Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Buy Used
$4.20
FREE Shipping on orders over $25.
Condition: Used: Acceptable
Comment: The item is fairly worn but continues to work perfectly. Signs of wear can include aesthetic issues such as scratches, dents, and worn corners. All pages and the cover are intact, but the dust cover may be missing. Pages may include limited notes and highlighting, but the text is not obscured or unreadable.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 3 images

Parvana's Journey Paperback – July 2, 2003

4.6 out of 5 stars 62 customer reviews
Book 2 of 4 in the Breadwinner Series

See all 17 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback, July 2, 2003
$7.83 $0.01

Agatha Parrot and the Odd Street School Ghost by Kjartan Poskitt
Agatha Parrot and the Odd Street School Ghost
The popular new release from Kjartan Poskitt and Wes Hargis. Learn more | See related books
click to open popover

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Sequel to The Breadwinner, Parvana's Journey by Deborah Ellis follows the eponymous 12-year-old girl who, disguised as a boy, sets off from Kabul in search of her missing mother and siblings in Taliban-era Afghanistan. When war breaks out, she bands together with other displaced children. Royalties from the sale of the book go to Women for Women, a relief organization benefiting women in Afghanistan. Ages 10-14.
Copyright 2002 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From School Library Journal

Grade 7-10-This sequel to The Breadwinner (Groundwood, 2001) easily stands alone. After her father's death, 13-year-old Parvana, disguised as a boy, wanders alone through war-torn Afghanistan looking for her mother and siblings who had disappeared in the tumult of the Taliban takeover of Mazar-e-Sharif. Early in her journey, Parvana comes across a baby, the only survivor in a bombed village. She takes him along, as both a burden and comforting company. Taking shelter in a small cave, she discovers an angry one-legged boy who is starved for both food and human companionship. Imagining treasure in their cave, they dig, only to find a cache of bullets-a scene that epitomizes what childhood has become for these young people. The three continue Parvana's search, stopping for a time in an apparent safe haven on the edge of a minefield where an eight-year-old lives with a near-comatose grandmother. When their refuge is destroyed, the four children join a long line of refugees, arriving finally at a camp. A bittersweet ending offers some hope for Parvana and her family, but readers are left with a horrifyingly realistic picture of the effect of war on children. While the reading is not difficult, the grim content cries out for discussion. An unforgettable read.
Kathleen Isaacs, Edmund Burke School, Washington, DC
Copyright 2002 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New York Times best sellers
Browse the New York Times best sellers in popular categories like Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Books and more. See more

Product Details

  • Age Range: 10 - 12 years
  • Grade Level: 5 and up
  • Lexile Measure: 640L (What's this?)
  • Paperback: 176 pages
  • Publisher: Groundwood Books; Reprint edition (July 2, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0888995199
  • ISBN-13: 978-0888995193
  • Product Dimensions: 0.5 x 5 x 7.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 0.3 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (62 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #62,914 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Traci D. Haley on December 2, 2002
Format: Hardcover
I read "Parvana's Journey" over Thanksgiving break. This book, the sequel to Ellis' "The Breadwinner", continues the story of Parvana, a young Afghan girl who disguises herself as a boy in order to help her family survive. In this one, Parvana's been separated from her mom and siblings, and her father has just died. She travels across Afghanistan, picking up refugees as she goes along (including an infant boy, a boy missing a leg, and a girl who believes she is magically protected against mine fields). This installment was even more heartwrenching than the last and it is truly the perfect novel to read at Thanksgiving time - it makes you remember what you should be thankful for.
Comment 14 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
I am a fan of Deborah Ellis' work, especially since I read Parvana's Journey, and The Breadwinner. Parvana is a young girl who must disguise herself as a boy to support her family in Taliban-controlled Afghanistan (The Breadwinner), and then must try to find them again (Parvana's Journey).
Parvana is a wonderful character: she is smart, brave and resourceful. She lives in a terrible place and time, but she never admits defeat. ALthough the things that Parvana goes through are horrible, her story is really one of hope. And gives real insight into the situation in Afghanistan, and what people have to face there. Very readable, very relevant -- I highly reccomend this book.
Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
A Kid's Review on January 27, 2007
Format: Paperback
When Parvana sets out on her long journey to find her mother, sisters and brother, she is a new person. For the journey she cut her hair and put on boys clothes. The Taliban is ruling Afghanistan and Parvana cannot be wandering around, alone as a girl. In the beginning of her journey, Parvana stops at a village, left in ruins after a bomb. While she is wandering around the village, she hears a noise. Not an animal noise, but a human noise. She looks inside the hut with the noise and finds a thin, crying baby. In front of the baby is the body of a woman, with the flap of her burqa (a long garment covering the whole body) flipped up. Parvana decides to bring the baby with her on her journey. She names the baby Hassan and treats him as if he is her son. Along the way Parvana meets two more people. Asif is a one-legged, selfish and angry boy and Leila is a curious, caring and young girl. Parvana does not get along easily with Asif and Asif tends to throw rocks at her and insult her when he is mad. Hassan can sometimes drive Parvana crazy with all of his crying and Leila wanders off into mine fields and goes into villages when they are being bombed even when Parvana tells her not to. The most interesting thing about the story is that even though she can get very frustrated with them and their not always nice to her, Parvana always shares her food with them (even when theres only a little bowl of rice for their food), shares her blankets with them and treats them as though they were never ever mean, frustrating or annoying to her. Parvana is a perfect example of the Golden Rule. She treats Asif, Leila and Hassan the way she would want to be treated.
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
This book is an emotional loopty-loop. It really brought to life the poverty and hunger that "we" feel is so far away...death,,,killing,,,mourning,,,sorrow and graves were plentyful in this book. It shows the world the social issues from a resident's perspective. Although there were many sad times in the book, it was well written and deserves to be a bestseller. (hopefully this book will push ppl to join peace corps. to Afganistan)
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I'm a teacher who assigns this book to my students to read. The school doesn't provide the books so I buy them myself for my students. I like the used books for a better value. Fantastic book. Kids like the story and it is a great way to start a discussion about culture, freedoms, rights, values and how lucky Americans are. Good historical background on the Taliban. Make sure you also get the next three books in the series.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Deborah Ellis’ novel, Parvana’s Journey, is an emotional roller-coaster. Throughout the book, the reader sees the theme of perseverance. The author presents the theme well and tries to show the reader the horrors of war. For readers who enjoy emotional and heavily realistic books, this book is a winner. However for those who prefer a lighter novel, this story may not be their style.
Parvana, the protagonist, travels through many places on her journey to find her family, and faces many sorrows. For example, at the beginning, her father dies from hunger and exhaustion. She is forced with only one option: continue alone. But she soon joins up with three other children along her journey, all of them victims of war. Hassan, who is a baby boy that Parvana finds lying next to his dead mother, Asif, a one legged, rude boy, and Leila, an energetic and curious young girl, whose family has literally been destroyed by war. They desperately wander through the bombed-out places of war, constantly facing dangers such as bombs and land mines, while eating and drinking almost anything they can find. Finally, they blunder upon a refugee camp where Leila is tragically killed in a mine field while trying to grab food. However, keeping with the roller-coaster theme, Parvana finally finds her mother and remaining family in the refugee camp.
For readers who can appreciate the hard reality of war, this book should certainly be on their favorites list. The children in the novel face death and horror right in the face, and yet somehow they continue to persevere and believe that they will survive. That is what makes this novel so heartfelt. For example, when a man who is also wandering, tells the children that Hassan will soon die (p.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews