearly every brand had dozens and sometimes hundreds of fake five-star reviews posted on their respective pages. Through other reviewers I learned that the world of vegetable spiralizers is notorious for this problem, Why spiralizers, of all things? No idea, it's really weird. I also noticed that many of the posted reviews for different brands were from people, mostly bloggers, who received their spiralizer directly from the brand for free or almost free in exchange for reviewing it. In the end I bought this Paderno Spiral Vegetable Slicer, because it was the best-seller and I felt I really couldn't fully rely on the reviews for any of the options. I got my Paderno and used it for a while, and it's fine, though not the best I've ever used (more on that in a moment).

We'll break up the review by dividing the various considerations into different vegetable categories, including a lot of things I'd wish I'd known before I bought the Paderno. Here we go:

BROCCOLI STALKS: My favorite vegetable by far to spiralize. I am not a zucchini fan, and of course even clumsily-made spiralizers usually have no issues with zucchinis, as they are soft-ish and watery. The harder vegetables separate the contenders from the also-rans, in my opinion, so we'll start there. The Paderno does a fairly good job with the stalks, but the lack of any kind of catcher for the noodles does drive me crazy. I usually end up placing a sheet of foil below the unit and scooping up my noodles that way (see photo).

PREPARATION SUGGESTION: Use the "Thin Spiral" blade to spiralize 2 large stalks per person you will be feeding. Pan-fry the resulting noodles in olive oil, blitz (or mix) some spaghetti sauce, pre-cooked sausage or meat-substitute, and a handful cilantro together, pour over noodles. Eat a heaping plateful and don't feel sick afterward like you probably would eating that much pasta.

BUTTERNUT SQUASH: One of the big complaints people have about spiralizers is the power of the suction cups, a vital component when you're spiralizing hard veggies like butternut squash. The Paderno cups are okay. The surface (granite, in my case) needs to be clean and very dry, with no grooves or dips. The cups stick to a degree but the unit does slide slowly as you spiralize. With hard veggies, you have to hold the small handle at the base (pulling the vegetable snug to the blade) while turning the crank at the same time. Unless you are unusually gifted you do not have a third arm to also hold the unit to the counter. I would say the Paderno suction cups, three months into thrice-weekly use, barely get a passing grade. They stick but they slide. I will update when they give up entirely.

PREPARATION SUGGESTION: Get a long, lean butternut squash with a small base. Cut base off where bulb starts, then trim skin off the long squash neck. Spiralize neck with "Thick Spiral" blade, then blitz noodles in food processor until they resemble grains of rice. Stir-fry in olive oil with a fajita spice mix folded in. Serve in bowl with protein of your choice. Watch your family eat it like it's their job.

SWEET POTATOES: We spiralize sweet potatoes using any blade we happen to already be using, then stir-fry them with Coconut Secret Coconut Aminos Teriyaki Sauce (a life-saver if you can't have soy and love to stir-fry). I highly recommend washing the blades and unit off immediately after spiralizing to A) make clean up easy instead of ghastly and B) prevent staining. I am a leave-it-until-tomorrow kind of cook but your really don't want vegetable bits to dry out on your unit and make your life miserable. If you wash it right away clean-up takes just seconds.

My current favorite spiralizer is this one: Farberware Pro Spiraletti Spiral Vegetable Slicer with Three Blades. It has two big advantages over the Paderno: There is a chute to catch your spirals and the blades are color-coded, so we can find the right one instantly. I've included some pics of the Paderno and Faberware side by side, so the difference can be seen clearly, and also the similarities. The blade sharpness and strength was pretty much the same on both products, as was the length. The color-coded blades, the chute on the front, and the better suction cups on the Faberware are the major differences that affected performance.

In conclusion, not the very best spiralizer, but serviceable. I prefer the Faberware, but if for some reason you do not want that one, this is a good second choice. Recommended with the above reservations and rating:

GRADE: B/B-
review image review image review image
22 comments| 562 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
EDITED 2014 - This is a review of the original 3 blade version of this slicer which I far prefer to the newer four blade model. If you are deciding between the two I think there is no comparison. While the newer version looks slicker and is more self contained, it just doesn't handle the veggies near as well as this one does. I've reviewed the other machine if you want to have a look and see my issues with it. But this 3 blade version is phenomenal and a staple in my kitchen. Easily one of the best gadgets ever made in my opinion. Read on.....

