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A Part, and Yet Apart

4.6 out of 5 stars 13 customer reviews

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Audio CD, March 16, 1999
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Editorial Reviews

Bill Bruford A Part, And Yet Apart UK CD album

Track Listings

Disc: 1

  1. No Truce With The Furies
  2. A Part, And Yet Apart
  3. Some Shiver, While He Cavorts
  4. Footloose And Fancy Free
  5. Sarah's Still Life
  6. The Emperor's New Clothes
  7. Curiouser And Curiouser
  8. Eyes On The Horizon
  9. Dewey-eyed, Then Dancing


Product Details

  • Audio CD (March 16, 1999)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Discipline Us
  • ASIN: B00000I9K2
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #273,310 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
Frankly, most of what passes for jazz these days is talented players with little or no imagination, inspiration, or willingness to take a few risks. This album stays true to its roots, but also pushes the envelope. The pushes are subtle, as Bruford's latest edition of Earthworks performs seamless riffs and signatures, like 11/4 (whoh!). If you're looking for Crimson or Yes here, be reminded that Bruford (like Steve Smith, formerly of Journey, and Sting, to name a few) started out as jazz wannabe's, but were drawn in different directions. So, it's no accident that the progressive groupings of the 60's and 70's came about as a result of the widely varied musical background from whence they came. Some - unfortunately few - are still at it and naturally seek out the new talent to keep it fresh. Bruford, in any musical setting, remains in a class of his own. Great stuff.
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Format: Audio CD
The two things missing from the helpful reviews of this disc below are detailed specifics about the songs and, most importantly, whether a fan of progressive rock would even like this stuff. This, then, is for people who come to Bruford primarily through King Crimson or Yes, and, to a lesser extent, his pre-Earthworks stuff.
The disc opens with "No Truce with the Furies," kicking off on a rhythmic piano and bass line with an odd-metered feel to it behind which Bruford skips snare rolls and a steady metronome on the ride. Saxophone then introduces the main theme, edging the piece toward a jazzier feel than the opening suggests followed by an even more thoroughly jazzy piano bit. Some subdued ensemble mayhem full of catchy accents, instrumental flourishes and elegant transitions ensues with a return to the piano-bass and saxophone to close out the piece. For someone not jaded with jazz, this piece might well stand out as having more urgency than is normally associated with "this kind of jazz".
"A Part, and yet Apart" (an inversion of Peter Hammill's closing sentiment from "A Plague of Lighthouse-Keepers"?) starts off with a mellow and easygoing swing feel topped by a lyrical soprano sax lead, then gives way to a more insistent section that gradually builds and flashes (too briefly) through some beautiful harmonized runs to return to the opening mellowness. This basic pattern repeats til the end, with various instruments getting lead duty and emotional crests (including the beautiful runs again). The pairing of the moods here seems especially fine and effective.
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Format: Audio CD
Earthworks' sophomore lineup of Bill Bruford (drums), Patrick Clahar (saxes), Mark Hodgson (upright bass) and Steve Hamilton (piano) has produced an effort worth every penny to jazz and fusion fans alike. Although fans of traditional jazz may find more progressive efforts a bit harsh to the ears, this release takes Bruford back to his roots in jazz and will certainly appeal to even those that claim to be "purists." Absent are the electronic keys and chordal drums prevalent in earlier Earthworks releases ("Earthworks," "Dig?"), and in their place an acoustic instrumentation that lends itself well to the diversity of compositions. For instance, the title track is almost reminiscent of early Brubeck, while tunes such as "The Emperor's New Clothes" take on a decidedly more modern feel. The ending track, "Dewey-Eyed, Then Dancing" brings a romantic close to this very powerful recording.
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Format: Audio CD
Hard to believe that Earthworks now have six albums on the market. Obviously a side neture that Bruford pulls out of the hat when he gets time, this time out he has three new cohorts.
The result is a quirky bit of fun to rival the first Earthworks album. The point is not whether Bruford is a "jazz drummer", he's not trying to be anyone else but himself here. There's a strong jazz influence, but there's an equal dash of Rock and roll too. Frankly, occasionally, when he pushes into drive mode - he pushes the band beautifully.
Negatives on this album would be it's a little short - and Bruford should did this more often! Mind you, perhaps the beauty is that he makes us wait. Mind you, all credit does not belong with Bruford, Mark Hodgeson on Bass is wonderful (although I could have done with the bass being higher in the mix. Steve Hamilton on keyboards has a great touch, and Patrick Clahar on Sax fits perfectly with Bruford more eccentric touches.
This is a tight album - a very upbeat album. I can't wait for Bruford to find yet more time, and to give us some more Earthworks!
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Format: Audio CD
This is a great jazz CD. A bit avant agrde, a bit ecclectic but a great listen. Acoustic bass, drums, piano, sax and horns from a great but mostly unheard and unknown 4 piece. Bill has been around the block a time or 2. Most all Bill Bruford music is hard driving modern jazz/fusion but most importantly with melody, pace and rythmn. The other Earth works issues contain none of this to my ears. APart... is a breath of fresh air. Very nicely recorded, audiophile sound with great piano and bass miking. And of course Bill is there but more in the back ground than ever before but still driving the bus.
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