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Do You Hear What I Hear? Parents and Professionals Working Together for Children with Special Needs Paperback – March 15, 2000

4.5 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Ms. Fialka has worked professionally in the field of adolescent health care for more than 30 years, as a social worker, educator, consultant, administrator, grant writer, and trainer. From 1986 through 1998, she was the director of the Taylor Teen Health Center, which she co-founded. In 1992 she expanded her professional work to include consultation and speaking to professionals and parents of children with special needs. She combines her personal experience as a mother of a 21-year-old son who has developmental disabilities and her professional expertise as a social worker, trainer, and national speaker.

Janice was a member of the Michigan Special Education Advisory Committee (2003-2006) and is a current Member of the Advisory Board of Everyone Together. Janice is a Reviewer for Young Exceptional Children (YEC), a publication of Division for Early Childhood of the Council for Exceptional Children (CEC).

Currently Ms. Fialka is the Special Projects Trainer for Michigan’s Early On ® Training and Technical Assistance (Part C of IDEA). In this role, Janice has co-authored and facilitates a four part training titled, Knowing Ourselves and Connecting with Families which uses the principles of reflective practice and relationship-based work when working with families of young children who are challenged by mental illness, cognitive impairments, and/or unstable living conditions.

Ms. Fialka has provided the keynote address at numerous conferences throughout the country. In her talk, The Dance of Partnership: Why Do My Feet Hurt? she addresses the unique dimensions which challenge the partnership between professionals and parents of children with special needs.

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 88 pages
  • Publisher: First Page Publications; 58748th edition (March 15, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1882792858
  • ISBN-13: 978-1882792856
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6.1 x 0.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,681,811 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Top Customer Reviews

By A Customer on March 26, 2003
Format: Paperback
This book is an excellent resource for any parent or professional involved in the life of a child with special needs! It is a must have! Written with the personal perspective of a parent, it provides an invaluable insight for professionals working with families on any level.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Great book to read. You get to see the side of the parents and professionals.
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Format: Paperback
great
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Format: Paperback
Working on business issues involves sharing your thoughts and mental work load with others (partners, employees, suppliers and customers). No longer can you personally or corporatively keep all the balls up in the air by yourself. Collaboration and partnership is the name of the game.
The process of sharing with others clarifies and enhances your original vision of the business opportunity. Talking it out generates some breakthroughs that can have a major impact on your future direction. Communicating your thoughts with others, who have different experiences and skills, will allow you to discover things you didn't know that you didn't know.
Although collaberation is important today, effective partnerships can be elusive and hard to crasp for most people. A new book, "Do You Hear What I Hear?", by Janice Fialka and Karen C. Mikus published by Procter Publications, LLC, explores the journey to creative partnerships. Although written to parents and professionals who help children with special needs, this book guides us all in understanding how to strengthen our partnerships with others. Here are some points the authors make regarding misunderstandings about the nature and evolution of partnerships:
"...there is often the expectation that parents and professionals immediately are full partners simply by sitting together at a conference table to discuss the plans and goals for a child. Our experience has been just the opposite: that partnershps evolve over time, go through various phases and involve different interactions during various points of working together. For these reasons, we believe that a developmental approach to partnerships is both realistic and useful.
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