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People, Places, Checkmates: Teaching Social Studies with Chess

3.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review
ISBN-13: 978-1591588504
ISBN-10: 1591588502
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Editorial Reviews

Review

"The concept is clever. . . . An exercise based on Benjamin Franklin's 'morals of chess,' a list of golden rules to be observed while playing the game, is also fascinating, as are studies of famous chess players and foreign chess terms." - Arches

About the Author

Alexey W. Root is a senior lecturer in education at The University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX, and a former U.S. Women's chess champion.

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 146 pages
  • Publisher: Libraries Unlimited (March 23, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1591588502
  • ISBN-13: 978-1591588504
  • Product Dimensions: 8.4 x 0.5 x 10.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,092,408 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Wow- I am introducing my world history class to chess this year and was very excited about this book. The author says they were a teacher but these are the most cumbersome lesson plans I've ever read. The author goes into long explanations that point you to other sources. For lesson 3 the materials and sources is 3 paragraphs long. "to correctly mark Baghad (Iraq), Merv (Mary, Turkmenistan) (4 more cities with 2 names)... On your chalk or dry- erase board, look up those cities in Silk Road Seattle (Neelis, 2002). The cities are in a line sloping gently northeast (from Baghdad to Dunhuang) and then the line turns southeast ( from Dunhuang to Chang'an). Three of the cities... are closer to each other than to the other cities. Etc. etc.". Really? The author couldn't have sketched a map for us to follow? Then exercise 2 which is also labeled 2.5, says to look for the solution in Appendix A. The answer comes on the page before the answer to 2.1. Appendix A is difficult to follow and read. The copies of student work are poor copies of work done in pencil and difficult to read. I will add it to my book shelf as a resource but will be counting on myself to write my curriculum.
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