--

I had to interrupt my cooking to write this review. Believe me, I am not easily moved to write product reviews. This would be my second here on amazon (since the writing of this review three years ago I have added many more product reviews here on amazon).
But, this little turning slicer is amazing. Simply amazing. It makes quick work of everything I throw at it and to date that would include:
radishes
carrots
cucumbers
onions (they work a little differently from the other vegetables)
kohlrabi (makes a fabulous, refreshing salad)
zucchini (I can never remember how many "Ns" are in that vegetable)
apples and,
sweet potatoes
I may even have done a celeriac but I can't recall for sure.
This device never balks.

And it is a pleasure to clean.

I had to give up pasta a few months back and I found myself missing the act of twirling long strands of food on a fork. It was then that I searched for a spiral slicer, not sure if one existed that could meet my fork twirling needs. I bought this little gem because I figured it was inexpensive enough that if I didn't like it all that much, it wouldn't be too much of a hardship.
Honestly, for what this does I would easily pay twice or three times the price.
As I write this I am in the middle of spiralling cucumbers for the old family cucumber salad recipe. Many of the strands that come out of this thing get close to 2 feet long. Food prep doesn't get much more fun than that. The First four (large) cucumbers took all of 4 minutes to break down into perfect, long, spirally strands. I have four more to go when I finish this review.

Okay, some of the reviewers here have complained that you lose about 3/8ths from the center of anything you are spiraling, and this is indeed true. In the case of cucumbers, that means that the device is essentially getting rid of those pesky seeds for you but in the case of a carrot, you lose a bit of viable vegetable. Do I mind this? NO, who cares. Use that center 3/8ths carrot piece for something else, or snack on it while you shred the rest of your veggies. Its not as if the center 3/8ths isn't usable, it just isn't made into long spirally strands. So, it wouldn't make sense to try to shred baby carrots or asparagus because they aren't much larger than 3/8ths of an inch so there wouldn't be much to spiral.

I can't speak to the durability of this slicer because, alas, I've only owned it for two months as of this writing. So far so good however and it does seem durable. It is well designed. The extra blades snap into a holder in the middle of the slicer so you aren't likely to lose them nor are you likely to cut yourself on them inadvertantly. Though lightweight, the whole unit feels fairly sturdy and I can't imagine needing to replace it for a long long time. The whole thing suctions onto your work surface which makes it very manageable. I've started using it in preparations where hitherto I've used a mandolin slicer. This spiral slicer doesn't make it easy to cut off fingertips the way you can with a mandolin.

On a final note before I get back to the cucumber salad.... I do not like kitchen devices that make a job longer than it needs to be and that includes gadgets that take forever to clean or have sharp edges to wash and be careful of. You could hurt yourself with this thing but honestly you would have to try pretty hard to do that. it doesn't want to hurt you and the company seem to have thought of everything so that it would only really injure someone determined to draw blood. it is not a child's toy however and so it requires the same respect you would give any other item with sharp blades.

There is one minor quibble I have with the device and hope that the company reads this and deals with it in a future incarnation of the product... when the spirals come out it is a little bit difficult to manage where they will end up. It would be nice if they design a catch basin type thing for the strands as they fall from the blades. This is a minor quibble because you really can catch all the strands if you're careful but I just don't want to have to be careful all the time.

Okay, that's it, back to my cucumber salad.

EDITED July 2013 -- THOUGHTS AFTER 3 YEARS OF OWNERSHIP:

I still absolutely love this thing. It continues to work flawlessly and fairly effortlessly, breaking down all kinds of vegetables. Admittedly my favorites are cucumbers and zucchini but I have spiralized many others as noted above. In all this time it hasn't stained (as many of these gadgets do) and the blades don't seem to have lost any of their effectiveness. I admit that cleaning it, while still relatively easy, is not child's play. Still, it doesn't take long.

I used to put my zucchini noodles in a vegetable basket on the grill with some spiralized onions and coated with a bit of olive oil, salt, pepper and garlic and they were a crowd pleaser every time. But it has been brutally hot and humid here so I thought I would go for something a little more refreshing. I served the noodles raw (using the smallest blade) and coated them with a homemade "guacamole" sauce. This was another crowd pleaser and rivals the cucumber salad.

3 years later and I can't sing the praises of this thing highly enough. I just really don't understand the naysayers.... particularly the folks who complain about the wasted vegetable "core" Get creative and find something to do with it. Challenge yourself!

