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Showing 1-10 of 591 reviews(Verified Purchases). See all 650 reviews
on September 30, 2016
I purchased this as an emergency radio for when the power is out. I live in a sparsely populated mountain area. Stations are not plenteous. I was able to receive the specific AM station I desired as well as quite a few FM stations. I would not call this radio adequate for an audiofile. However, it is perfectly adequate to obtain weather or news alerts.

It comes with an ear plug. There is space in the box it comes in to store 2 AA batteries - which is what it takes. This means I can store the batteries with it but not inside it where they can do damage over time.

No fancy gizmo's to fumble with in the dark. AM/FM switch, volume control knob and a tuning knob. That is it.

If all you want from a radio is the ability to tune into a radio station to find out what is going on - this radio is perfect for that.
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on October 22, 2016
I bought this as a gift for my 8 yo nephew. When I was a kid, the name Panasonic stood for the best looking and performing radios that an average person could buy. Think RF-1060.
I didn't get to test the radio until my nephew's birthday party. I wasn't expecting anything like my early Panasonics, at this price, but I DID expect fairly decent reception and sound reproduction at the very least. I own Sony's ICF-S10mk2 which is about the same size. The Sony is a great old-fashioned pocket radio with excellent reception, build quality, and decent sound, especially for talk radio. By comparison, the Panasonic had awful sound especially for music, it felt flimsy, and reception was sub par but to be fair we were in Westchester, an hour north of NYC, and there are fewer stations. But even with strong FM stations, that speaker sounded tinny compared to the Sony. If it had been for me, I would've returned it, but my nephew seemed intrigued by such a low-tech device, in fact he had no idea what it was and his friends were like wow a radio?
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on February 16, 2008
I recently purchased the Panasonic RF-P50 because I was in need of a portable radio that has a built in speaker. I have discovered that this is hard to come by in a brick and mortar store. So I did a little search on Amazon.com and came across this product.

I also own its direct competitor - the Sony ICF-S10MK2.

The Panasonic radio is great because I can carry it around anywhere and always have music with me where ever I go. I especially like to use it in hotel rooms when I go on trips, but it's also nice to have in order to listen to music in all of the rooms of my apartment.

The Panasonic RF-P50 has a telescoping antenna which can be swiveled back and forth, and on/off/volume switch, band selector, and tuning dial. The speaker measures at 2 and a half inches.

I live in a basement apartment, so it is not always easy to get a fantastic signal. I have discovered that this radio pulls in all the major FM stations quite easily - although sometimes I have to fiddle with the tuning and antenna to get a good reception.

The few local AM stations can be pulled in as well.

The appearance of this radio is quite nice. It appears that Panasonic has taken some time into building a radio that is pleasing to the eye. It's a pocket radio with a nice contemporary look. The radio frequencies are listed on the unit quite clearly - much bigger than what I've seen on similar units from other companies. Also the tuning light, which lets you know when you've locked on to a strong station just right, is bright and easy to see.

This Panasonic pocket radio comes with a wrist strap. This is one of my only gripes. I wish it came with both a wrist strap and a belt clip. Another nice feature that would make this radio better is if one could remove both the wrist strap and belt clip.

How does it sound? Keep in mind, it's a pocket radio, you're not going to get huge sound as you would with a stereo system. However, for its tiny size, the speaker sounds surprisingly good. The sound quality sounds clear, but not too tinny. I've ehard models with much harsher sound. Also don't expect glass shattering bass, you won't find it here. But as I said, for its size, it has a pleasant sound.

In comparing this model to the Sony competitor, I notice a few things.

1. I like the appearance of the Panasonic model over the Sony model. I just feel that the Panasonic model looks nicer.

2. In terms of when I'm holding both radios in my hands, the Sony model seems to have a better build quality (harder plastic, less flimsy feel to the radio). However, I've had the Panasonic model for a while and have had no issues with its build quality. Of course, I'm very careful with my electronics, I don't abuse them.

3. Both models seem about equal in terms of receiving FM signal. Both models pull in the local stations quite easily. The Sony model seems to have a slight advantage in pulling in the slightly weaker stations but this could be due in part to the fact that its antenna is longer.

4. AM reception on the Sony is much better than the Panasonic. It seems to be able to pull in the stations with more clarity. But again, the Panasonic radio can pull in the strong local AM stations just fine.

5. To my ears, both of these models sound exactly the same. Sound quality of music/talk shows sound the same with both units.

NOTE: People should note that the headphone jack on both of these models are in mono only. This means that when you plug stereo headphones in either model, you'll only get sound in one side of the headphones. Please bear in mind that this does not mean the radio is broken. These units were designed this way.

The Bottom Line: I definitely consider the Panasonic RF-P50 a steal at ten bucks. It's a small sized radio that you can carry with you anywhere to listen to music, or get the latest news. Both the Sony and Panasonic models are what I consider to be excellent deals. I prefer the Panasonic over the Sony model though.

