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Showing 1-10 of 185 reviews(Verified Purchases). See all 264 reviews
on January 20, 2016
A fine film, beautiful to watch and listen to (perfect score!), with top-notch performances from Judy Davis, Peggy Ashcroft, James Fox, and especially Victor Bannerjee. This I believe was the last film made by the great director David Lean, and it is a worthy finale to his career.

The bonus features offer a lot in the way of interviews and commentary on everything from the careers of the novelist Forster and the director Lean, to footage of the filming, to interviews with the actors. We normally don't watch bonus features, but we were riveted to these. The two-disc set is truly a collector's edition.
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on August 10, 2015
Enjoyable film. I had just finished watching The Jewel in the Crown, an earlier show about the English in India, and A Passage to India seemed somewhat similar. Even some of the same actors. The Jewel in the Crown was a series whereas A Passage to India is a movie but somehow the series seemed more vibrant. Still no denying the photography in the movie is wonderful.
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on September 26, 2014
I watched this many times before I analyzed the editing to see how well crafted this story is. well acted; only Alec Guinness' acting is slack. lots of memorable lines and moments; ("you have no right here; you should have removed your shoes")("it makes me quite ashamed to see guests not treated properly")
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on May 2, 2016
This is a very interesting film which reveals several truths about the way the British treated the Indian people, ignoring they have a culture more than 5000 years old, the refinement of the upper classes, all of them were treated as trash. It came on time and well
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on July 6, 2000
In his brilliant exploration of the question he ultimately posed in HOWARDS END (who shall inherit England?), E. M. Forster gifted us with A PASSAGE TO INDIA. The novel, and the movie, provide deceptively simple characters to carry Forster's views along...the arrogance of a British-dominated culture meddling where it once again does not belong; the impossible melding of certain classes and/or temperaments; and the ultimate sacrifice or tragedy that must occur in order for the madness to cease. Into the mix Forster adds (as he did with Ruth Wilcox in HOWARDS END) the mysterious female entity (the enigmatic Mrs Moore) who seems to be in touch with all elements, earthly and spiritual. Director David Lean could not have done better in casting Dame Peggy Ashcroft as this luminous woman; she becomes the movie's triumphant center, its moral conscience and all-seeing eyes, and at the same time leaves us with one of the most memorable performances in recent cinema. Excellent support also comes from the brilliant Judy Davis (in a nearly impossible part to play, Davis succeeds almost frighteningly well) as the hysterical Miss Quested, dashing Victor Banerjee as the harried Dr Aziz, and James Fox as the character caught between two clashing worlds (much the same way Margaret Schlegel was in HOWARDS END).
David Lean has created so many memorable films and setpieces it seems almost redundant to objectify them, but let it be said the sequence here with the visit to the ominous Marabar Caves is one of his best--beautifully choreographed, perfectly timed, and with just enough mystery to inspire as much discussion as the novel. How often does that happen?
It may not be a rousing action epic, but it will leave the discerning viewer with much to think about and should inspire several viewings to take in all the levels of meaning. A most rewarding film experience.
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on October 23, 2007
For those poor people expecting a big tub-thumping epic like Lawrence of Arabia or Doctor Zhivago, this subtle and sophisticated and meticulous adaptation of E.M. Forster's mysterious novel will bewilder and bore. For the rest of us, it is an extraordinary tale of five friends whose lives are upended by a single lie...and how they heal afterwards. Set against the racial tension of a horribly provencial town in India, where Forster actually witnessed the inequalities from both British and Indians that he wove into his novel, PASSAGE is David Lean's final, and most profound, epic.

Exactly the length of The Bridge on the River Kwai, Passage is made with the same attention to the detail of the psychology of the characters, where it begins and where it developes and concludes. The cutting is brisk and even bold; the cut to the close up of the sterile lunar landscape during Mrs. Moore's dialogue about a "Godless universe" puts to shame anything a younger director could do then, or now.

Yes, Professor Godbole should have been played by an Indian actor, but Alec Guinness is identical to the character in the novel who, by the way, Forster describes as having "a small grey moustache, light eyes and a complexion as fair as any European's", in short he is Anglo-Indian. Guinness is spot on.

I saw this film projected, in gloriously HUGE 1.66:1 aspect ratio, a day after having just seen Lawrence of Arabia. The difference in audience reactions was astounding. Lawrence, acclaimed one of the greatest films ever made, bored the audience into numbed silence. Passage, a pleasant and deeply engrossing surprise, was given explosive applause afterwards.
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on January 3, 2017
Great movie. I visited India and it was exactly like the movie. Great footage. I am American and was treated with great respect during my visit. I would certainly like to visit again to see some of the caves and beautiful landmarks that I saw in the movie.
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on July 9, 2017
A bit melodramatic for its time. The filming was beautiful and rich, the story intriguing but it felt a bit too much at times. It's worth a watch.
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on September 25, 2011
A Passage to India [Blu-ray]
When I saw this movie a few years ago I was very impressed by the story that takes place in colonial India , I wanted to see it again ,buying this DVD I watched for the second time enjoying this copy with a very good quality.
The complexity of all the characters is very well shown: A young woman, Adele played by Judy David who goes to India with Mrs. Moore played by Peggy Aschkroft wants to be Exposed to the Indian culture, meets Dr Aziz who organized a tour to Marabar Caves for her .Adele affected to the heat suffers an accident, the English Authorities force her to press charges against Aziz, the incident changes the life of many people. All the transformations of the characters occur in this story are reflected in the movie very successful.
This film also shows the colony society, the differences between the English and Indian at the end of XIX century.
The direction is outstanding as well as the acting and photography.
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on September 10, 2015
"All because some young girl from England got too much sun." When I first saw this film years ago, it didn't make much sense to me. I was expecting a simple story of a young woman's Indian adventure. It was disconcerting that I didn't much like the weak, confused, inconstant girl; wasn't she supposed to be the central figure of the story? But when they visit the caves, the travel log goes off the rails, and one realizes it is rather a story about the relationship of Dr. Aziz and Mr. Fielding. There are very humorous parts, like the expressions of the Calcutta lawyer as he watches the prosecution's case self-destruct. OK, I've told you how the trial ends; but I have not told you how the movie ends.
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