Most of all I am impressed by how well this thing has held up.

UPDATE AUGUST 2013....

There seems to be much debate about whether this little unit suctions effectively to the work surface. For me, it does. I have a polished granite countertop. I am going to guess that this suctions much less well (if at all) to some lightly textured formicas. That may well be where the debate stems from.

RECIPES....

UPDATE:
A BLOG AT LAST! I am just starting to blog my recipes. The first four have been posted but am hoping to get many more up and running.....
okay. here's the blog address spelled out.... my website is s n o o t y d o g - dot - c o m. There is a link at the top of the page for my blog. Let me know if you find it useful
5150+ comments| 5,613 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
Let me begin this review by establishing a bit of credibility. I am a long time proponent of the original Paderno Tri Blade slicer. I have one of the top (5 star) reviews of it here on amazon (http://smile.amazon.com/review/R1WN790YI25X21/ref=cm_cr_rdp_perm), use it often, know its strengths and weaknesses, have a small blog of spiralized recipes, and genuinely think it is one of the greatest kitchen gadgets ever invented.

So it was that I was very eager to get my hands on this brand new Paderno Slicer.

At first glance this looks like an incredible upgrade of the tri blade slicer. While keeping the basic premise the same, Paderno has done a major design overhaul. It truly looks like it would be a huge functional improvement. But looks can be deceiving.

With the original slicer some people complained that they lost too much of the veggie to the center coring blade. Paderno answered this complaint by making the central coring blade significantly thinner. Unfortunately, this thin blade is just not strong enough to hold the softer veggies in place while spiralizing. With the original slicer I was able to effortlessly spiralize 10 cucumbers in less than 15 minutes. With this upgraded version the cucumbers kept popping off the center coring blade and the net result was that instead of cucumber "noodles" I had mangled cucumber bits and short cucumber half circles. That was with the widest noodle blade. I had a tad more success using the flat ribbon blade on the cucumbers, but it still wasn't ideal. The noodle cutting blades didn't seem as sharp, either. As a result of all these changes, it took me longer to spiralize than it had with the original slicer. Far longer.

Onions fared better with the widest noodle blade. I assume this is because of their firmer texture. Likewise carrots, Radishes, Kohlrabi and similar "hard" veggies will fare better than the cucumbers or zucchini. There is a very thin blade which works well with the firmer vegetables and if you want angel hair carrots this updated slicer will do a very good job. In fact, the angel hair blade is a real positive improvement but you have to make sure to use firm veggies. My cucumbers turned to mush with the angel hair blade. In truth, I wouldn't expect this to be a good blade for cucumbers though.

This updated version comes with a little catch basin for the noodles as they come off the spiralizer. It was one of the suggestions I made in my original review. But here we find a design flaw.... first of all, I can't imagine what the engineers at Paderno were spiralizing that would fit in this little "trough." One normal sized cucumber easily will overflow that basin when sent through the spiralizer. Also, the design of the machine leaves a bit of a black hole where all the veggies fall. There is no way to get a plate or bowl under the part of the spiralizer that the veggies fall from. I had more vegetables on my counter than I ever had with the original spiralizer. There was an awful lot to clean up when I was done.

Speaking of cleaning up.... the original spiralizer was very easy to clean. Yes, you had to be careful not to manhandle the blades lest you draw blood, but beyond that, it cleaned and dried fairly effortlessly. This upgraded version has a lot of parts and many more construction nooks and crannies to clean. Cleaning it is not an awful job but it is a bit more cumbersome. It also takes a long time to dry because water finds its way into all the nooks.

Are any of the improvements worthwhile? Yes, I suppose so... because the core cutting blade is significantly smaller, you can now spiralize narrower veggies like the little finger carrots. Also, the "teeth" that hold the vegetables in place are a better and sturdier design. Another plus is the design of the blade storage as well as how it the blade plates now slide in sideways. I liked this sideways design... it seems a bit safer somehow. I like the little door that covers the plates that are not in use, and I kind of like the fact that they labelled the plates with squiggly little graphics to show what size and shape noodle each blade plate will make.

But here's the BOTTOM LINE.... None of these improvements are at all useful if the actual purpose of this gadget can't be achieved and honestly, the machine failed with softer veggies. It seems to me from the feedback I get that the most frequently spiralized veggie is zucchini and for that this machine just doesn't compare to the original. If you're looking for a spiralizer for only carrots, potatos, kohlrabi, radishes, onions and other firm veggies and fruits then this would be an acceptable choice. But for me, I most often like to spiralize cucumbers, zucchini and other softer textured veggies and this spiralizer just can't handle those. For my money I want a spiralizer that can handle all the veggies. I will stick with Paderno's original spiralizer. It has kept me happy all these years. Hopefully Paderno will send their engineers back to the drawing board. I will look forward to their next upgrade.

I am changing my rating from two to three stars because it does work okay with the firmer veggies. I still swear by this company and love the original spiralizer.
5150+ comments| 1,277 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on February 27, 2011
I wanted to make my own curly fries. This vegetable slicer does that! I used the 1/4" blade and found that you must use the pressure handle on the unit to produce the best cuts. You do end up with a vegetable core which some people have complained on other reviews that it ends up being waste, but that really was not a big deal to me. I tried cutting up and frying the cores, but I didn't like them so now I just throw the cores away. It's very little waste anyway. I did find that smaller potatoes produced tighter spirals, but the smaller size also produced a lot "waste" where there were just short curved shaves of potato. Larger potatoes produced fewer of the tight spirals and much more of the swooping long spirals, but they also produced less "waste". Using a combination of large and small potatoes produced a good mix of curly fries for me. I fried them in the deep fryer, shook some sea salt on them, and they were YUMMY!

Based on some other reviews, I tried making "zucchini spaghetti", using the 1/8" blade. I found a recipe online at steamykitchen.com where you basically BRIEFLY stir-fry the zucchini noodles and add sauce. The spiral slicer produces very long zucchini spaghetti "noodles" and I did find them to be somewhat difficult to bite off while eating (so just cut them short before cooking) but it really did produce a delicious, low-cal meal!

The extra blades store within the unit, and it's very easy to change them out. Just rinse to clean, and do it sooner rather than later to minimize staining of the white plastic. I paid $29.99 for this slicer and I am very happy with it!
review image review image review image review image review image review image review image review image
1212 comments| 1,130 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on April 12, 2015
I purchased this thing just over 1 year ago, which is unfortunate because apparently there is a 1 year warranty. In the last year I have used it roughly 5 times, hand washed it, and stored it in my pantry with my other kitchen appliances. I was really excited today because I found a new recipe that required spiraled zucchini. I took this thing out, stuck it to the counter, attached the zucchini, and the plastic handle literally CRUMBLED off in my hands. I stood there stunned, then went to remove the zucchini and the piece holding the spiked part on crumbled in half as well.
review image review image review image
44 comments| 439 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on August 3, 2015
First, please know that we loved this product at first---really loved it! After only a couple of uses, however, a metal bushing unknowingly came off into our zucchini casserole. Thankfully my husband found the piece of metal before swallowing it or breaking a tooth on it. My husband feels we need to write a review to warn people of this defective design as it's very dangerous. Hopefully this design flaw will be fixed in the future as we'd love to own the Paderno Spiralizer again one day. Below are pics of the tiny metal piece (which came off into our spiralized zucchini) that too easily pops in and out of its hole by the turn handle.
review image review image review image review image
0Comment| 193 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on May 4, 2011
Spirooli, Oh Spirooli. You are the best kitchen gadget (pertaining to hard cell-walled vegetables) of all time. No joke.

Here are some tips to blatantly counteract the previous less than favorable reviews and complaints about your stellar awesomeness:

1-"Waaaa- It stains too easily" Um...yeah...if you make delicious curly sweet potato fries and go watch CMT for the rest of the afternoon of course the natural dyes are going to stain the device. It's plastic for goodness sake. Clean the tines with a toothbrush and some baking soda within a reasonable timeframe and you will be relatively stain free & much more sanitary.

2-"Booo-The suction cups on the feet dont work" Stop lying-they totally do. My question to you sherlock, do you have the totally rad spirooli on a non-porous surface? Go ahead and check it out. Do ya? I bet you dont! Because my little guy sticks to my counter like no one's business.

3-"Bleeehhh-Its hard to clean" Whoa. Im guessing that you dont have knives in your house either--for they must also be hard to clean. Respect the blades, and no one gets hurt. (...That's What Edward Scissorhands Said) Use the toothbrush or grab your vegetable cleaning brush. Ew-you dont have a vegetable cleaning brush? how did you scrub yr potato?