For most cases I'd recommend the Panasonic model. But if you're looking for slightly better build quality and better AM reception, then I'd recommend the Sony model. Of course get the Sony model if you prefer its appearance over the Panasonic model.
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on June 12, 2016
I've had the radio for 3 years now and really like it for what I use it for, and that is listening to the Royals & K-State games. I also occasionally listen to NPR on it, but it doesn't get much use for music. The speaker works well enough for talk radio or sports broadcasts, but doesn't offer much bottom end. Batteries seem to last forever in it. I've dropped it a few times and it continues to work fine. The three improvements I would suggest to Panasonic are, in order of importance: provide a belt clip (the loop is useful, but the radio must be put in a pocket for hands-free use while mowing/walking the dog), shift ear phone jack to either the top or bottom (might be less of an issue if a belt clip were provided), and modify it so the earphone output is at least dual-mono. As it is, only one ear phone receives the output.

For the price and my intended use, it's a great option.
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on September 24, 2015
Recently a fiber optic line in my area was cut by vandals, bringing down internet (including, somehow, cellular phone) access in my city. Government officials had to scramble to figure out how to handle big tasks like routing 911 calls, while lowly business owners like me tended to walk outside the office, look around, and wonder when the internet would start working again. There was no cellular data connection, we could make no cell phone calls, there was no home internet, no office internet. No neighbor internet, no nearby cafe internet. And we didn't have a land line phone, either (psh!).

I spun up our emergency hand-crank AM radio and got nothing. At the time, I had no concept of what the sun hitting the ionosphere might have to do with this, only that AM radio appeared to be out too.

I ran out to the car and again, no AM radio. But that's where all the news is! I started flying through our FM stations and, after 10 minutes of listening to some awful music, the message came through: A line has been cut, and here is an ETA.

Hooray! A few hours later, we were back up and running again.

Still, this had been an inconvenient scenario. It made me wonder what sorts of things I might miss, not having a radio nearby. While I had been thinking of it as an obsolete and relatively useless form of communication, it seemed to have its benefits.

I purchased this Panasonic and the little Kaito KA321. Of the two, this has been a better AM performer. In the evening I can pick up KOH Reno, which is almost 250 miles away from where I live.

Keep in mind that AM not working as well during daytime is normal. I get one station during the daytime here in rural northern California, and it's in a language I don't understand. In the evening, the band opens up and I can get station after station.

It's a bit annoying that this radio doesn't do FM stereo through headphones. So I like the Kaito KA321 better for portable use when exercising. But the little earbud it comes with is more than enough for private listening during leisure time, if you're camping or whatever. With the other ear you can hold a conversation with somebody else.

This radio is also more awkward for exercise because of the headphone cord position. If you slip it into a pocket, you wonder how much shear stress will be placed on the headphone plug. If you hold it in your hand, you try to find a position where it sits comfortably without bashing the headphone plug against something.

Still, I won't be sending it back. It's a good little radio that does the job.
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on July 26, 2016
I Love these "Pocket" Radio's. I hate Ear Buds in my Ears, So I buy these. This Panasonic is MUCH BETTER than other brands. I have had about 10 of this same model. They last about 2 years, then the control knobs go bad and you need a new radio. BUT, $20 for 2 years worth of Great Radio Listening is a pretty good deal to me. Nothing Lasts Forever. Buy it, You'll Like It.
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TOP 1000 REVIEWERon October 29, 2015
Good radio at a good price. I have had literally dozens of these walkman-sized radios (the early ones even had casette players). The two brands that served me best were Sony and Panasonic - i still have an old panasonic that's 15 years old and it works fine except for the fact that the battery door broke. In any event this P50 is roughly equivalent to the Sony ICF S10MK2 (@ $16.49@ Amazon at this writing) which I also have. They are roughly equivalent. The Panasonic is ever-so-slightly smaller (e.g., 1/8" lengthwise, 1/16" widthwise) and has rounded edges, but both perform equally well for me. The performance is so similar that I would recommend basing purchasing decision on price alone. In fact that's what I am doing now that my Sony is suffering from normal wear and tear. Note that the earphone jack is MONO only.

I just noticed that Panasonic has discontinued this model (though Amazon still has some in inventory). So by the time you read this the P50 may no longer be available
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on August 22, 2016
Bought this for my husband so he can listen to the Chicago Cubs on ch. 670, since we cannot get it on tv. He loves it. From back in the day we had transistor radios and used a 9 volt battery, but this one used 2 AA batteries. Has one ear phone. It is pretty nice.
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on January 17, 2017
I mean, it's a radio, not a supercomputer. It does what radios do.
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on January 18, 2017
Cheap construction. Battery cover tends to come off and then bye-bye batteries. Returned! and got the Eton Mini Compact AM/FM/Shortwave Radio, for $10 more, but is a lot more durable.
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