4-"Weeeeeeep- Its cheap plastic" Dude- if this thing were made of metal, it would be at least $200. Do you have that available in yr disposable income for the luxury of making vegetable spaghetti? Neither do I. We should be thankful the thing isn't made of cardboard for the low low price of 3 Hamiltons. Disclaimer: I would gladly pay two bills for an adamantium spirooli.

5-"OMG! there is a 3/4" core that I HAVE to waste?!?" Just because there is a byproduct of the mounds and mounds of luscious ribbons doesnt mean that you absolutely have to automatically toss it into the compost heap. Instead, I think you should: use the cores for dipping in delicious dip or freeze them to make a yummy vegetable stock in the near future or slice them with a vegetable peeler and then cut them into similar(be it smaller)ribbons or cut them into chips and play poker or give them to the local wildlife. The possibilities are endless. Also, some people have barred carrots because of the 'waste'. My suggestion is to go to your local quality proprietor of carrots and pick up a mama-jama sized carrots. Just today, I was in Whole Foods and I saw carrots the size of a cucumbers.

One last thing- do yourself a favor and get a dehydrator to go with this. You will be grateful you did.

*If you liked this review, be sure to check out all my other reviews on Amazon. I assure you, most are fairly entertaining.*
5150+ comments| 5,960 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on April 28, 2015
I read a lot of reviews before I made this purchase, because there are tons of different companies that manufacture what appear to be like-kind products, and the prices ranged from about $15.00 to more than double that. I finally decided on this Paderno model, and I am happy that I did, as it was worth the added cost for something that performs so well.

I cannot BELIEVE that this unit has any bad reviews, and would love to address what appear to be some of the major concerns of the majority of those poor reviews:

1) "It's made of cheap plastic." While it is made of plastic, it is NOT cheaply made at all. It's weighty, and seems to be very well manufactured. Assembly was simple, and it works very smoothly. If you want a stainless steel slicer? BUY a stainless steel slicer.

2) "It will not stay attached to your countertop". Honestly? I was barely able to pull it back OFF my granite countertop. It anchored VERY securely via the suction cups on the bottom. You literally have to release the feet individually when you want to move it.

3) "It mangles everything", "The vegetables don't stick to the prongs", "The vegetables will not reach the cutting blades", "The instructions are horrible".....I could go on and on, but all I will say at this point is "HUH?????"

Let me start here: I have no idea why anyone of average intelligence would even NEED instructions. It's idiot-proof. SIMPLE to put together. Then you stick the vegetable of choice on the prongs (which DO in fact hold securely), and turn the blade, pushing forward so that the vegetable pushes up against the cutting blade. How it could not REACH the cutting blade is simply unimaginable. I mean honestly - it's simply not possible. Push forward, turn the crank, and get perfectly formed zucchini zoodles, wider cuts or ribbons of other veggie as well, depending on the blade inserted. I put a plate at the end so that the cut veggies did not go all over the countertop, but honestly, it's not messy at all. And clean up was SIMPLE. I just rinsed under hot water in the sink.

I will use this slicer over and over again. It's one of those rare "speciality" items that I will not just throw in the cabinet, never to put to use again. Trust me - I have more of those than I can count on both hands.

So, as relates to all of the one star reviews? I can only think that they are posted by people who have a vested interest in some other product, or by people so lacking in mental capacity as to not be able to operate the simplest of machines. That's not the fault of the manufacturer of this wonderful product. Very honestly, please TRY IT. Amazon has a fantastic return policy. If you really don't think it works well, you can ship it back. But I promise you. Anyone above the age of 5 should be able to put this thing together and be using it with absolutely perfect results in 5 minutes.

Here are some pics to back up my opinion.
review image review image review image review image
22 comments| 49 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on November 6, 2014
Love it !
review image
0Comment| 38 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on September 9, 2016
Love this!!! (1) Has minimal product wastage vs Paderno 3 blade. (2) Easy to use, a little getting used to in terms of "the amount of pressure in pushing veggie to get the spiral" but overall quick. (3) 1 blade needs to be fixed the unit while the other 3 are stored 'under the base.' (4) Easy to store away, rather than an odd shaped gadget that would take up too much room. I've spiralized Zuchinni, Carrots and Cabbage. I get excited every time I'm going to use this tool...just makes me happy :-)
review image review image review image review image
11 comment| 11 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse